Thursday, January 30, 2020

Robert Griswold, Jamal Hill Head Into The Olympic Year

53 athletes were named to the 2020 U.S. Paralympics Swimming National Team, as announced today by the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee. The team features 33 women and 20 men, including 19 Paralympians and 9 reigning world champions.

With this being a Paralympic Games year, this is an incredibly important time for our team,” said Queenie Nichols, director of U.S. Paralympics Swimming. “The team just concluded a national team camp which only heightened their excitement for Tokyo 2020. This will be an exciting year, and we can’t wait to get the season started.”

The national team includes two KAATSU users, Robert Griswold (S8/SB7/SM8) from Freehold, New Jersey and Jamal Hill (S9/SB8/SM9) of Inglewood, California.

Griswold performed very well at the 2019 world championships, helping the American team that heads to Melbourne, Australia in February for the World Para Swimming World Series. Indianapolis - relatively close to Griswold's training base at Indiana State University - will be a stop on the World Para Swimming World Series on April 16th-18th.

The U.S. Paralympic Team Trials will be held June 25th-28th in Minneapolis, where the athletes who will represent Team USA in Tokyo will be selected. The Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 will be held August 25th - September 6th.

Every morning before his first workout of the day, Griswold understands the value of doing repeated KAATSU Cycles to warm-up his limbs - and repeating the KAATSU Cycles after the workouts as a recovery modality. Hill similarly frequently uses his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to help him with warm-ups and recovery.



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

John Doolittle Talks About Human Potential



John Doolittle was a competitive swimmer at the Air Force Academy and later crossed the English Channel in a memorial swim for one of his fellow fallen Navy SEALs.

"John profoundly understands the concepts of honor and sacrifice and reaching one's true potential," said Steven Munatones about the retired Navy SEAL captain with 25 years of military service. "He not only crossed the English Channel, but he had to face the hardships of the famous BUD/s training of the Navy SEALs in the Class of 213. He gives great motivational talks to kids and people of all ages and from all walks of life."

He recently gave a brief talk to young aquatic athletes at Los Alamitos High School [see above] about reaching their potential.

Some background about the Navy SEALs:



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Friday, January 24, 2020

KAATSU Soccer Applications































"My knee popped," recalled Josh Saunders, then a goalkeeper with the U.S. Major League Soccer team Real Salt Lake.

"When I came down, I knew the injury was bad, but I had no idea what was to come."

Saunders' fears were confirmed - a torn left ACL, a bad common soccer injury. However, Saunders' injury became more than the typical case - it became life-threatening.

Two weeks after his surgery, Saunders not only contracted a serious bone infection caused by the bacterium streptococcus, but also a candida fungus. "It was no longer about my return to football," Saunders said. "It was about surviving."

Now the New York City Football Club goalkeeper says he is lucky to be alive and to still have his leg. Saunders credits his complete victory to U.S. Olympic ski team doctor and sport scientist Dr. James Stray-Gundersen and his cutting-edge recovery, fitness, and strength protocols - the AlterG treadmill and the KAATSU.

Saunders was looking for anything to get him back in the goal. He had lost significant weight, and more importantly, muscle mass. Saunders met Dr. Stray-Gundersen who elevated his fitness and built his strength with KAATSU protocols, very quickly.

"I had never heard of KAATSU or Blood Flow Moderation Training before.

But Dr. Stray-Gundersen showed me results from his top skier, and I was all for it. He applied 30 minute KAATSU sessions, 5 days per week and in a matter of a few sessions, I had significant increases in strength, and my quad size increased
," said Saunders. "I got that same fatigue feeling in my muscles, with no heavy weights. It was amazing."

"I heard about KAATSU from Harvard researchers who had visited Japan," recalls Dr. Stray-Gundersen. "But we never looked into KAATSU until one of our medalists went down with a severe injury a month before the 2014 Winter Olympics. We rehabilitated [Todd Lodwick] him using KAATSU exclusively, and he raced in 28 days, and we became believers."

Major League Soccer defender Kuami Watson-Siriboe, another ACL tear victim, started the same KAATSU program. The effects were shockingly immediate. "I quickly recovered doing KAATSU 3-Point Exercises and the KAATSU Cycle," says Watson-Sirboe.

"In all applications, we always assess capillary refill and responses throughout recovery - same as Dr. Sato has done since the 1970's," said Dr. Stray-Gundersen. "The KAATSU equipment allows me to identify the optimal pressure each time which is critical for safety and effectiveness as we will fill normally unused capillaries and engage more muscle fibers - we want to achieve the 'fatigue' in the muscle so that the physiologic cascade to produce Growth Hormone, occur.

Simply put, you cannot get beneficial results, if you do not use proper protocols, equipment, and safety checks required with blood flow moderation training used with KAATSU. As always, the athlete safety and recovery is our first concern and KAATSU researched system sets the standard
."

Saunders concluded after winning the NYFC Player of the Month in May 2015, "I couldn't believe the results at first, but I had faith in Dr. Stray-Gundersen and KAATSU, and I just wanted to get back on track as fast as the skier did. I am now stronger, faster and quicker than I was before my injury."

Details:
January 6th 2014: Left ACL reconstruction with Right hamstring graft
January 14th 2014: Alter-G and KAATSU protocols re-started within first post-op week [above photo shows left 8 weeks post op
April 2014: 12 weeks post-op: gait, girth and strength of quadriceps normal and symmetric to contra-lateral side. Instituted drills on the pitch
May-June 2014: Return to normal training/practice.
July 2014: First game, 23 weeks post op
March 2015: MLS Player of the Month

Copyright © 2014= - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

KAATSU Lecture Series - James Stray-Gundersen, MD















Dr. James Stray-Gundersen received his Board Certification in General Surgery in 1985. He then completed Post Doctoral Fellowships in Cardiovascular Physiology and Human Nutrition at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School where he received appointments as Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, and Physiology.

While on faculty, over 20 years at UTSW, Dr. Stray-Gundersen conducted research and built and directed two World Class Human Performance Centers associated with leading hospitals, St. Paul and Baylor. Dr. Stray-Gundersen’s primary interest and area of research is maximal human performance, the physiology of health and fitness/wellness through exercise prescription, markers of overtraining, nutrition as it applies to performance and health, altitude acclimatization and training (pioneered Live Hi/Train Low), and anti doping (developed anti doping test SAFE – Safe and Fair Events).

Since 1984, Stray-Gundersen has worked with numerous Olympians in various sport disciplines advising on training for Maximal Human Performance and has an ongoing relationship with the great runner and director of the NIKE Oregon Project, Alberto Salazar. Dr. Stray-Gundersen lead the first invasive anti-doping research at the World Championships in Lahti, Finland in 1985 and his work continues with the development and implementation of the SAFE Test — Safe and Fair Events — considered by some the most aggressive blood profiling test in the fight against cheating. He has been an official physician/consultant of United States, Norwegian, and Canadian Olympic Teams, and an official member of over 15 World Championships.

Stray-Gundersen has served on International Medical Committees that include the International Olympic Committee, FIFA, International Biathlon Committee, International Ski Federation, and the International Skating Union. He has worked with the World Anti Doping Association (WADA) and the US Anti Doping Agency (USADA). Dr. Stray-Gundersen is the Sports Science Director for the US Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA), and continues to lead Human Performance and Altitude Camps for Olympic Athletes, Masters Athletes, as well as Navy Seals to optimize performance. He runs The SG Performance Medicine Center and Sport Technologies for Maximal Athletic Performance, overall fitness, weight loss, and recovery in Frisco, Texas, and the center in Park City, Utah, located inside The Center of Excellence USSA Building.

Serving as an authority on human performance, rules, and safety of athletes, Dr. Stray-Gundersen has served on a number of International Medical Committees including the International Olympic Committee Medical Committee, the International Ski Federation Medical Committee, the International Biathlon Committee, International Skating Union, World Anti Doping Agency, the US Anti Doping Agency, FIFA, and NASA.

Dr. Stray-Gundersen gave the lecture above at the University of Tokyo at the annual KAATSU Symposium at the invitation of KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, MD, PhD in 2014.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

How Do I Use My KAATSU Cycle 2.0 For My Arms?





After people receive their new KAATSU Cycle 2.0, they often ask for guidance looking for specific exercises to do.

Q1. How do I use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0?
Q2. What exercises should I do?
Q3. How am I supposed to workout?

The answers and recommendations entirely depend on what goals you are looking to achieve.

C1. I just want to get fit.
C2. I want to get stronger.
C3. I want to reduce the pain in my shoulders.

Each of these goals can require a number of specific exercises performed daily under the guidance of a personal trainer. Or, alternatively and strategically, you are easily use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for systemic gains in strength, muscle tone, flexibility and mobility.

The easiest and most convenient form of KAATSU exercises for the upper body are the Standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the arms. As you turn the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 on, simply do repeated sets of Hand Clenches (i.e., repeatedly and slowly opening and closing your hands while spreading out your fingers), Biceps Curls (i.e., with a clenched fist, bring your hand slowly and repeatedly up towards your shoulder), and Triceps Extensions (i.e., with a clenched fist, move your hand slowly and repeatedly downwards and backwards).

You can also do any number of upper body stretches or calisthenics including standing close to a wall and pushing your body away from the wall (i.e., Wall Push-ups). You can do the Wall Push-ups during the 30 seconds when the KAATSU Air Bands are inflated with air - and then rest while the bands are deflated. You can also do Desk Push-ups or Regular Push-ups, which will be significantly more difficult, depending on the level of intensity that you wish.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

How Do I Use My KAATSU Cycle 2.0 For My Legs And Core?





After people receive their new KAATSU Cycle 2.0, they often ask for guidance and look for specific exercises to do.

Q1. How do I use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0?
Q2. What exercises should I do?
Q3. How am I supposed to workout?

The answers and recommendations entirely depend on what goals you are looking to achieve.

C1. I just want to get fit.
C2. I want to get stronger.
C3. I don't want my back to always hurt.

Each of these goals can require a number of specific exercises performed daily under the guidance of a personal trainer. Or, alternatively and strategically, you are easily use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for systemic gains in strength, muscle tone, flexibility and mobility.

Let's assume that you prefer to work on your legs and core. In this case, you can put aside your KAATSU Air Bands for your arms for the moment and simply focus on using the longer and thicker KAATSU Air Bands for your legs.

Wrap the KAATSU Air Bands around your upper legs as high up on your groin as possible. You should wrap the bands around your legs while you are sitting comfortably in a chair. The bands should be placed on snugly so you can barely put a finger between the bands and your skin.




































1. Click on G (GROUP) on the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and L (LOW) on the top side of the unit to start the unit. The unit will automatically go through 8 repetitions of 30 seconds of pressure followed by 5 seconds of rest. The pressure starts at 80 SKU (Standard KAATSU Units) and increases each repetition by 10 SKU, ending on 150 SKU (see chart above). This will continue to 4 minutes and then automatically stop.

2. For the next cycle, click on G (GROUP) and the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and M (MEDIUM) on the top side of the unit to start your second cycle.

3. For the next cycle, click on G (GROUP) and the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and H (HIGH) on the top side of the unit to start your second cycle. You can continue increasing your pressure as you wish (e.g., PRO LOW, PRO MEDIUM, PRO HIGH).

4. During these cycles, you are simply walk ("KAATSU Walking") or do the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises. The Standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the legs include Toe Curls (as you sit comfortably without your shoes on), Toe Raises (as you sit comfortably without your shoes on), and Heel Raises (as you sit comfortably). The Advanced KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the legs include Standing Heel Raises (as you stand comfortably), Leg Curls (as you stand comfortably and raise one leg to your buttocks as you hold onto a chair or the wall), and Quarter Squats (as you squat slowly and comfortably up and down).

5. You can also do any number of stretches or calisthenic exercises.

6. For improved balance, you can wear the bands as you balance on one leg or walk with a book on your head. You can also pace back and forth on a soft yoga mat or walk barefooted on the sand.

7. If you want to do more difficult exercises, you can do Lunges with one leg until you reach muscular failure (and then switch legs), Burpees, or lie flat on your back and raise your feet slightly off the ground.

8. You can also do Step-ups on a box at your fitness gym, walk or jog on a treadmill, or use a spinning bicycle or recumbent bicycle for 10-15 minutes, alternatively modifying intensity.

9. For less-intensive exercises, you can simply sit straight up in a chair or couch with your hips near the edge. Slowly exhale and slowly lean forward, tightening your abdominal muscles as strongly as possible until your stomach is close to your legs. Hold and then slowly inhale air on your return to a sitting position with good posture. Repeat as desired.

Although it is not intuitive, the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs will result in healthful systemic effects that are felt and seen throughout your body, including your core and upper body.

Most individuals are not motivated to do planks, crunches and other forms of abdominal work. Instead, KAATSU users can do a number of simple KAATSU exercises to strengthen their lower back and tighten their core.

Core and lower back exercises can comprise of your entire KAATSU training session for the day. Alternatively, core and lower back exercises can be an addition to your typical KAATSU sessions.

Core & Lower Back #1 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot, balancing only on your other leg for as long as possible.
4. When your balance is lost, rest for 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
5. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
6. This act of balancing will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #2 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to the Optimal SKU.
3. Place a book on your head and walk slowly until the book falls off.
4. Rest 10-20 seconds and repeat the walk again two more times with the book on your head.
5. Walking straight slowly, especially on an uneven surface like a sandy beach, will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #3 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot while holding a water bottle in each hand.
4. Hold the water bottle in your outstretched arms and stand as long as possible on one leg.
5. When your balance is lost, rest 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
6. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
7. In order to make this exercise more difficult, move your outstretched arms left and right, and up and down in an asymmetric manner while balancing on one foot.

Core & Lower Back #4 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Do planks as usual.
4. Alternatively, tighten the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms at your Optimal SKU and do planks as normal.

Core & Lower Back #5 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly bring one leg one up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knee with your arms to stretch your back.
4. Repeat as desired.
5. Continue to lie on your back and slowly pull both your legs up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knees with your arms to stretch your back.
6. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #6 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift your hips off the floor and hold. Bring your hips to the ground and repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #7 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift both your feet off the ground and hold. Repeat as desired.
4. Lie on your back, lift both your feet off the ground, and kick your feet slightly off the ground. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #8 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly pandiculate (i.e., stretch and stiffen your trunk and limbs, extending your toes, feet, arms and hands as you do upon waking).
4. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #9 Exercise
1. KAATSU Aqua Sit-ups are used by competitive aquatic athletes with a Bosu Ball. 2. Start horizontal in the water while grabbing onto a Bosu Ball; then climb on top of the Bosu Ball. Do 3 sets to failure.



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU Lecture Series - Peter T. Lansbury, PhD















Peter T. Lansbury, PhD is the Chief Scientific Officer at Lysosomal Therapeutics and Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School who was one of the early adopters of KAATSU.

Professor Lansbury received his AB (cum laude) in chemistry from Princeton University in 1980 and subsequently received his PhD in organic chemistry from Harvard University in 1985 under the direction of Nobel laureate E. J. Corey. His postdoctoral fellowship was spent at the Rockefeller University, working with the late Tom Kaiser. In 1988, he accepted a position as assistant professor of chemistry at MIT and was promoted to associate professor in 1993.

He moved to his current position at the Center of Neurologic Diseases in 1996 and was promoted to professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School in 2004. During this time, he founded the Laboratory for Drug Discovery in Neurodegeneration and the Morris K. Udall NIH Parkinson’s Disease Research Center of Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, which he directed for 10 years.

He was the founder of Link Medicine, and served as its chief scientific officer from 2005 until its sale to AstraZeneca in 2012. He is currently chief scientific officer of Lysosomal Therapeutics, Inc., a company focused on developing disease-modifying therapeutics for Parkinson’s and related diseases.

Professor Lansbury gave the lecture above at the University of Tokyo at the annual KAATSU Symposium at the invitation of KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, MD, PhD. in 2014.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Real Warriors, Weekend Warriors



KAATSU Global's John Doolittle does a lot with the time he has available to him.

But every year, the former Navy SEAL Captain donates his time and talents to help raise money and awareness for the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim, a 5 km bay swim held in Tampa Bay, Florida as a charity fundraiser for the Navy SEAL Foundation.

Not many swimming competitions kick off when Supermen bolt down from the high heavens and parachute down right smack on the starting line. But The Frogman Swim is as unique as its volunteer directors and organizers. And few swims - if any - raise money like the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim does.

Nominated for the 2019 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year [vote here], the swim outdid itself again last weekend. It is on track to raise well over US$725,000 with fewer than 200 swimmers.

This year's overall winner was 1996 and 2000 Olympic gold medalist, mother and still-speedy nearly 40-year-old Brooke Bennett, but the real winners included everyone involved from the Gold Star Families to the Navy SEAL Foundation.

For more event information or to donate, visit www.tampabayfrogman.com

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Relieving Back Pain, Strengthening The Back With KAATSU





















Back pain is one of the most common ailments and complaints people experience, especially as they age, gain weight or become increasingly sedentary.

Back pain comes in myriad forms: muscle ache, shooting/stabbing pain, pain/numbness/tingling radiating down the legs, increasing pain with bending, lifting, standing or walking, or pain that improves with reclining.

Whether the back pain is caused by muscle or ligament strain, bulging or ruptured disks, arthritis, scoliosis, or osteoporosis, KAATSU users often find relief by doing the following movements and protocols using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit and the KAATSU Air Bands:

KAATSU Cycle Arm Warm-up
* Snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms and do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.
* You can do simple movements of your arms that can include writing emails and sewing to non-weighted biceps curls and triceps extensions.

KAATSU Cycle Leg Warm-up
* Remove KAATSU Air Bands from your arms and snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs.
* Do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures on your legs.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.

* You can do some or all of these simple movements:

** Sit up straight (as possible) in a chair, non-slouched with good posture your feet flat on the floor, shoulders back and torso engaged, looking forward while breathing comfortably.
** Stand up straight (as possible) and pace comfortably back and forth in your room. If you do this is a fitness room or gym, take off your shoes and walk on yoga mats or any other kind of soft, spongy surface.
** Stretch your lower back and legs in any number of ways. One particularly effective stretch is to slightly elevate your toes off the ground and bend forward at your waist, letting your arms hang to your feet. There is no need to strain yourself, just bend over comfortably.
** Do the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for your Legs (see here including Toe Curls, Toe Raises, Heel Raises, Standing Leg Curls, and Quarter Squats).

** With your feet shoulder width apart, stand comfortably while slightly bending your knees and holding water bottles in both your hands down at your sides. Lean slightly forward at an angle while maintaining a straight back. Do not move your hips while you lift your arms forward as high as possible. Repeat 5-10 times.

Key Points
* Be very well hydrated before and during the KAATSU Cycles.
* The color of your skin on your arms and legs should be a pinker or redder tone than normal while doing KAATSU. This indicates that your blood circulation is improved with the KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Remove immediately if your skin becomes clammy or cold or you feel lightheaded.
* You will quickly feel fatigue, much more quickly than if you did the same exercise without KAATSU Air Bands on your arms.
* Repeat this exercise daily or, if so motivated, twice per day (both in the morning and afternoon or evening).
* Place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on your limbs. Snugly means that you can put one finger between the KAATSU Air Bands and your skin - but not two or three fingers. If you can put two or three fingers between the bands and your skin, the bands should be manually tightened a bit more.
* Your back should gradually feel looser and more flexible. As this feeling improves, you can increase your pressure levels and range of motion - but it should all be done gradually and comfortably.


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

KAATSU For Shin Splints



























Young military recruits, new triathletes, distance runners or anyone beginning a new fitness program occasionally experience shin splints (medial tibial stress syndrome).

The pain runs along the inner edge of the shinbone (tibia) due to inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and bone tissue around the tibia. While resting, icing, stretching, and over-the-counter pain relievers are the most common treatments, doing KAATSU Cycles are also a faster way to return to a pain-free state and can help prevent shin splints in the first place.

The constant (or increased) pounding on pavement or wherever you are running overworks the muscles, tendons and bone tissue. Tenderness, soreness, swelling and pain occurs. If the intensity or distance continues, the shin splints can progress to a stress reaction or stress fracture.

Prevention
Because shin splints are caused by repetitive stress on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach the muscles to the bone, it is critical to strengthen these muscles, tendons, and bone tissue.

Athletes can start doing repeated KAATSU Cycles using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 (or KAATSU Wearables in the future) while walking (i.e., KAATSU Walking). It is recommended to place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on the upper legs (not allowing more than 2 fingers to put placed between the KAATSU Air Bands and the skin) and then do the first KAATSU Cycle on the GROUP LOW level while walking comfortably. This first cycle runs for 4 minutes.

When the first cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the GROUP MEDIUM level while walking comfortably. After 4 minutes, this second cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the GROUP HIGH level. At this point, the athlete can begin a slow jog or do faster (power) walking.

After the third cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the PRO LOW level while walking fast or jogging slowly. After 4 minutes, this cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the PRO MEDIUM level on the fifth cycle while jogging or walking as quickly as possible (depending on one's stamina).

For the last and sixth cycle, the pressure is increased to the PRO HIGH level.

Recovery
If you are already experiencing shin splints, you should do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles both before and after running. This can be in combination with icing, stretching and taking over-the-counter pain relievers. It is important to begin at a lower pressure (e.g., Group mode on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, and then proceed to higher pressures in the latter cycles).

Many athletes also find great relief in doing another set of 3-6 KAATSU Cycles less than an hour before going to bed at night.

Others also find additional relief in doing a set of 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their arms while doing repeated Hand Clenches, Biceps Curls and Triceps Extensions (i.e., KAATSU 3-Point Arm Exercises).

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, January 4, 2020

KAATSU Skin Care: Using KAATSU Before And After Getting A Tattoo






























Tattoo on arm after 3½ hours.






























Tattoo on arm after 5 hours.

KAATSU Cycles, properly applied, has always been good for pre-surgery preparations and post-surgery recovery, especially with sutures on the skin [see here and below].

Dave Carlson, a renowned water polo coach in Los Alamitos, California and a regular user of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, came up with the KAATSU tattoo protocol (the "Carlson Protocol").

Carlson has several tattoos and he understands very well the inflammation and pain that comes with a new tattoo.

But one hour before his most recent tattoo session, he used his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to do 3 progressive KAATSU Cycles on his legs followed by 4 progressive KAATSU Cycles on his arms. He had the tattoo above inked on his arm.

Then he did 3 KAATSU Cycles (Low, Medium, High) after the session was over. Then he went to his local gym and worked out with 3 additional KAATSU Cycles on Group Low (the lowest setting possible on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0).

He then took off the bandage 1½ hours after he got his new tattoo, washed with soap and water, and applied Aquaphor. To his surprise, he then took the photo above 3½ hours after the tattoo session was over.

He explained his impressions, "What is unusual is that there was very little or no swelling, my skin is not sensitive to the touch, and my skin under and near the tattoo is not sure or inflamed. My skin is normally sensitive and hurts to touch after I get a tattoo. The area around the tattoo normally rises for a few days after I get it. But with the KAATSU Cycle protocol, this is the least amount of swelling and pain that I have ever had after removing the bandage.

I mean, there is ZERO swelling. It looks like someone drew a picture with ink on my arm. My tattoo is usually puffy and the skin around it is red. But there is no inflammation - and ZERO pain.

Zero swelling and zero pain. I am not exaggerating when I say zero pain
."

The photo on left was taken 6½ hours after the tattoo session. Carlson's arm is engorged in blood in the middle of the 4th KAATSU Cycle. His first KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Low level (with 250 maximum SKU); the second KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Medium level (with 350 maximum SKU), the third KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU), and the fourth KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU).

KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato explained the mechanism behind this phenomenon that KAATSU users can experience. "We have found that KAATSU leads to a decrease in CRP, C-reactive protein which is a blood test marker for inflammation in the body. CRP levels increase in response to inflammation.

This is why people who have arthritis or are experiencing different kinds of pain - including getting a tattoo - report feeling significant relief after bouts of KAATSU.

While there is also an increase in HGH (Human Growth Hormone), nitric oxide, IGF-1 (insulin growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), KAATSU also has shown to decrease CRP.

Typically with pain comes inflammation and the CRP increases. But with KAATSU, the decrease in CRP and production of EPC (endothelial progenitor cell) help. EPC are cells that help regenerate the endothelial lining of your blood vessels
."

Repeated KAATSU Cycles has repeatedly shown to enhance the body's natural healing process, especially when the skin is cut, torn, broken or inked.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global