Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Recovering from Dislocations and Tears with KAATSU

Many athletes and other active people of various ages and backgrounds dislocate their shoulders or tear ligaments and tendons in course of their workouts or competitions.

Many of these individuals use the KAATSU Master, KAATSU Master 2.0 or KAATSU Nano products for their rehabilitation and recovery.

These are the key protocols that they follow to achieve rapid recovery:

1. Continue their existing physical therapy, using KAATSU to augment their recovery. That is, if they are doing 60 minutes of physical therapy, continue with the same movements and exercises, but add in KAATSU in the last 20-30 minutes.

2. Do KAATSU Cycle on both their arms and legs, regardless if the injury is in the lower body or upper body.

3. Be well-hydrated before and during KAATSU, and follow all standard KAATSU safety protocols.

4. Start with conservative Optimal pressures on the KAATSU Cycle (e.g., 200 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle of 3 minutes 20 seconds). Then repeat a series of KAATSU Cycles with higher and higher Optimal pressures (e.g., 250 SKU, 275 SKU, 300 SKU, 325 SKU), always checking for proper Capillary Refill Time.

5. Never move the limb, joint or muscle to the point of pain. Stop just short of discomfort in any movement and move the limb slowly and steadily as the physical therapy movements are being done.

6. The limbs should be fully engorged with blood so the skin becomes a deep pink, beefy red or even a purple color.

7. Never simultaneously put on the arm and leg bands. Work only the upper body with KAATSU and then the lower body.

8. As the body becomes more accustomed to KAATSU, the Optimal SKU pressures will naturally increase.

9. Pay close attention to the appropriate Base SKU levels. It is best to place on the KAATSU Air Bands on snugly so you cannot stick your fingers between the bands and your skin.

10. Email KAATSU Global at info@kaatsu-global.com if you have any specific questions.

Photos above show young athletes doing KAATSU Cycles and 77-year-old swimmer Mike Allford of Boston working on his partly torn rotator cuff.

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