Tuesday, January 29, 2019

KAATSU With Individuals With Varicose Veins



Time and time again, male and female users of KAATSU have seen their varicose veins either go away or be minimized.

While eliminating or reducing their varicose veins was not their original goal, the cosmetic effect of this outcome has been greatly appreciated by many from women who have just given birth to older adults of both ages.

To understand why this improvement occurs, it is important to understand how and why varicose veins appear in the first place.

Varicose Vein Causes
Blood flows into your legs through arteries and returns back to the heart in your veins. Veins have valves inside them to stop the blood from flowing the wrong direction. These valves can lose their elasticity, stop working properly or otherwise become weak or damaged.

Weak or damaged valves in your legs can lead to varicose veins. While your heart is strong enough to efficiently pump blood through your torso, it needs help to enable blood to flow to and from your lower body. To return blood to your heart, the veins in your legs must work against gravity.

Muscle contractions in your lower legs act as pumps and the elastic vein walls help blood return to your heart. Tiny valves in your veins open as blood flows toward your heart. The valves then close to stop blood from flowing backward. If these valves are weak or damaged, blood can flow backward and pool in the vein, causing the veins to stretch or twist.

Aging causes the valves in your veins to become weaker and eventually that leads to the valves allowing some blood to flow back into your veins where it collects instead of flowing up to your heart.

Varicose veins are twisted, enlarged veins. The veins that most commonly affected are veins in your legs because standing and walking upright increases the pressure in the veins of your lower body.

For many people, varicose veins and spider veins — smaller, thinner, more mild variation of varicose veins that can also be found on your face — are more of a cosmetic worry. For some people, varicose veins causes pain and discomfort and sometimes lead to more serious problems that should be addressed by your personal physician.

So if you have veins in your legs that are dark purple or blue in color, look like they are twisted and bulging, people are often advised to ; exercise, elevate their legs or wear compression stockings that can help you ease the pain of varicose veins and may prevent them from getting worse.

Recommendations
Medical professionals understand that individuals cannot completely prevent varicose veins, but it is widely know that improving blood circulation and muscle tone can reduce the risk of developing varicose veins and getting additional ones. This self-treatment can include exercise, proper nutrition, avoiding obesity, frequently changing your sitting and standing position if you have a tendency to not move much at work or home.

KAATSU Benefits
This is how KAATSU can useful and effective.

There are two primary outcomes and mechanism: (1) Improved blood flow and (2) Increased vascular elasticity. Both which help the valves in your legs function normally and eliminate or reduce the backed-up blood near these areas.

Improved Blood Flow
Research at the University of Tokyo Hospital showed that regular intermittent modification of venous flow (from your limbs back to your torso) with the KAATSU Air Bands and KAATSU equipment on the legs leads to blood shifting to the lower part of the body while blood flow is temporarily decreased in the parts of the body above your heart. Your brain perceives this minor shift and, as a result, directs your heart to increase blood flow. The increased blood flow improves blood circulation throughout the entire body and the blood in the peripheral arteries flows more smoothly.

Increased Vascular Elasticity
As we age, the natural elasticity of our capillaries, veins and arteries is reduced. When blood vessel walls lose its elasticity, the smooth circulation of blood is reduced. When the venous flow is intermittently modified with KAATSU equipment on your legs, the blood flow is temporarily reduced in your upper body and the blood vessels throughout your body attempts to supply an increased amount of blood.

This is a natural phenomenon and is what the human body and brain have evolved to do.

When the KAATSU Air Bands are released (every 20 seconds in the KAATSU Cycle mode), this mechanical modification (alternately creating constriction and dilation) stimulates the blood vessels and enhances blood vessel elasticity - even if you are sitting down and relaxing. When venous flow is modified, blood must be pushed harder to bring sufficient amount of blood to each cell in your body.

In addition, there are two other natural physical phenomena that occur: (1) vascular endothelial cells generate nitric oxide that helps to restore your natural vascular elasticity, and (2) new blood vessels are formed to efficiently supply a limited amount of blood.

These effects lead to the improved valve function and elimination or significant reduction of varicose veins.

How to Use KAATSU with Varicose Veins
There are 3 different ways to improve your varicose veins:

1. The easiest and most convenient exercise is to simply sit and do several (3-6) KAATSU Cycles with the KAATSU leg bands on. You can do this anytime you are working in your office, watching TV or relaxing anywhere. The KAATSU Cycle pressure can start conservatively (i.e., a low SKU) and then gradually increase with each subsequent KAATSU Cycle (e.g., 150 SKU for the first Cycle, 200 SKU for the second Cycle, 225 for the third Cycle, etc.).

2. The next best and more effective exercise is to do the standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises with the KAATSU leg bands on while using the KAATSU Cycle mode: (1) Heel Raises done slowly while sitting, (2) Leg Raises while standing, and (3) Non-lock Partial Squats. See videos above for ideas and suggested exercises that can be done in your home or office. You can also do a variety of other exercises [see video below].

3. The best and most optimal exercise is KAATSU Walking. With the KAATSU Nano or next-generation KAATSU Wearables, you can walk with the KAATSU leg bands on while using the KAATSU Cycle mode. The KAATSU Walking can be on a treadmill or outside anywhere or indoors in your home or office.

Contraindications
If you have cardiac issues or serious vascular issues, consult your physician before beginning any exercise program.

However, the KAATSU Cycle mode has been used safely and without contraindications with over 7,000 individuals with documented cardiac issues (heart bypass, heart attack) or who have survived strokes.

It is important and strictly recommended to only use the KAATSU Cycle mode with anyone with health concerns. All of the standard KAATSU protocols are essential to follow: use conservative pressure, be well hydrated before and during KAATSU sessions, always start with the KAATSU Cycle mode to help warm-up the body and vascular system, and move slowly and conservatively (i.e., not vigorously).



The standard KAATSU core and lower back exercises with the KAATSU Cycle mode can also be useful for individuals with varicose veins.

Core & Lower Back #1 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Sit straight up in a chair or couch with your hips near the edge.
4. Slowly exhale and slowly lean forward, tightening your abdominal muscles as strongly as possible until your stomach is close to your legs.
5. Hold and then slowly inhale air on your return to a sitting position with good posture.
6. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #2 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot, balancing only on your other leg for as long as possible.
4. When your balance is lost, rest for 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
5. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
6. This act of balancing will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #3 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to the Optimal SKU.
3. Place a book on your head and walk slowly until the book falls off.
4. Rest 10-20 seconds and repeat the walk again two more times with the book on your head.
5. Walking straight slowly, especially on an uneven surface like a sandy beach, will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #4 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot while holding a water bottle in each hand.
4. Hold the water bottle in your outstretched arms and stand as long as possible on one leg.
5. When your balance is lost, rest 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
6. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
7. In order to make this exercise more difficult, move your outstretched arms left and right, and up and down in an asymmetric manner while balancing on one foot.

Core & Lower Back #5 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Do planks as usual.
4. Alternatively, tighten the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms at your Optimal SKU and do planks as normal.

Core & Lower Back #6 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly bring one leg one up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knee with your arms to stretch your back.
4. Repeat as desired.
5. Continue to lie on your back and slowly pull both your legs up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knees with your arms to stretch your back.
6. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #7 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift your hips off the floor and hold. Bring your hips to the ground and repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #8 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift both your feet off the ground and hold. Repeat as desired.
4. Lie on your back, lift both your feet off the ground, and kick your feet slightly off the ground. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #9 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly pandiculate (i.e., stretch and stiffen your trunk and limbs, extending your toes, feet, arms and hands as you do upon waking).
4. Repeat as desired.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Break One Limb, KAATSU The Others





KAATSU users often ask how KAATSU can be safely used as part of their rehabilitation of a broken limb, especially when the injured arm or leg must be keep immobilized as it heals.

Similar to Olympic silver medalist Todd Lodwick did in the month prior to the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games when he broke his humerus and torn his ligaments in his left arm, KAATSU users can perform KAATSU twice per day, primarily using the KAATSU Cycle mode on their other three healthy limbs.

The standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises in the KAATSU Cycle mode can be used: Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions on the arms plus Heel Raises + Leg Curls + Non-lock Partial Quarter Squats on the legs. KAATSU Walking or KAATSU Aqua Walking can be performed as one very effective alternative in the injury is in the arms. The KAATSU Cycles, ideally, should be performed in the mornings and then within one hour of bedtime.

The effects are best if the movement of the healthy limbs is slow and steady. Ideally, the muscles in movement should be contracted in both the positive and negative directions.

The reason why KAATSU on the healthy limbs is effective is because KAATSU has systemic effects all over the body, including in the injured limb - even if KAATSU is not done on that limb.

At the Indiana University School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Center for Translational Musculoskeletal Research and the University of Indianapolis Department of Kinesiology, Dr. Alan Mikesky and his research team researched the crossover effects of KAATSU [see Modified KAATSU Training: Adaptations and Subject Perceptions here]. In his research, Professor Mikesky was looking to confirm the systemic effects of KAATSU.

The researchers applied KAATSU Air Bands on only one arm of subjects and tested the strength, girth, tomography scans along with RPE (Rated Perceived Exertion scale) of both arms of the subjects.

The research team correctly did KAATSU and measured both the Base SKU (which they called “Cuff Tightness Pressure in mm Hg"and Optimal SKU (which they called “Cuff Inflation Pressure in mm Hg”) levels.

It should be noted that the SKU levels were conservative for relatively young subjects. The subjects started at 10 Base SKU in Week 1 and increased to 30 Base SKU by Week 8; they started at 90 Base SKU in Week 1 and increased to 180 Base SKU by Week 8. Both the KAATSU arm and the non-KAATSU arm girth increased (measured in cm between Week 0 and Week 8):

Non-KAATSU Arm (cm) girth:
Week 0: 22.7 cm
Week 2: 24.3 cm
Week 4: 24.9 cm
Week 6: 25.7 cm
Week 8: 26.1 cm

KAATSU Arm (cm) girth:
Week 0: 23.0 cm
Week 2: 23.2 cm
Week 4: 24.5 cm
Week 6: 25.4 cm
Week 8: 26.1 cm

The research showed how doing KAATSU on one limb can have crossover (systemic) effects on the other limb - a very important goal for individuals with one injured limb who is trying to recover.

In the video above, this effect was practically demonstrated was with 2010 Olympic silver medalist Todd Lodwick who broke his left arm and torn his ligaments 28 days before the 2014 Winter Olympics. With KAATSU done on his non-injured limbs, he was able to compete admirably well in both the ski jumping and the Nordic combined events after only 5 weeks of KAATSU.

During his rehabilitation, the staff at the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Association noted that Lodwick was getting too muscular after a few weeks of KAATSU - despite his broken bone and torn ligaments and doing no weights or traditional strength training exercises. In response, his SKU levels was reduced and he stretched more and did low-pressure, post-workout KAATSU Cycles so his muscle hypertrophy was not accelerated (see above). Personally, Lodwick liked the effects and ultimately was able to compete.

In summary, doing KAATSU on healthy limbs can have direct crossover benefits to the recovery, strength and girth of an injured limb or core.

Another previous study conducted in Japan is entitled Cross-Transfer Effects of Resistance Training with Blood Flow Restriction (see here).

Silver medalist Todd Lodwick is shown above doing similar KAATSU training after his skiing accident and was able to rehabilitate and recover quickly enough to compete in the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Friday, January 18, 2019

KAATSU Walking, Beneficial To Horses And Humans


























Research on the effects of KAATSU has been conducted with men and women of all ages, abilities and conditions. An interesting variety of research has also included equine subjects (i.e., horses), mice, rats, and goats from Japan to the United States.

Research has been conducted at the University of Tokyo Hospital and Osaka University in Japan, at Peking University and Jilin University in China, at the Harvard Medical School, University of Missouri, University of Oklahoma and Rutgers University in the United States, at the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in São Paulo, Brazil, and dozens other universities and academic research institutions.

The photos above show Chinese scientists attaching standard KAATSU Air Bands on the hind legs of goats in northern China under the auspices of China's State General Administration of Sports, the government agency responsible for sports in China that also administers the Chinese Olympic Committee.

Kenneth McKeever, Ph.D., FACSM serves as the Associate Director of Research and is a Professor of Animal Sciences at The Rutgers Equine Science Center. The Center is part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and is dedicated to better horse care through research and education to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry.

Since 1995, Professor McKeever has proceeded to build, develop, and coordinate one of the most active Equine Exercise Physiology laboratories in the USA. One of the most interesting studies that Professor McKeever conducted in collaboration with his colleagues Professors Abe, Kearns, Filho and Sato of the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at the Tokyo Metropolitan University and the Department of Ischemic Circulatory Physiology at The University of Tokyo in Japan.

The study is entitled Muscle, tendon, and somatotropin responses to the restriction of muscle blood flow induced by KAATSU-walk training, published in Equine Exercise Physiology.

The researchers delved into the efficacy of KAATSU that has been demonstrated in human athletes, both as a therapeutic method as well as a training aid. The purpose of their study was to investigate the effects of slow walk training combined with restriction of muscle blood flow (KAATSU) on muscle and tendon size.

They studied 6 healthy, unfit Standardbred mares performed walking (240 meters/minute for 10 minutes and then a 5-minute recovery) with KAATSU, and 6 mares performed walking without KAATSU. A specially designed elastic band (manufactured by KAATSU Japan using the original KAATSU Master device) was placed at the most proximal position of the forelegs and inflated to a pressure of 200-230 mmHg throughout the walking and recovery sessions. [Note: the KAATSU Air Bands were the same model and type that were used by humans and with the goats in China).

The training was conducted once a day, 6 days/week for 2 weeks. Skeletal muscle thickness and tendon thickness were measured using B-mode ultrasound at baseline and after 2 weeks of training. Venous blood samples were obtained before the first acute exercise and 5, 15 and 60 minutes afterwards. Serum somatotropin concentration was determined using a commercially available equine-specific ELISA kit.

The professors found that the acute increase in plasma somatotropin was 40% greater (P<0.05) in the KAATSU-walk group than in the Control-walk group 5 minutes after exercise and remained elevated (P<0.05) at 15 and 60 minutes post exercise compared with the Control-walk group. After 2 weeks of training, muscle thickness increased (P<0.05) 3.5% in the KAATSU-walk group, but did not change in the Control-walk group (0.7%). Tendon thickness did not change (P>0.05) in either group.

They concluded that these data demonstrate that KAATSU can induce muscle hypertrophy in horses and suggest that KAATSU may provide significant therapeutic/rehabilitative value in horses, as has been shown in man.

In 2017, Dr. William Ursprung conducted a KAATSU Walking study at Texas A&M University entitled The Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Training on VO2Max and 1.5 Mile Run Performance on humans (published in the International Journal of Exercise Science), not the equine subjects that Professor McKeever had done at Rutgers.

Dr. Ursprung utilized the KAATSU Nano device (a smaller, more portable equivalent of the KAATSU Master that Professor McKeever used) and the same KAATSU Air Bands that were used on the Standardbred mares in Rutgers.

Dr. Ursprung used the KAATSU Air Bands to safely maintain arterial inflow to the leg muscles while preventing venous outflow. He writes, "Blood flow restriction training with resistance has been shown to improve muscular power, sprinting speed, strength, hypertrophy and endurance. Non-resistance training methods using [KAATSU], such as walking, may increase strength and hypertrophy however the effects on aerobic capacity are less uncertain and the research in this area is limited.

Using 10 young, fit, well-trained male military personnel, Dr. Ursprung evaluated the effects of 3 weeks of [KAATSU Walking] on VO2max, 1.5-mile run times, and muscular size. He recorded the pre- and post-measurements of VO2max, 1.5-mile run times, and thigh muscle cross sectional area and found that KAATSU Walking resulted in significant improvements in VO2max (p=.034), significant decreases in 1.5-mile run time (p=.024) and significant increases in thigh muscle cross sectional area (p=.016).

So while Professor McKeever found that limited KAATSU Walking can induce muscle hypertrophy in horses and concluded that KAATSU may provide significant therapeutic/rehabilitative value in horses, Dr. Ursprung concluded that similarly limited KAATSU Walking can improve the aerobic capacity, endurance and muscular size at low training volumes and intensities among humans.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, January 17, 2019

The KAATSU Effect: Walking After 10 Days

Follow-up to the posting regarding a cracked calcaneus (heel) bone: see here.

Olympic swim coach Chris Morgan recently fractured his right calcaneus bone (heel). The injury resulted in a crack about 75% through the entire bone.

Morgan did KAATSU Cycles on both his arms and legs while in a boot, on crunches and taking pain medications for the last two weeks at his home. The doctor instructed him not to walk or apply pressure on the healing bone until he cleared him. "It was painful and there is no way to walk on it, but I could sit up and do KAATSU on my arms and legs."

After doing KAATSU Cycles in the morning and evening every day, he was able to stand and walk on this cracked - but healing - heel after 10 days. And walking fully without a boot or crutches within 15 days. According to the standard prognosis, this kind of healing is unheard of.

"In the emergency room, the doctor said to me, 'Oh that must be so painful. You cracked 75% of heel.' He was right. But I knew that I had to start rehabbing with KAATSU as soon as I got home," Morgan recalled.

"But after only 10 days, I surprised my doctor by being able to stand and walk on my heel. He asked what I was doing. Admittedly, standing and walking is not yet completely pain-free, but I was able to reduce his estimate from 6 weeks to 10 days."

Morgan's rehabilitation includes two separate KAATSU sessions per day: a morning session and an evening session where he does several KAATSU Cycles on both his arms and legs.

Morgan explains, “The doctor told me to be completely off my injured foot for 6 weeks. I did KAATSU daily - twice daily. Based on my quick healing of my broken ribs, I guessed that my bone should be healed enough to start walking within 2 weeks with KAATSU. Well, being able to walk only took 10 days of KAATSU Cycling – and every day feels even better."

Podiatrist Dr. Lyle Nalli explains, "The calcaneus is the most vascular bone in the foot and can crack easily, but with its thin cortex and sparse inner bone pattern, can heal the fastest off all the foot bones. KAATSU, as it regulates blood flow, etc., speeds up the bone's healing rate."

After 15 days of twice-daily KAATSU Cycles done in the morning and evening, Morgan was able to walk without crutches and without a walking boot, vastly increasing his mobility within 2 weeks while his physician had predicted he would be only able to stand on his heel after 6 weeks.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

61-year-old Military Veteran & Stroke Survivor Before & After KAATSU



Before: Mitch's Timed Up & Go on 15 December 2018



After: Mitch's Timed Up & Go on 15 January 2019



Before Mitch started a KAATSU Cycle program at home on 15 December 2018.



After Mitch did 15 KAATSU Cycle upper body sessions over a 4-week period at home on 15 January 2019.

Overview
Mitch is a 61-year-old Marine veteran in Colorado who had an ischemic stroke 9 years ago at his home and 3 subsequent heart attacks. He is designated as a Do Not Resuscitate patient. His right side is nearly paralyzed, he has a torn right rotator cuff, he uses a wheelchair, his voice is significantly limited, but he remains overwhelmingly positive and is friendly with his neighbors. He has been treated by medical professionals and VA staff for the past decade. He regularly does a variety of physical therapy exercises and wheels himself around the neighborhood using his left arm.

KAATSU Usage
Mitch has used KAATSU 3-4 times per week for last 4 weeks (beginning on December 15th 2018) in the comfort of his home, while using the KAASTU Cycle mode with the help of his 62-year-old wife and performing a variety of standard physical therapeutic movements.

Benefits (see videos above)
1. Mitch’s fingers on his right hand are much more relaxed and flexible with a much looser grip.
2. Mitch can move his right arm with significantly greater range of motion.
2. Mitch feels significantly less pain in his right hand and arm.
3. Mitch can now feel human touch throughout his right arm that he could not feel before.
4. Mitch can complete a Timed Up and Go test 9% faster (1 minute 32 seconds vs. 1 minute 43 seconds).

KAATSU Recommendations
1. Mitch should continue the same exercises he currently does with the KAATSU Air Bands on.
2. Mitch can increase his use of KAATSU to twice per day: do KAATSU Cycles in the morning hours and do KAATSU Cycles as part of his 9:30 pm evening KAATSU sessions (currently doing evening only).
3. Mitch can add KAATSU Training to his evening sessions (i.e., detach the tubes and walk or do upper body movements in the KAATSU Training mode for no more than 15 minutes while untethered).
4. Mitch can practice handwriting with his right hand while conducting KAATSU cycles on his arms.
5. In order to develop greater strength and range of motion in his legs, Mitch can start 'Prone Upper Leg Contraction and Leg Lift Exercises' while conducting KAATSU Cycles on his legs while in the horizontal position.

KAATSU Advantages versus Traditional Physical Therapy
1. Ease & Convenience of Use
Mitch and his wife are non-medical professionals who quickly learned how to safely use KAATSU in the comfort of their home where Mitch can experience the benefits and convenience of KAATSU.

2. Safety
Despite having a stroke and 3 heart attacks and a torn rotator cuff, KAATSU is safely used by a 61-year-old veteran. This record is consistent with KAATSU’s usage in 32 countries around the world by over 20 million users.

3. Cost Savings
Assume the cost of a home visit by a VA professional is $100 (salary + benefits + travel expenses) per visit. If Mitch does KAATSU twice per day for 300 days per year, the cost of a KAATSU Wearable device amortized over 2 years (1,200 sessions) is $0.50 per KAATSU session (i.e., $600 ÷ 1200 = $0.50 / session). $100 vs. $0.50 per session presents unprecedented cost savings.

4. Physical Improvement
Video provides visual evidence of physical improvement after 15 uses of KAATSU.

5. Psychological Boost
With improved physical strength, range of motion and muscle tone, and a greater hormonal response, the mental outlook of a paralyzed individual will improve. Being able to sign checks, move both arms at will, walk to the bathroom without a wheelchair, and other activities likely lead to greater confidence, greater motivation, and a greater self-belief to continue further physical improvement.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Sunday, January 13, 2019

How The Japanese Prepare For The Olympics



Courtesy of The Olympics On The Record.

Most sports fans around the world know or have heard about the achievements and unprecedented Olympic record of Usain Bolt, the world's most successful sprint runner.

Most sports fans around the world also do not necessarily assign raw flat-out speed with Japanese runners who do not appear to have the natural body types for speed like their competitors in the Caribbean nations like Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago, the United States, Canada and the African and European nations.

But many sports fans also do not know that the Japanese placed a solid second in the men's 4 x 100m relay in the track & field competition during the 2016 Rio Olympics (with Ryota Yamagata, Shota Iizuka, Yoshihide Kiryu and Asuka Cambridge) - a race that people do not equate with Japanese prowess.

"We have observed the most recent methodologies, strategies, technologies and analyses that the Japanese have incorporated into their Olympic preparations - for a number of sports and disciplines," observed Steven Munatones, a frequent visitor to Japan. "Instead of making excuses that they are not as tall, strong or powerful like most of their athletic competitors, it is interesting to see coaches, trainers and athletes accept their DNA as is and then fine tune their preparations through innovation, patience, hard work, incremental improvement (called kaizen), and KAATSU for athletic performance gains and KAATSU Cycle for recovery and rehabilitation."

It will be interesting to see the results of this preparation - supported and encouraged by the Japanese government and its technologically-oriented corporations like Mizuno - at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, as the Japanese have done for their previous Olympic campaigns (see above).

"It will be very interesting because there will be some very visible, head-to-head races at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in various events between smaller, lighter, less powerful Japanese athletes who use KAATSU and their taller, stronger and more powerful foreign competitors from Canada, the United States and European countries who do not use KAATSU - or whose coaches do not accept the incorporation of blood flow moderation modalities into their training, commented Munatones.

"The proof of the benefits will be on the podium at the end of these races."

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Reducing Jet Lag and Battling Insomnia







































Many KAATSU users, including KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, use their KAATSU equipment following the standard KAATSU protocols to reduce the effects of jet lag and battle insomnia when they travel internationally or cross several time zones.

Steven Munatones explains important points regarding KAATSU use before, during and after airplane travel:

›› Be very well-hydrated before doing KAATSU Cycles in the airplane or before takeoff at the airport in order to help reduce your jet lag.
›› Do KAATSU Cycles and KAATSU Wellness Exercises in your hotel room if possible before going to bed on your first few evenings in your new location.
›› Always focus on doing KAATSU Cycles after setting your appropriate Base SKU (10-30 SKU) pressure and identifying your Optimal SKU pressure (50-400 SKU).
›› You can be conservative with your pressure. The effects will still be evident despite a lower-than-normal pressure.
›› Rest at least 30 seconds between each set and each exercise.
›› There is no need to go to failure with these protocols; the goal is to become relaxed.
›› Always follow the standard KAATSU safety protocols (e.g., always have Capillary Refill Time faster than 2- 3 seconds with no occlusion and no numbness in your feet or legs after setting the appropriate Base SKU and Optimal SKU pressures).
›› Ideally, do your KAATSU Cycles before you board the airplane.

Upper Body Jet Lag Exercises:
1. Place the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms.
2. Do 2-4 KAATSU Cycles, ideally within 30-60 minutes of boarding the airplane.
3. You can do all or any the following KAATSU exercises while sitting in your seat during flight:
* Forward Shoulder Rolls
* Backward Shoulder Rolls
* Head Rotations
* Tricep Muscle Stretches
* Deltoid Muscle Stretches
* Arm Rest Press Downs
* Isometric Contractions
4. Do 20-30 Forward Shoulder Rolls in a steady motion while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while your KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat as desired.
5. Do 20-30 Backward Shoulder Rolls in a steady motion while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while your KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat as desired.
6. Slowly roll the head forwards and backwards. Then slowly roll your head to the left and then to the right. Then slowly roll your head in a clockwise direction and then in a counterclockwise direction while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while the KAATSU Air Bands are deflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode.
Note: Skip this exercise if rolling your head forwards, backwards, left, right, clockwise or counterclockwise causes dizziness.
7. Stretch your triceps muscles on your left and right arms while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while the KAATSU Air Bands are deflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode.
8. Stretch your deltoid muscles on left and right shoulders while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while the KAATSU Air Bands are deflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode.
9. Do isometric exercises like placing both hands on your arm rests and press down for a few seconds while contracting your muscles. Rest and relax, then repeat.
10. Place the palms of your hands together and push your hands together for a few seconds. Then, rest, relax and repeat.
11. Grasp the fingers of your hands and pull your hands apart for a few seconds. Then rest, relax and repeat.
12. Stretch your upper body or torso as you desire and are able.

Lower Body Jet Lag Exercises:
Note: Doing KAATSU on your legs is much easier in a business or first class seat and most difficult or impossible while in the middle seat in economy class.
1. Place the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs.
2. Do 2-4 KAATSU Cycles, ideally within 30-60 minutes of boarding the airplane.
3. You can do all or any the following KAATSU exercises while sitting in your seat during flight:
* Heel Raises
* Leg Extensions
* Inward Leg Squeezes
* Outward Leg Squeezes
* Isometric Contractions
4. Slowly do 10-20 Heel Raises in a steady motion while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while your KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat as desired.
5. Slowly do 10-15 Leg Extensions in a steady motion while your KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while your KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat as desired.
6. Place your hands on your inner thighs and slowly push outwards as you push your legs inwards against the force of your hands while the KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while the KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat the Inward Leg Squeezes as desired.
7. Place your hands on your outer thighs and slowly push inwards as you push your legs outwards against the force of your hands while the KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode. Breathe deeply. Relax while the KAATSU Air Bands are deflated. Repeat the Outward Leg Squeezes as desired.
8. Contract your upper leg muscles (quadriceps and hamstrings) while the KAATSU Air Bands are inflated in the KAATSU Cycle mode and repeat.

Some of these exercises are demonstrated below. These same exercises can be done in your office while as work to relieve stress and get some exercise during the day when you are sitting and being sedentary all day long.







Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Crack In The Calcaneus, Healing With KAATSU

Olympic swim coach Chris Morgan fractured his right calcaneus bone (heel) while falling on a concrete step.

"In the emergency room, the doctor said to me, 'Oh that must be so painful. You cracked 75% of heel.' He was right. But I knew that I had to start rehabbing with KAATSU as soon as I got home," Morgan recalled. "I did the same rehab doing KAATSU when I cracked my ribs during a mud run. The doctors and x-ray technicians at Harvard where I was coaching at the time could not believe how fast my ribs healed. Every since that time, I have been a huge KAATSU believer."

Morgan was given a boot, crunches and pain medications and told not to walk or apply pressure on the healing bone until he cleared him. "It was painful and there is no way to walk on it, but I could sit up and do KAATSU on my arms and legs."

Morgan's rehabilitation includes two separate KAATSU sessions per day: a morning session and an evening session where he does several KAATSU Cycles on both his arms and legs.

Morning KAATSU Session:
* 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on arms doing the KAATSU 3-point exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions), performed slowly and steadily without weights or resistance bands

* 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on legs while contracting the quadriceps and hamstrings and doing leg extensions while sitting, performed slowly and steadily

Evening KAATSU Session (ideally 1 hour before bedtime:
* 2-3 KAATSU Cycles on arms doing the KAATSU 3-point exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions), performed slowly and steadily without weights or resistance bands
* 2-4 KAATSU Cycles on legs while relaxing and doing simple movements and stretching while sitting

Morgan explained his belief in KAATSU, "Dr. Sato [the KAATSU inventor] taught me that the more strongly muscle is exercised, the stronger the bones become. In other words, when there is less mechanical stress on our bones when you are bedridden or unable to move a body part that is in a cast or boot, the calcium that is stored in the bones is dissolved into your bloodstream, thus reducing bone strength.

We know through research that KAATSU changes - improves - levels of bone metabolic markers like BAP (bone alkali phosphatase). This research tells us that KAATSU elicits an acute response to suppress bone resorption and elicits a chronic effect in terms of encouraging bone formation - which was one reason why I believe my ribs healed so quickly and I expect my cracked heel will heal more quickly than my doctor expects.

The doctor told me to be off my injured foot for 6 weeks. I plan to be healed enough to start some walking within 2 weeks with KAATSU
."

Podiatrist Dr. Lyle Nalli explains, "The calcaneus is the most vascular bone in the foot and can crack easily, but with its thin cortex and sparse inner bone pattern, can heal the fastest off all the foot bones. KAATSU, as it regulates blood flow, etc., speeds up the bone's healing rate."

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global