Tuesday, July 30, 2019

What Happens In The Brain After Doing KAATSU?



Dr. Gary E. Strangman of the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues Doctors Vladimir Ivkovic, Quan Zhang, Aaron Baggish, Adam Cohen, Brian Nahed, Aaron Dentinger, Eric Bershad, and Eric Rosenthal looked into testing KAATSU equipment for its potential to reduce elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in astronauts and those in zero gravity conditions.

In their report, Dr. Strangman notes, "In a handful of astronauts, elevated ICP has been found days or months post‐flight (measured by lumbar puncture). This visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) condition varies notably across astronauts.

To date, no countermeasures have been tested for VIIP, although two countermeasures have been utilized in spaceflight to mitigate in‐flight cephalad fluid shifts (and related cardiovascular changes): (1) Russian‐made Braslet thigh cuffs, and (2) lower‐body negative pressure (LBNP). Both help redistribute blood from the upper body into the lower extremities, for a more Earth‐equivalent fluid distribution. Both have operational challenges, including availability, obtrusiveness, and calibration
."

So they studied and tested KAATSU.

His explanation is posted above.

In Japan at the University of Tokyo Hospital, its cardiologists also studied blood flow in the brain with subjects doing KAATSU and documented the resultant improved blood flow in the brain when subjects were tested with MRI scanners.



































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