Thursday, September 26, 2019

Past, Present and Future of KAATSU

The Moment of Discovery

In the fall of 1966, Yoshiaki Sato was 18 years old. He was attending a Buddhist memorial service and listening to the monk chanting sutras when, not unexpectedly, his legs went numb while sitting on the floor in the traditional Japanese position (“seiza” or 正座). With a straight back while kneeing on the tatami mat floor, he started to massage his calves in order to relieve the pain as his legs were bent underneath him.

While the discomfort continued during the long ceremony, he had a revelation.

Sato realized that his blood circulation was blocked in his calves as the weight of his body was directly upon his ankles. He reasoned that his legs must have gone to sleep as a result of the reduced blood flow to the periphery of his legs. Because his calves had the “pumped up” feeling after he experienced while bodybuilding, this was the initial KAATSU moment of inspiration where the original idea of blood flow moderation training began.

The swelling and hardness in his calves led to Sato asking himself the key question that began KAATSU.

I wonder if purposefully constricting blood flow could artificially replicate the physiological conditions of hard training. If this were true, could benefits be realized by only lifting no loads or only light loads instead of heavy weights?

The answer would be answered in the positive.

Years of Quiet Experimentation

Over the next seven years between 1966 and 1973 in the quiet of his own house, the young man from Tokyo diligently experimented on himself by applying different bicycle tubes, ropes and bands at different pressures on different parts of his body. He methodically kept track of what type of bands and pressures worked and what experiments did not.

As a monk in his local Buddhist temple, he began to see results that could not be explained given the physiological knowledge of the day. But the resulting effects of KAATSU were clear, although the medical explanations did not come for another decade.

After detailed and documented trial and error, Sato gradually developed effective protocols to safely restrict blood flow and enable muscle growth. His self-research on his own body led him to determine what length and width of bands are ideal and the optimal degree and locations to apply KAATSU pressure in various activities.

Moment of Proof

By 1973 on his own body, Sato gradually developed the details and fine-tuned the protocols of KAATSU as it continues to be practiced. At the age of 25 he went on a ski trip when he badly fractured his ankle and torn the ligaments around his knee. The injuries were diagnosed and his own father, a local doctor, told Sato that it would take six months to heal.

With a plaster cast on his leg, Sato rehabilitated himself with his KAATSU bands applied to his upper leg. Because he could not withstand the discomfort of keeping the bands on for the usual duration, he released the bands and repeatedly tightened the bands while doing isometric exercises for 30 seconds on and a few seconds off three times per day.

The results of his regimen – now known as the KAATSU Cycle – surprised him to a certain extent, but really shocked his doctors because not only did his muscles not atrophy, but he fully recovered within six weeks.

Years of Confirmation

Word spread locally of Sato’s unheard of recovery. Demand for his new approach built rapidly around Tokyo, so Sato opened the Sato Sports Plaza in Fuchu where the KAATSU Japan headquarters still exists.

Sato conducted KAATSU on local people of all ages and abilities over the next decade. Injured patients, healthy athletes, older people and younger adults flocked to his office. While applying KAATSU to thousands of clients, Sato learned what worked best for people with various kinds of afflictions and injuries and from all walks of life between 1973 and 1982.

Mind – Body – Spirit Connection

Sato observed that KAATSU enabled the human body to improve and heal itself most effectively and most efficiently than any other therapy or modality.

He also encouraged people to focus mentally on their injured body part while doing KAATSU and observed how the intake of food and water before and after KAATSU also led to positive results. The mind-body-spirit connection was clearly evident.

Patenting KAATSU

In 1994, Sato applied for his first patents in Japan (Patent No. 2670421), U.S.A. (Patent No. 6149618), and Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy with 94206403.0) as he produced and commercialized the first KAATSU Training bands. He worked on injured professional golfers and Japanese Olympians as his reputation grew.

Introduction of the KAATSU Instructor Certification Program

In 1997, Sato introduced the KAATSU Instructor educational program in Japan where his defined protocols were shared with coaches, trainers, physical therapists and physicians throughout Japan. Over 3,000 KAATSU Instructors were certified and hundreds of more experienced KAATSU Special Instructors were licensed. These instructors conducted tens of thousands of KAATSU sessions annually and safely without complications.

Media attention and public acceptance grew in Japan after KAATSU was named one of the collaborative projects of the University of Tokyo Hospital’s 22nd Century Medical and Research Center in 2000.

Sato also began to offer an ischemic circulatory physiology course at the University of Tokyo Hospital and conducted joint development work with the Japan Manned Space Systems Corporation.

KAATSU Research

Beginning in the mid-1990’s, Sato began joint research with Professor Naokata Ishii of the Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, at the University of Tokyo. Other researchers in Japan, including cardiologists Dr. Nakajima and Dr. Morita at the University of Tokyo Hospital, started to explore the benefits of KAATSU and various research results were submitted to peer-review publications.

KAATSU Internationalization

In 2014, KAATSU Global was established in Huntington Beach, California and the Center for KAATSU Research at the Harvard Medical School was started in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Sato and his partners, Steven Munatones, Richard Herstone, David Tawil, retired Navy SEAL Captain John Doolittle, Robert Heiduk in Germany, Péter Lakatos in Hungary and many others began expansion to the markets in the North America, South America, Oceania, Europe and Asia. Eventually, KAATSU Global developed the next-generation products that were also sold to and distributed by Dr. Sato in Japan.

KAATSU Future

Future applications and the third generation of KAATSU products are currently being explored in the military, medical, sports performance and corporate wellness markets in the United States with plans for further expansion in Asia, South America, Europe, and Oceania.

While KAATSU has expanded to 32 countries as of 2018, there are also an increasing number of knock-offs and imitators that use KAATSU copyrighted materials and attempt to design products around KAATSU patents as the global market continues to grow.

Summary Timelines

1966: Dr. Sato developed the concept of KAATSU when he was sitting on his heels during a Buddhist ceremony.
1966-1972: Dr. Sato experiments on himself and develops the basic KAATSU methodology through years of trial and error.
1973: Dr. Sato breaks his ankle during skiing and uses KAATSU Cycle to rehabilitate himself quickly.
1973-1982: Dr. Sato begins to offer KAATSU to others.
1983-1994: Dr. Sato continues to improve know-how to apply KAATSU through increasingly wider application to people and basic research.
November 1993: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in Japan (Patent No. 2670421).
June 1994: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in the United States (Patent No. 6149618).
August 1994: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Italy (94306403.0).
1995: KAATSU receives recognition after being used on the Japanese bodybuilding champion Toshio Konuma.
1996-1999: Dr. Sato begins joint research with Professor Naokata Ishii, Department of Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo.
1997: Various research results are released at academic conferences in Japan.
2000: Research results are published in various academic journals.
2001: Research results are announced by the Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine.
September 2001: KAATSU and KAATSU Aqua are tested at Golden West College in California, first time outside of Japan.
2004: Japan KAATSU Training Society is established.
June 2004: The study of KAATSU is initiated in the University of Tokyo Hospital's 22nd Century Medical and Research Center.
June 2004: Research results are published by the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine.
October 2004: KAATSU Training and ischemic circulatory physiology course is established at the University of Tokyo Hospital.
April 2005: Joint development agreement is signed with the Japan Manned Space Systems Corporation.
August 2005: Advanced medical research & development cluster is launched at the University of Tokyo Hospital.
October 2005: KAATSU Master Mini is developed and launched in Japan.
April 2006: The University of Tokyo offers a course in Sport and Exercise Biometrics at its Graduate School of Frontier Science.
August 2006: Joint research begins with JAXA and the University of Tokyo into KAATSU implementation into space.
December 2006: KAATSU Training Research Institute Co., Ltd. is launched.
July 2007: Research on KAATSU begins at Rutgers University, University of Oklahoma, West Point, University of Texas and Indiana University Purdue University.
May 2008: KAATSU Master is launched.
August 2008: American College of Sports Medicine signs co-research project with Dr. Sato.
April 2009: Dr. Sato is appointed as Knight Commander of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.
September 2009: Joint development agreement is signed with Jilin University and the State General Administration of Sports in China.
April 2010: Genetic research starts at the Research Institute of Sports Science of the State General Administration of Sports in China. December 2013: Dr. Sato starts to work with United States Ski & Snowboard Association in Park City, Utah.
February 2014: KAATSU Global, Inc. is established in California.
February 2014: KAATSU is used by American Olympic Nordic combined skiers at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.
September 2014: New KAATSU Master and KAATSU Nano are launched in the United States.
2016: Drs. Sato, Ishii, Nakajima and Abe publishes the book, KAATSU Training: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives, in English.
2016: KAATSU is widely used by Olympic athletes at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2017: KAATSU is used by personnel in the Department of Defense and Special Operations Command in the United States military.
2018: KAATSU is used by athletes in the NFL (National Football League), NBA (National Basketball Association), MLB (Major League Baseball), NHL (National Hockey League), MLS (Major League Soccer) and NCAA Division I, II and III institutions in the United States.
2018: KAATSU is used by personnel in the Israeli Defense Forces.
2018: KAATSU is used by paraplegics and quadriplegics for the first time outside of Japan.
2019: KAATSU is distributed in 47 countries and 50 American states including at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).
June 2019: Robert Heiduk publishes the book, KAATSU – The Pressure Training From Japan – New perspectives in sport, therapy and health promotion, in English and German.
June 2019: Dr. Nakajima and Dr. Sato publishes the book, University of Tokyo Hospital 22nd Century Medical and Research Center KAATSU Training & Ischemic Circulatory Physiology Course Summary from 2004 - 2014, in English.
July 2019: Next-generation KAATSU Master 2.0 is launched in the United States, Europe, and Middle East.
September 2019: Next-generation KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is launched in the United States, Europe, and Middle East.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, September 21, 2019

KAATSU Cycle 2.0 Is Launched



































































After years of research, design modifications, software changes, user feedback and utilization of metabolite testing results, the next-generation KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is now available. "It is more compact and quieter. It is more capable and more powerful than the first-generation KAATSU Nano and KAATSU Master products," explains Steven Munatones. "It enables exercise, recovery and rehabilitation anywhere anytime by anyone.

The ultra compact, ultralight, durable unit offers the KAATSU Cycle and KAATSU Training modes and utilizes precise, software-controlled limb pressure for both your arms and legs
."

The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 includes 4 KAATSU Air Bands (for both arms and legs), a rechargeable battery with a USB-C charger. The pneumatic elastic bands can be disconnected from the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit and are waterproof, for use in the pool.

Based on the original KAATSU know-how and US patent #9,775,619 (Compression and decompression control system and vascular strengthening method), the equipment:

›› can tone muscle without weights
›› is convenient: do anywhere, anytime by anyone
›› offers access to the KAATSU Performance database
›› offers 6 pre-sent KAATSU Cycle levels
›› can efficiently and effectively improve speed, stamina and strength
›› is an incredible time saver
›› can improves circulation
›› enables faster recovery
›› enables greater range of motion for those rehabilitating and recovering from injuries and surgeries
›› is reimbursable with various CPT codes
›› offers customizable KAATSU pressures

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Monday, September 16, 2019

KAATSU Cycling For Cyclists



Competitive cyclists, including professional keirin cyclists and triathletes use KAATSU equipment in a variety of ways:

1. Warm-up and stretching with KAATSU Cycles
2. Workout recovery with KAATSU Cycles
3. Increased watt output with KAATSU Cycles
4. Increased watt output with KAATSU Training
5. Increase functional threshold power using KAATSU Training
6. Rehabilitation with KAATSU Cycles

Warm-up and stretching with KAATSU Cycles
* As the athletes prepare for a vigorous workout, they do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their arms and then 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their legs.
* They can remain stationary, stretch, or do easy cycling on a stationary bicycle during these warm-up KAATSU Cycles.
* Using the KAATSU Wearables or the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 equipment, the units are easily and comfortable used.
* It is important to be well hydrated before starting KAATSU Cycles.
* It is very important to start with comfortable (i.e., lower) Optimal SKU pressure levels and gradually increase the Optimal SKU levels with each subsequent KAATSU Cycle.

Workout recovery with KAATSU Cycles
* As the athletes complete a vigorous workout, they do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their legs so waste products in their muscles can be effectively and efficiently removed. This enables the athlete to benefit from a rapid recovery so their subsequent workouts are optimized.
* They can remain stationary, stretch, or do easy cycling on a stationary bicycle during these cool-down KAATSU Cycles.
* Using the KAATSU Wearables or the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 equipment, the units are easily and comfortable used.
* It is important that the KAATSU Color is pink or rosy or beefy red while doing KAATSU Cycles; the skin tone should never be white, blue or gray.

Increased watt output with KAATSU Cycles
* Athletes can do their workouts while gradually increasing the Optimal SKU levels of the KAATSU Cycles.
* For example, athletes can do 6-8 sets of KAATSU Cycles as the Optimal SKU levels increase from 200 to 225 to 250 to 275 to 300 to 350 to 400 SKU.
* As time and experience with KAATSU increases, the watt output will also increase.
* Athletes can change (either decrease or increase) the parameters of time, incline, Optimal SKU levels as well as watt output.

Increased watt output with KAATSU Training
* Athletes can workout while setting their Optimal SKU at a specific level in the KAATSU Training mode.
* For example, athletes can cycle for a specific time at a specific SKU level at a specific watt output (e.g., 200 SKU for 15 minutes at a specific watt output).
* As time and experience with KAATSU increases, the watt output and time will also increase (e.g., 250 SKU for 20 minutes at an increased specific watt output).

Increase functional threshold power using KAATSU Training
* Athletes can workout while setting their Optimal SKU at a specific level in the KAATSU Training mode.
* For example, athletes can aim for a specific time at a specific SKU level at a specific watt output (e.g., 200 SKU for 15 minutes at a specific watt output).
* As time and experience with KAATSU increases, the watt output and time will also increase (e.g., 200 SKU for 20 minutes at an increased specific watt output). When the time goal is achieved, then the Optimal SKU level can also be increased.

Rehabilitation with KAATSU Cycles
* Torn muscles, ligaments, tendons or broken bones can be efficiently and effectively rehabilitated using the KAATSU Cycle mode.






























It should be noted that academic researchers confirmed what KAATSU Specialists have long known since the 1980's: that low-intensity exercise with KAATSU Air Bands leads to muscle growth and strength gains.*

Many researchers between 2000 - 2005 tested KAATSU Walking with MRI-measured muscle size and strength (maximum dynamic or one repetition maximum) and isometric strength along with blood hormonal parameters. Testing was done on both control groups and experimental groups of subjects ranging from young men to older women.

The testing was done using 2-minute bouts of treadmill speed of 50 meters per minute.

The researchers found a multitude of benefits and changes among the experimental KAATSU users while there was no change in muscle size and dynamic and isometric strength in the control group..

1. Serum growth hormone was elevated after KAATSU Walking with the experimental group, but not with the non-KAATSU control group.
2. MRI-measured thigh muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume increased by 4 - 7%.
3. One repetition maximum and maximum isometric strength increased between 8 - 10%

Furthermore, indicators of muscle damage (creatine kinase and myoglobin) and resting anabolic hormones did not change with both groups. The researchers concluded that KAATSU Walking induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain despite the minimum level of exercise intensity after 3 weeks, and that KAATSU Walking may be a potentially useful method for promoting muscle hypertrophy for a wide range of the population including the frail and elderly.

While these benefits have long been known in Japan, there have been many other applications that have since been developed and researched that address age-related skeletal muscle loss (sarcopenia) that inhibits mobility and increases the risk of developing several diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis and heart disease.

As the implications of KAATSU protocols began to be appreciated by the United States military, researchers like Dr. William Ursprung at Texas A&M University studied the effects of KAATSU Walking to improve aerobic capacity. Dr. Ursprung evaluated the effects of KAATSU Walking on VO2max, 1.5 mile run times, and muscular size at low training volumes and intensities with airman from the U.S. Air Force 350th Special Operations and Tactics Training Squadron.

After three weeks of lower extremity KAATSU Walking, the test found significant improvements in VO2max, significant decreases in 1.5 mile run time, and significant increases in thigh muscle cross sectional area and the researchers concluded that KAATSU Walking represents a methodology for improving aerobic capacity, endurance and muscular size at low training volumes and intensities.

This conclusion mirrored the applications for KAATSU that many far forward-thinking coaches and trainers have known and used. For military personnel and athletes who are looking for concurrent improvements in strength and endurance, they do not always have to move, run, swim, cycle or row at maximum intensity if they strategically use KAATSU equipment.

While movement or exercises with KAATSU equipment performed with intensity will result in significant physiological and athletic improvement, it is always unnecessary.

"As long as their technique and athletic form is correct, athletes and military personnel can realize benefits with KAATSU by moving more slowly (i.e., walking versus running or swimming at a moderate pace versus swimming at maximum speed) rather than always going all-out," explains Steven Munatones. "Perhaps this lowered intensity is appropriate after injuries or immediately after a competition or during a taper phase of training. Perhaps this slower pace or raw speed is simply more appropriate during different parts of any specific workout when an athlete is working on their technique or form."

This phenomena means that the implications and applications of KAATSU usage expands significantly. When benefits and improvements can be achieved at any speed, pace or level of intensity, coaches and athletes can be much more flexible and creative in their training decisions.

For example, instead of only going all-out sprints with KAATSU, runners, cyclists, swimmers, rowers and skiers can practice at more moderate pace - which means that KAATSU can be done more frequently and with less resultant fatigue.

The same effects of KAATSU have been found with other KAATSU-using mammals like horses, mice, rats, and goats in testing performed in Japan and China.


























The photo above show Chinese scientists attaching standard KAATSU Air Bands on the hind legs of goats in northern China under the auspices of China's State General Administration of Sports, the government agency responsible for sports in China that also administers the Chinese Olympic Committee.

Kenneth McKeever, Ph.D., FACSM serves as the Associate Director of Research and is a Professor of Animal Sciences at The Rutgers Equine Science Center. The Center is part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and is dedicated to better horse care through research and education to advance the well-being and performance of horses and the equine industry.

Since 1995, Professor McKeever has proceeded to build, develop, and coordinate one of the most active Equine Exercise Physiology laboratories in the USA. One of the most interesting studies that Professor McKeever conducted in collaboration with his colleagues Professors Abe, Kearns, Filho and Sato of the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at the Tokyo Metropolitan University and the Department of Ischemic Circulatory Physiology at The University of Tokyo in Japan.

His study on this topic of using standard KAATSU Air Bands - the same used on humans - is entitled Muscle, tendon, and somatotropin responses to the restriction of muscle blood flow induced by KAATSU-walk training that was published in Equine Exercise Physiology.

Professor McKeever and his fellow researchers delved into the efficacy of KAATSU being used as both as a therapeutic method as well as a training aid. The purpose of their study was to investigate the effects of slow KAATSU Walking on muscle and tendon size.

They studied 6 healthy, unfit Standardbred mares performed walking (240 meters/minute for 10 minutes and then a 5-minute recovery) with KAATSU, and 6 mares performed walking without KAATSU. The KAATSU Air Bands - the same model and type that were used by humans and with the goats in China - were inflated using KAATSU equipment and placed at the most proximal position of the forelegs and inflated to a pressure of 200-230 mmHg throughout the KAATSU walking and recovery sessions.

The training was conducted once a day, 6 days/week for 2 weeks. Skeletal muscle thickness and tendon thickness were measured using B-mode ultrasound at baseline and after 2 weeks of training. Venous blood samples were obtained before the first acute exercise and 5, 15 and 60 minutes afterwards. Serum somatotropin concentration was determined using a commercially available equine-specific ELISA kit.

The professors found that the acute increase in plasma somatotropin was 40% greater (P<0.05) in the KAATSU Walking group than in the Control-walking group 5 minutes after exercise and remained elevated (P<0.05) at 15 and 60 minutes post exercise compared with the Control-walking group. After 2 weeks of training, muscle thickness increased (P<0.05) 3.5% in the KAATSU Walking group, but did not change in the Control-walking group (0.7%). Tendon thickness did not change (P>0.05) in either group.

They concluded that these data demonstrate that KAATSU can induce muscle hypertrophy in horses and suggest that KAATSU may provide significant therapeutic/rehabilitative value in horses, as has been shown in humans.

* Muscle size and strength are increased following walk training with restricted venous blood flow from the leg muscle, Kaatsu-walk training by Professor Abe and Professor Kearns of Tokyo Metropolitan University and Professor Sato of the University of Tokyo.

** The Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Training on VO2Max and 1.5 Mile Run Performance by William Ursprung, published in the International Journal of Exercise Science.




















































Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Casual KAATSU - Intensity Can Be Reduced With KAATSU Cycle



Among many young men - especially those in the bodybuilding and strength-training worlds - believe that KAATSU needs to be painful and discomforting in order to realize its benefits and see improved results. While this may be true for BFR (Blood Flow Restriction) training with occlusion bands or blood pressure cuffs, this is not true for KAATSU.

So while the young man in the above video is pushing himself to extremely high intensity levels, this level of exertion - or anything similar - does not need to be the case.

KAATSU benefits - performed at much lower levels of intensity - include improved recovery, increased speed of rehabilitation, effective warm-up and a metabolically efficient way to workout or finish off a training session.

Recovery
For recovery, the KAATSU Cycle mode provides a very convenient, easy-to-use, and very importantly easy-to-feel means to recover effectively and efficiently after a vigorous workout or intense competition.

With the KAATSU Cycle, blood pooling is mechanically enabled with the KAATSU equipment for between 20-30 seconds (i.e., when your hands are very pink, rosy or a beefy red with visible vein distension). Then a repeated and subsequent 5-second total release of the KAATSU Air Band pressure enables a large venous flow of blood that includes the waste products produced during the vigorous workouts or intensive competition. This alternate pooling-and-release repetition is an easy-to-use means to clear the muscles of waste products.

Rehabilitation
For rehabilitation, the KAATSU Cycle mode also provides a very convenient, easy-to-use, and very importantly easy-to-observe means to rehabilitate effectively and efficiently from an injury or surgery.

Benefits such as a lack of muscle atrophy and sustained strength and aerobic conditioning become obvious with two or three KAATSU Cycle sessions per day. The KAATSU Cycle sessions can be done at your home, your office or during travel, making rehabilitation a constant throughout the day instead of merely focusing on rehabilitation during periodic visits to a physical therapy office.

Performance Gains Before Workout or Competition
For performance gains, the KAATSU Cycle mode provides a very convenient, easy-to-use, and very importantly easy-to-feel means to prepare effectively and efficiently for a vigorous workout or intense competition. When the vascular system - especially the capillaries that are ubiquitous in your muscles are engorged with blood, the effectiveness of a warm-up is optimized.

That is, doing 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on your arms followed by 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on your legs while stretching or walking around the track, field, gym or pool is an optimal way to get your vascular system and therefore your muscles prepared for a workout or competition.

Performance Gains During Workout
To experience the inevitable "race pain" experienced by athletes in competition, athletes can incorporate KAATSU in the middle or towards the end of their workouts on the track, field, gym or pool.

Ideally, KAATSU equipment is used to enhance the existing movements or sets performed in a workout, not necessarily as a replacement for proven workout drills and sets that already exist. So, for example, a basketball player can take 10-20 jump shots with the KAATSU Air Bands on. As fatigue sets in, the vertical leap will steadily decrease. When the coach or athlete determines that form has degradated beyond which is useful, the KAATSU Air Bands should be removed. After a brief rest and perhaps a bit of hydration, the athlete should resume his jump shot drill and see how how and fast he or she elevates and how smooth his shooting motion becomes.

The same can be done with track athletes, swimmers or any athletes who are practicing specific movements (e.g., starts, wrestling moves, agility drills, jumps, throws, pitches, or sprints). That is, the athletes should fatigue their muscles and stress their vascular system for brief periods within a workout (5-15 minutes) with the KAATSU Air Bands on. Then they should remove the KAATSU Air Bands and do the same movements in an explosive or intense manner similar what they want to do in competition.

For example, runners and swimmers can practice their starts or do a few sprints with the KAATSU equipment to the point of fatigue, and then finish off their workout without the KAATSU equipment - so they finish a workout with optimal performances.

Performance Gains in Lieu of a Workout
Special operators in the United States Air Force did KAATSU Walking with their KAATSU Leg Bands on for 3 weeks in a clinical test conducted at a U.S. military base under the supervision of researchers and scientists. They did not run as part of their normal training as they typically do. But the increased vascular elasticity due to the KAATSU Walking led to physiological improvements. The improvements were demonstrated by increased VO2 max and faster mile run times across the tested special operators [see photo below].






























The ability to significantly decrease the intensity of KAATSU while still seeing physiological and vascular improvements is a key to sustained use by athletes, people recovering from injuries or surgeries, older individuals, and those who may not be psychologically motivated to exercise intensely - or at all.

Of course, for those athletes who are entirely focused on KAATSU performance gains and am aiming for Olympic medals, world championships, NCAA or professional sport competitions, intense KAATSU sessions are part of their overall equation - but not the only part.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global