Wednesday, July 29, 2020

KAATSU At Home With Laurel Kuzins

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 30th


Laurel Kuzins is a KAATSU Functional Mobility Specialist from Santa Monica, California who leads the daily KAATSU At Home workouts starting at 3 pm California time / 6 pm New York time Mondays through Fridays on Zoom or Instagram Live. These KAATSU workouts are aimed at Competitive Athletes (high school + collegiate + Olympian + professional + fitness + masters). She uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 during the KAATSU At Home workouts.

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 27th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 28th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 31st


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Sunday, July 26, 2020

Great Leg Workout With KAATSU



Football or fútbol, speed skating or rowing, ice hockey or cycling, powerful leg power and drive are common among elite athletes.

One example is using KAATSU Air Bands on the upper legs on a slide board. After a few or several sets of KAATSU Cycles, the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 can be detached from the bands and then used in various sets on the slide board - see above.

Another intense KAATSU program that Japanese Olympic speed skaters developed for speed and power was used by Hiroyasu Shimizu, a 1998 500m speed skating Olympic champion and 5-time world record holder from Japan. While only 162 cm in height (5'-3"), the power and size of his thighs are renowned.

He used the following 5 basic exercises with KAATSU Air Bands:


6 Types of Exercises:
1. Squats
2. Leg Curls
3. Leg Lunges
4. Calf Raises
5. Slide Board

Key Points:
* Focus on doing "non-lock exercises" where the knees are never fully extended and the muscles are constantly engaged with the KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Keep the rest period between sets and between exercises to 20 seconds maximum.
* Build the lactate levels to the highest levels possible.
* Do 3-4 sets of each exercise to failure (maximum effort).
* Failure on each set should be reached earlier and earlier (i.e., 24-40 repetitions on the first set in each exercise; >20 reps on second set; >10 reps in his third set; 1-2 reps on fourth set.

Details:
1. SQUATS
Do deep, quick non-lock squats until failure where the knees are kept at less than 90° throughout the 4 sets.

2. LEG CURLS
Do quickly paced leg curls until failure where the legs were kept at less than 90° throughout the 4 sets.

3. LEG LUNGES
Do deep walking leg lunges where athlete "walks" forward with (or without) a bar bell resting on the shoulders (or dumb bells in his hands).

4. CALF RAISES
Do 4 sets of calf raises with weights on the shoulders and toes in a starting position elevated above the heels (i.e., while standing on a small step or a step board) so the calves are worked.

5. SLIDE BOARD
Skate back and forth on a slide board in a deep squat, occasionally with weights resting on his shoulders.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Clinical Safety Of KAATSU























Steven Munatones of KAATSU Global reported, "After reading the published paper, Clinical safety of blood flow-restricted training? A comprehensive review of altered muscle metaboreflex in cardiovascular disease during ischemic, I recall the decade-long research on KAATSU that a team of experienced cardiologists at the University of Tokyo Hospital conducted on over 7,000 cardiac rehab patients between 2004 and 2014.

If this decade-long study had not been successful, KAATSU would have never been introduced outside of Japan. If the KAATSU protocols had caused any untoward issues with these older cardiac rehab patients, KAATSU Global would have never been established in the United States - or anywhere.

After 10 years of studying, testing and researching the passive use of KAATSU Cycles and documenting the applications and limitations of KAATSU equipment, it is very clear that BFR equipment and BFR protocols noted in the published literature are significantly different
."

In the aforementioned paper, the authors note that "blood flow restriction training (BFRT) requires the inflation of a pneumatic pressure cuff or a tourniquet positioned proximal to the exercising muscle before, and during, the bout of exercise."

KAATSU Difference: KAATSU flexible, narrow pneumatic bands is neither a blood pressure cuff or tourniquet and were never designed or engineered to occlude blood flow. In fact, with the help of a Masimo MightySat Finger Pulse Oximeter, one can easily see how blood flow is never occluded with the KAATSU Air Bands.

"Low-intensity BFRT with resistance training promotes comparable increases in muscle mass and strength observed during high-intensity exercise without blood flow restriction. BFRT has expanded into the clinical research setting as a potential therapeutic approach to treat functionally impaired individuals, such as the elderly, and patients with orthopedic and cardiovascular disease/conditions."

KAATSU Difference: For cardiac rehab patients, only KAATSU Cycles are performed. While BFR refers to sustained constant pressure while trying to build muscle mass, KAATSU Cycles are repeated intermittent inflation and deflation of the bands without a focus on building muscle mass.

"BFRT is a method of exercise training that involves execution of low-intensity resistance exercise combined with blood flow restriction (LIBFR) provided by an inflatable cuff or a tourniquet placed proximal to the exercising muscle."

KAATSU Difference: With the KAATSU Cycle, the limbs do not have to move and exercise is not a requirement or even an expectation for cardiac rehab patients doing KAATSU.

"In general, the external cuff pressure applied is set relative to the arterial occlusion pressure (AOP; i.e., the pressure required to cease blood flow to a limb), which is sufficient to produce partial restriction of arterial inflow and full occlusion of venous outflow."

KAATSU Difference: The pressure of the KAATSU Air Bands are not related to or dependent upon the arterial occlusion pressure. Most definitely, the full occlusion of venous outflow and the partial restriction of arterial information are not neither the goals of KAATSU nor part of its applications and protocols.

"A large survey in Japan with BFRT [note: authors refer to KAATSU Specialists] instructors from 232 facilities did not verify any major event, such as cerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarct, or thrombosis in 120,000 subjects with a large variability of demographical and clinical characteristics (e.g., older adults and people with obesity, diabetes, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases). Reported side effects were generally minor, including transient numbness or dizziness, subcutaneous hemorrhage, and itchiness."

KAATSU Difference: This survey of Japanese KAATSU Specialists is accurate ("Use and safety of KAATSU training: Results of a national survey"); however, none of the Japanese instructors had access to the currently available automated KAATSU Cycle function of the KAATSU Master 2.0, KAATSU Nano and KAATSU Cycle 2.0 units. The survey was conducted in Japan over 15 years ago before the current-generation equipment was developed. In 2014 as a result of the decade-long study, KAATSU Global only sells equipment with the automated KAATSU Cycle function.

In the case of transient numbness or dizziness, the KAATSU Air Bands should be immediately removed and the patients should be well hydrated before and only do the automated KAATSU Cycles. In the case of subcutaneous hemorrhage and itchiness, the KAATSU Air Bands should be removed and reapplied at a lower pressure. For these reasons and others, KAATSU tightness (pressure) is never a function of AOP.

"However, care should be taken with general assumptions about BFRT safety given the paucity of long-term prospective trials with clinical populations, and the possibility of some remaining adverse effects that are still largely overlooked in the literature."

KAATSU Difference: An important result of the 10-year study of 7,000 cardiac rehab patients in Japan was that KAATSU is not used on patients who have experienced acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, ventricular tachycardia or severe arrhythmia, serious case of cardiac insufficiency (NYHA class IV), serious aortic stenosis, acute pulmonary embolism or lung infarction, and acute myocarditis or pericarditis.

Questions? Contact KAATSU Global at info@kaatsu.com.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

KAATSU At The 2020 Digital Running Show



KAATSU Global CEO & Co-founder Steven Munatones presented the KAATSU running applications at the 2020 Digital Running Show, an entirely virtual running convention (previously called the National Running Show).

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU At Home With Laurel Kuzins Using The KAATSU Cycle 2.0

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 24th


Laurel Kuzins is a KAATSU Functional Mobility Specialist from Santa Monica, California who leads the daily KAATSU At Home workouts starting at 3 pm California time / 6 pm New York time Mondays through Fridays on Zoom or Instagram Live. These KAATSU workouts are aimed at Competitive Athletes (high school + collegiate + Olympian + professional + fitness + masters). She uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 during the KAATSU At Home workouts.

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 23rd


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 22nd


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 21st


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 20th


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Jonty Skinner Talks About Skill Acquisition With KAATSU



Jonty Skinner was inducted as a coach in the American Swimming Coaches Association Hall of Fame Class of 2017.

But the South African first made his name in the international sports world as the fastest sprinter in the world [see below].

He would have been one of the gold medal favorites in the 100m freestyle at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games if his home country of South Africa were not banned due to its apartheid. Ineligible to compete in the Olympics, he had to showcase his speed in a shallow pool in Philadelphia.

He broke the world record - and was joyfully congratulated by his rivals, a tribute to his journey and obstacles that he overcame to become the fastest man in the water.

At the 1976 Olympics, his American rival Jim Montgomery won the 100m gold medal en route to becoming the first swimmer in history to break the 50-second barrier in the 100m freestyle with a 49.99. Twenty days later, Skinner set a new standard in 49.44 to set the world record.

Upon his retirement as the world's fastest sprinter, Skinner has long established another great legacy, this time in coaching.

He is a scientifically-minded, analytically-oriented coach whose career included an 8-year reign as USA Swimming’s Director of National Team Technical Support covering the 2000 Sydney, 2004 Athens, and 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. In this position, Skinner was charged with organizing all of the testing, monitoring, and analysis of national team swimmers.

He also coached three separate times in Tuscaloosa at the University of Alabama (1978-1981; 1988-1994, 2012-2019) in one of the swimming world's most prestigious swimming programs.

As Skinner is described by Floswimming, "He continues to apply his analytical mind towards using cutting-edge scientific methods on his swimmers. In a sport where races are won and lost by hundredths of seconds, Skinner is always searching for new and creative ways to get his swimmers to move faster through the water."

Watch his use of KAATSU here, produced by Floswimming. Skinner also shared his more recent thoughts about KAATSU and how athletes can accelerate their skill acquisition in the video above.



Copyright © 2014 - 2017 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU At Home With Laurel Kuzins Using The KAATSU Cycle 2.0

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 17th


Laurel Kuzins is a KAATSU Functional Mobility Specialist from Santa Monica, California who leads the daily KAATSU At Home workouts starting at 3 pm California time / 6 pm New York time Mondays through Fridays on Zoom or Instagram Live. These KAATSU workouts are aimed at Competitive Athletes (high school + collegiate + Olympian + professional + fitness + masters). She uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 during the KAATSU At Home workouts.

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 15th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 14th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 13th


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

KAATSU Cycling To Help Recover From High Lactate Levels







































Robert Griswold is an American Paralympic swimmer (a medalist) who has cerebral palsy. He is an experienced KAATSU user and does KAATSU Cycles before and after his races as part of his pre-race warm-up and post-race cool-down. He also uses KAATSU Aqua in his workouts.

Griswold’s Anaerobic output (pain tolerance) is extremely high; he averages 16.4 mmol/L after his 100-meter backstroke races and 17.9 mmol/L after his 200-meter individual medley. Those are his two signature races that he should win in next year’s Paralympic Games.

Those lactate levels are rarely reached even by other world-class athletes.

Griswold’s highest recorded post-race lactate level is 21.9 mmol/L, measured after his 200-meter individual medley race in Mexico City performed at high altitude. He had to be carried off the pool deck by the medical staff. They told Griswold that if anyone else on the American team reached those levels that they would have to take them to the hospital.

After Griswold’s races, he swims about 1500 meters in the warm down pool (taking over 24 minutes to cool down to a 2.0 mmol/L level which is deemed to be normal.

But by doing KAATSU Cycles (repeated and intermittent pressure on and pressure off of the KAATSU Air Bands, Griswold only swims 400 meters and saves significant time to get his lactate level down to 2.0 mmol/L.

He reports, “This saves me 20 minutes per race warm down and I felt a lot better. This is important because I had the 100m backstroke and the 200m individual medley A finals only 10 minutes apart in Berlin earlier this year. I did KAATSU Cycles between the races and this was the only reason that I was able to get on the starting blocks for the second race. I was at 18.8 mmol/L after the 200m individual medley.”

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU At Home With Laurel Kuzins Using The KAATSU Cycle 2.0

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 7th


Laurel Kuzins is a KAATSU Functional Mobility Specialist from Santa Monica, California who leads the daily KAATSU At Home workouts starting at 3 pm California time / 6 pm New York time Mondays through Fridays on Zoom or Instagram Live. These KAATSU workouts are aimed at Competitive Athletes (high school + collegiate + Olympian + professional + fitness + masters). She uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 during the KAATSU At Home workouts.

KAATSU At Home Workout on July 10th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 9th, part 1


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 9th, part 2


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 8th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 6th


KAATSU At Home Workout on July 1st


KAATSU At Home Workout on June 30th


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global