Thursday, March 31, 2016

Broken Bones + Rehabilitation = Great Opportunity for KAATSU


It is always a pleasure to work with athletically-minded individuals who cannot stand atrophying as they rehabilitate from injuries.

Jack [shown above] is one of those hard-charging athletes. A highly competitive motorcycle racer, Jack has broken dozens of bones throughout his career and has undergone his fair share of surgeries.

Then he discovered KAATSU with Dr Arthur Ting of Fremont, California.

Below is a typical daily rehabilitation/training program for Jack: He comes into the KAATSU Studio well-hydrated and first works on his arms with the KAATSU Nano device and a medium set of KAATSU Air Bands. Then, he works on his legs.

He takes the time to accurately set his correct Base SKU and then identify his Optimal SKU using the standard KAATSU protocols. He understands well the subtle importance of safely and effectively compressing the venous flow in order to stimulate a systemic response from KAATSU.

Upper Body Workout
1. KAATSU Cycle once at 25 Base SKU and 150 Optimal SKU
2. KAATSU Cycle once at 25 Base SKU and 250 Optimal SKU, constantly checking CRT (Capillary Refill Time) to confirm Optimal SKU
3. KAATSU 3-point arm exercises to muscular failure: 3 sets of hand clenches + 3 sets of biceps curls (with 1 lb dumbbells) + 3 sets of triceps extensions

Lower Body Workout
1. KAATSU Cycle once at 25 Base SKU and 150 Optimal SKU
2. KAATSU Cycle once at 25 Base SKU and 300 Optimal SKU, constantly checking CRT (Capillary Refill Time) to confirm Optimal SKU
3. KAATSU 3-point leg exercises to muscular failure: 3 sets of heel raises + 3 sets of quarter, non-lock squats + 3 sets of standing hamstring curls

He also throws in an occasional walk with the KAATSU leg bands and does bouts of stretching while doing the KAATSU Cycle.

Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Spreading KAATSU In Germany With Robert Heiduk







































































































KAATSU Specialist Robert Heiduk explains the mechanism and equipment of KAATSU using the KAATSU Master and KAATSU Air Bands in the German language in his latest introductory video:



Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Slow Hand Clenches With KAATSU Balls

Courtesy of KAATSU Germany

KAATSU Specialists Robert Heiduk and Marek Joschko from KAATSU Germany wisely use soft KAATSU Balls with the KAATSU Cycle modality.

The soft KAATSU Balls helps clients, patients and athletes do hand clenches at the correct speed (i.e., slowly) during the KAATSU 3-point exercises.

KAATSU users should do hand clenches, biceps curls and triceps extension slowly and steadily during the KAATSU 3-point exercises.

Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, March 19, 2016

KAATSU + Resistance Bands = Great Upper Body Workout

Uno Gomes, Founder and CEO of Let's Band in Malta, shows how to use resistance bands with KAATSU for a great upper body workout.

Standard KAATSU protocols calls for the athlete to do 3-4 sets of each exercise. There should be between 15-20 seconds of rest between each set. If the appropriate Base SKU and Optimal SKU is set, the athlete will reach failure at a decreasing number of repetitions on each subsequent set (e.g., 25 reps on the first set, 15 reps on the second set, 5-10 reps on the third set).

Failure to move the limbs - either muscular or technical - is important in order to send a failure signal through the central nervous system to the brain. This will elicit a cascade of positive physiological reactions in the body.




























































































































































































Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU + Resistance Bands = Great Lower Body Workout

Uno Gomes, Founder and CEO of Let's Band in Malta, shows how to use resistance bands with KAATSU for a great lower body workout.

Standard KAATSU protocols calls for the athlete to do 3-4 sets of each exercise. There should be between 15-20 seconds of rest between each set. If the appropriate Base SKU and Optimal SKU is set, the athlete will reach failure at a decreasing number of repetitions on each subsequent set (e.g., 25 reps on the first set, 15 reps on the second set, 5-10 reps on the third set).

Failure to move the limbs - either muscular or technical - is important in order to send a failure signal through the central nervous system to the brain. This will elicit a cascade of positive physiological reactions in the body.

















































































































































































































































































































































Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Supercomputer Copies Whole-Body Blood Flow





























A new supercomputer simulation of blood moving around the entire human body compares extremely well with real-world flow measurements, researchers say.

Read more here on BBC.

Sunday, March 13, 2016

KAATSU Benefits For Powerlifters

Giancarlo Mavrici quickly realized the benefits of KAATSU

The 22-year-old powerlifter from Germany set a new national junior deadlift record in November 2015. The 94 kg powerlifter hoisted 307.5 kg.

Five months later in March 2016, Mavrici increased his deadlift performance to 320 kg while shedding 2 kg of body weight. His improvement was credited to his use of KAATSU training.

But his improvement was not limited to his deadlift. During the same period, he also improved his squat best from 275 kg to 300 kg.

His key?

Mavrici uses a KAATSU Nano to recover from his strenuous competitions.

"After a deloading period with KAATSU Training, he comes back more refreshed and stronger because KAATSU does not create muscle damage," explained Robert Heiduk.

"KAATSU leads to high levels of muscle activation. It’s very good at inducing hypertrophy with potential in many different settings ranging from rehabilitation and regular exercise to sport specific training."

Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, March 5, 2016

KAATSU Enhances mTOR Signaling Pathways

The January 2016 issue of Heart and Vessel Journal, published by Springer, includes an article by Japanese researchers Toshiaki Nakajima, Tomohiro Yasuda, Seiichiro Koide, Tatsuya Yamasoba, Syotaro Obi, Shigeru Toyoda, Yoshiaki Sato, Teruo Inoue, and Yutaka Kano that is entitled Repetitive restriction of muscle blood flow enhances mTOR signaling pathways in a rat model.

The final publication of this article is available here at link.springer.com (ISSN 0910-8327, Heart and Vessels, DOI 10.1007/s00380-016-0801.6).

The researchers are from the Dokkyo Medical University and Heart Center, Seirei Christopher University, University of Electro-Communications, and University of Tokyo in Japan, and KAATSU International University in Sri Lanka.

The Founding Principles Of KAATSU

Courtesy of © Fitness Business

In the January-February 2016 issue of the Japanese-language Fitness Business Magazine, KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato explained his founding principles for KAATSU.

His principles serve the foundation for the KAATSU concept and the underlying goals of KAATSU Global, Inc. and KAATSU International University in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

The article in Japanese reads, "My principles were established to improve the health and elicit smiles of people around the world.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the invention of KAATSU Training, which I was inspired to invent when I was a student sitting on my knees at a Buddhist ceremony in 1966. I went on to build my know-how through trial and error and ongoing research and development.

During this period, KAATSU Training's official, globally-consistent method, known as 'Dr. Sato’s KAATSU Protocol', was established so that physicians and trainers around the world could offer the training to prevent and treat ailments. It is my hope to share KAATSU Medicine around the world to help prevent and treat ailments.

A turning point came in 2008.

The year before, China and Sri Lanka began adopting KAATSU Training. In Sri Lanka, where the then-Chairman of the World Health Organization (WHO) hailed from and where the South Asia regional office of WHO was located, KAATSU spread like wildfire. It started with Sri Lanka’s president, its high-ranking government officials, and other key individuals in the country. This adoption eventually led to an offer from Sri Lanka to establish KAATSU International University there.

The University was established in 2009 [see below]. After that, there was no stopping as KAATSU Training as it spread globally to Russia, to the United States and to other countries.

Yet, there is one country where the spread of KAATSU Training is lagging behind the others: Japan. Can you guess why?

It’s because the Powers That Be do not practice it. Once they do, they will be aware of its value. In the rest of the world, not only fitness-club owners and physicians, but also key government officials have personally experienced KAATSU Training, becoming aware of its benefits and incorporating it in their own personal training regimens.

Last September, we applied to the WHO for KAATSU to become the "Third Medicine" after Western Medicine and Eastern Medicine. It is certain to be approved within three years. What I ultimately want to do with those trained in KAATSU Medicine is to create “KAATSU Doctors Without Borders" and send them off to the world to help those in need.

If we wanted to see Japan’s fitness industry grow, we will need to regain what we Japanese had in the past: our compassion for others. If more people said, “Let’s use what we have to bring smiles to the faces of others in need. Not to do it for the money, but for the joy it brings to us,” I believe the fitness industry in Japan will begin to thrive.

As the Japanese saying goes, “Compassion is not for the benefit of others."

I'm sure that someday the reward will come back to us.

Sri Lanka has 2,400 years of Buddhist history. That is twice as long as that in Japan. People in Sri Lanka are compassionate and courteous. So were the people in Japan, but not so much today. I believe that the Japanese people must get back to their roots of being compassionate, courteous, pious, and thankful of others and our ancestors.

But when we think of Japan in the future, rather than thinking of how the Japanese should be, we should think of how the Global Citizen should be. After all, it’s because we are all one world.

In the movie Independence Day, when the aliens came to attack our earth in the end, the whole world united to fight them. When I saw that scene, the realization that we are all but one world came over me.

The content of health has the power to make the world one. There is no country in the world where people do not wish for good health. My hope for the young in the fitness industry is to have a world vision in creating original contents for health in order to help make the world a better place
."

Professor Sir Yoshiaki Sato, M.D., Ph.D., FNAI was born in 1948 and currently serves as the Chancellor of KAATSU International University in Sri Lanka [see below] and the Chairman of the Center for KAATSU Research at Harvard Medical School.





















Copyright © 2016 by KAATSU Global