Thursday, February 13, 2020

KAATSU Specialist Series: Arms Or Legs First?

For who? Baby Boomers, retirees, competitive athletes, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Strength, stamina, functional movement, mobility, flexibility, recovery






























While doing KAATSU for your upper body and core and lower body is important, many users prefer to use KAATSU Air Bands only on their arms or only on their legs.

"In general, we find that many men - not all, but enough - like to do KAATSU only on their arms and completely skip doing KAATSU on their legs," says KAATSU Master Specialist Steven Munatones.

"Conversely, we find that many women - not all, but enough - like to do KAATSU only on their legs and don't do KAATSU on their arms. Since the benefits of KAATSU are systemic, there are still well-defined physiological benefits of doing KAATSU only on your arms or legs, but there are also clear advantages to doing KAATSU that focus on your arms, core and legs.

But we often receive questions if it is important to do KAATSU in a specific sequence. The standard KAATSU protocols, long ago tested, researched and proven by KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato and at the University of Tokyo Hospital, is to first do KAATSU on your arms, and then your legs
."

The reasons for this specific order (i.e., first arms and then legs) are as follows:

1. Like any form of exercise, it is very important and most beneficial to warm-up and gradually get the body physiologically ready for effective exercise or rehabilitation.

This is best done first with the arms because the number and cumulative length of the veins and capillaries is less in the arms compared to the legs. We want to prepare - or warm-up - the arms first.

2. The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and KAATSU Master 2.0 were designed to enable users to warm-up gradually. In the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, users can start off with the GROUP LOW level, and then subsequently progress to the GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW, PRO MEDIUM and PRO HIGH levels. Later, they can then customize their KAATSU Training mode up to 400 SKU. In the KAATSU Master 2.0, users can start off with Level 1, and then subsequently progress to Levels 2, 3, 4, and 5. Later, they can then customize their KAATSU Cycle or KAATSU Training mode up to 500 SKU.

3. Some people, if they first start with their legs and put their bands on too tightly and use them for too long (i.e., not abiding by standard KAATSU protocol), may get lightheaded because there is so much blood engorged in their legs and less blood in their head. But if they start off the KAATSU Cycle mode gently and gradually on their arms, and then do the KAATSU Cycle mode on their legs, then they give their bodies time to adjust and this potential issue is eliminated.

Of course, there are cases where either users may not be able (due to a disability or arm cast) to first do KAATSU on their arms - or there are cases where users only do KAATSU on their legs (for personal reasons). But if they start the KAATSU Cycle gradually on their legs (i.e., starting at low levels of pressure), then their bodies naturally acclimate to the pressure and their own preferred KAATSU regimen.

"Dr. Sato always works on his core after he does his legs," explained Steven Munatones. "This can be easily done if you do balance exercises as your core work. Your KAATSU Air Bands are already on your legs and you can transition easily from lower body work to core work by balancing on one leg until you lose your balance or too much fatigue sets in. Or you can do traditional core exercises like planks or sit-ups or something easier like walking slowly and with good posture and a book on your head."

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU Specialist Series: The Three P's of KAATSU

For who? KAATSU Specialists, competitive athletes
For what? Strength, recovery



Former NCAA athlete and KAATSU Specialist Chris Dahowski understands the three specific areas of advantages and benefits of KAATSU for competitive athletes. He calls this concept, the Three P's of KAATSU:

* Physical
* Physiological
* Psychological

Physical
This is defined when the athletes are wearing their KAATSU Air Bands - either on their arms or legs - and are in either the KAATSU Constant or KAATSU Cycle mode.

The lactate build-up that inevitably comes with movement while the KAATSU Air Bands are on literally kickstarts the natural biochemical process in the body. When this movement becomes technically flawless with the KAATSU Air Bands on, this is the optimal way to start preparing the athlete for performance gains.

"After the athlete trains with technically flawless technique and builds that perfect movement into their muscle memory, even if they are not going all-out or at highly intense levels, this is the first part of our KAATSU the original BFR protocol," explains Olympic coach Chris Morgan. "Then, we ask the athletes to take off their KAATSU Air Bands and then replicate their technically flawless technique while working intensely and going all-out.

This can be done while improving free throws with a basketball player, swinging a golf club or baseball bat, or trying to improve times for an Olympic runner, swimmer or rower
."

The raw use of the KAATSU Air Bands during technically flawless athletic movements, even without intensity of all-out exercise is the catalyst for improvement in speed, stamina, or strength. KAATSU introduces physiological changes in the body, a natural adaptation, while the mind-body connection is being refined.

Physiological
This is defined when the athletes are wearing their KAATSU Air Bands - either on their arms or legs - and are in either the KAATSU Training mode and going close to or at race pain or at their highest level of intensity and focus.

When the athletes start to feel the discomfort of their lactate levels increasing as they start to train faster and more intensely, profound changes in their neuromuscular system, vascular system and endocrinology system have already begun. Increases in endothelial cells and IGF-1, and significant release of nitric oxide and human growth hormone, occur naturally and enable the athlete to improve physiologically.

This is especially true if the athlete does KAATSU Cycles before and after each workout, and KAATSU Training within each workout.

Psychological
Coaches understand that their athletes' mindset is absolutely critical for self-confidence and positivity. If the athlete's mind is in the right place, then all their training and preparation will lead to improvement and achievement of their goals.

Morgan explains, "Instead of "race pace", I like to tell the athletes that they must become comfortable with "race pain". At every aerobically-based competition - whether it is swimming, running, rowing, or cycling - there comes a point where fatigue and discomfort come into play. The athletes feel that discomfort - or as they describe it as pain - and start to slow down and adjust their pace...downwards.

But with daily use of KAATSU Air Bands, they can become much more familiar with that race pain. With familiarity comes acclimatization and they learn how to deal with it psychologically
."

Dahowski, who coaches dozens of teenage athletes and prepares them for NCAA Division 1 competition, has a unique view of how to optimally use KAATSU Air Bands during coaching of his high school athletes.

We push our swimmers in fast-swimming sets for 12-18 minutes. Then we will build a social kick where the kids can grab their kick boards and talk as much as they want during specific times during a workout,” Dahowski explains. “But if they do not give it their all or slack off, then we subtract a minute from the social kick. So if we have a built-in 5 minutes of social kicking within a workout and they slack off, then we knock off a minute of their social kick time.

Believe me, when their social kicking time is reduced, the kids have a great way to focus
.”

The social kick serves another purpose. It is a great way for Dahowski to gauge whether or not his athletes are reaching their potential.

After a really hard set, they start their social kicking. But on the first 50, the kids are totally quiet, just kicking slowly with their kick boards. When they have really pushed themselves, they need time for their body – and minds – to recover. But by the 75, I start to hear murmurings and then by the 100, they are chattering like normal. This is a great indicator whether or not the intensity was there.

When I start to hear giggling, I know they are ready to go for the next (hard) time
."

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

KAATSU Specialist Series: Much More Than Muscles

For who? Baby Boomers, retirees, competitive athletes
For what? Strength, stamina, speed, size, functional movement, recovery



A quick Google search of KAATSU will result in plenty of young men and bodybuilders focusing a muscle building.

This result - however desirable by those who want big biceps - is like purchasing a car for its radio. The car offers so many more benefits than simply listening to music. Similarly, KAATSU offers so many more benefits than building biceps.

Depending on the protocols and pressures used, KAATSU is useful for:

1. Improving stamina
2. Improving speed
3. Increasing strength
4. Increasing size
5. Improving sleep
6. Improving recovery
7. Improving metabolism

Key Points

Improving Stamina:
* In order to improve stamina, do KAATSU during aerobic exercise (e.g., running, jogging, walking, swimming, rowing, high intensity training, cycling, boxing) after an initial warm-up with KAATSU Cycles.
* Be very well hydrated before and while wearing KAATSU Air Bands.
* Select a specific distance/duration (e.g., 100 meters in a pool or 1 km on land or a 3-minute round), a relatively low SKU pressure for you (e.g., 150 SKU), and a pace/interval time (e.g., 5 sets of 100m swim every 2 minutes or 3 repeats of 1 km jogging every 4 minutes).
* Do this set within your normal workout routine.
* At the beginning, it is best to be very conservative and select parameters that you can achieve without maximum effort.
* Repeat this set at least 3 times per week until the pace/intensity becomes relatively easy with your given distance, pace/interval, and pressure.
* When the set can be performed moderately well, then slightly increase your SKU pressure and repeat the set at least 3 times per week (over the course of weeks) until the increased pace/intensity also becomes relatively easy.
* Continue increasing your pace/intensity and SKU pressure over a series of weeks or months.
* Always recover by doing KAATSU Cycles after your workout.
Note 1: you can think of this as high-altitude training. Every time that you increase the SKU pressure, it is similar to training at the same pace/interval over the same distance/duration at higher and higher altitudes.
Note 2: you can use this basic concept whether you are an Olympic runner or an older person simply trying to improve your stamina to climb a mountain or complete a local race.

Improving Speed:
* In order to improve speed, do KAATSU Training during sprint sets after an initial warm-up with KAATSU Cycles.
* Be very well hydrated before and while wearing KAATSU Air Bands.
* Select a specific distance (e.g., 20 - 200 meters), a relatively high SKU pressure for you (e.g., 250 SKU), and an intensity level.
* Do this KAATSU Training set within your normal workout routine.
* At the beginning, it is best to be conservative and select parameters that you can achieve with moderate effort.
* Repeat this set at least 3 times per week until your desired speed becomes achievable given your distance, pressure, and intensity.
* When you are satisfied with your speed levels, then slightly increase your SKU pressure and repeat the set at least 3 times per week (over the course of weeks or months) until your speed has reached the next plateau.
* Continue increasing your intensity and SKU pressure over a series of months.
* Always recover by doing KAATSU Cycles after your KAATSU Training workout.
Note 1: you can think of this as a means of maintaining your speed in a race. Every time that you increase the SKU pressure, it is similar to moving at the same speed later and later in the race.
Note 2: you can use this concept whether you are an Olympic runner or an older person trying to improve your speed in the game of tennis or basketball or swimming.

Increasing Strength:
* In order to increase strength, select a specific move or weight and a relatively high SKU pressure for you (e.g., 250 SKU) after doing an initial warm-up with 3-4 KAATSU Cycles.
* Be very well hydrated before and while wearing KAATSU Air Bands.
* Do 3-4 sets of the specific movement that you wish to improve upon - or do 3-4 sets with a very light weight (1-10 kg) that you wish to improve upon - with KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Do many repetitions on the first set (e.g., 30-80). This first set is called Priming The Pump.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only). Note that your muscles will be fatigued and you will not be fully recovered.
* Do as many repetitions as you can on the second set (e.g., 15-30). This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the first set.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only). Note that your muscles will be fatigued and you will not be fully recovered.
* Do as many repetitions as you can on the third set (e.g., 5-15). This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the second set.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only). Note that your muscles will be fatigued and you will not be fully recovered.
* Do as many repetitions as you can on the fourth set (e.g., 1-5). This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the third set.
* The second, third and fourth sets will be difficult and your muscles will be fatigued.
* But these sets are critical for building strength.
* Do this set within your normal workout routine.
* Repeat this set at least 3-4 times per week.
* When you are satisfied with your strength levels, then slightly increase your SKU pressure and repeat the same protocols at least 3 times per week (over the course of months) until your strength has reached the next plateau.
* Always recover by doing KAATSU Cycles after your workout.
Note: move relatively quickly while doing KAATSU.

Increasing Size:
* In order to increase size, select a series of specific exercises centered around that body part (e.g., biceps or glutes) after doing an initial warm-up with 3-4 KAATSU Cycles.
* Be very well hydrated before and while wearing KAATSU Air Bands.
* Do 3-4 sets of each specific exercise for that body part.
* Slowly do many repetitions on the first set (e.g., 30-80). Contract your muscles in both the positive and negative directions. This first set is called Priming The Pump.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only). Note that your muscles will be fatigued and you will not be fully recovered.
* Slowly do as many repetitions as you can on the second set (e.g., 15-30). Contract your muscles in both the positive and negative directions. This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the first set.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only).
* Slowly do as many repetitions as you can on the third set (e.g., 5-15). Contract your muscles in both the positive and negative directions. This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the second set.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only).
* Slowly do as many repetitions as you can on the fourth set (e.g., 1-5). Contract your muscles in both the positive and negative directions. This total number of repetitions should be fewer than the third set.
* Rest 20-30 seconds (only) and move onto your next exercise.
* The second, third and fourth sets will be difficult and your muscles will be fatigued and may start to quiver.
* Do this set within your normal workout routine.
* Repeat this set at least 3-4 times per week.
* When you are satisfied with your increased size, then slightly increase your SKU pressure and repeat the same protocols at least 3 times per week (over the course of months) until your size has reached the next plateau.
* Always recover by doing KAATSU Cycles after your workout.

Improving Sleep:
* In order to improve sleep, select a relatively mild SKU pressure for you while doing 3-4 KAATSU Cycles.
* You can keep the same pressure on 3-5 KAATSU Cycles, or you can slightly increase the SKU pressure on each subsequent KAATSU Cycle.
* As you are doing the KAATSU Cycles, you can do shoulder rolls (forwards and backwards), head rotations, or simply stretching - nothing vigorous with KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Do this protocol ideally within 1 hour of your planned bedtime.
Note: this is especially helpful when you cross time zones or must get up very early.

Improving Recovery:
* In order to improve recovery, do a series of 3-6 KAATSU Cycles at a comfortable SKU levels.
* Be very well hydrated before and while wearing KAATSU Air Bands.
* Stretch and walk slowly (even with the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms) or simply sit comfortably while doing these series of KAATSU Cycles.
* Repeat this recovery set after each vigorous training session or athletic performance.

Improving Metabolism:
* While doing KAATSU Cycle or KAATSU Training while standing or sitting upright, your blood is shifted to the lower part of your body by gravity while the blood flow is naturally increased.
* Increased blood flow improves blood circulation and the volume of oxygen that is carried to the cells is increased to improve the metabolism.
* Diabetes is a disease in which insulin is not produced sufficiently; subsequently, levels of glucose in the blood are above normal.
* While doing KAATSU Cycle, insulin-like growth factor I - which lowers blood glucose levels, is secreted.
* KAATSU serves as the catalyst to secrete IGF-I and immediately lowers blood glucose level; the effect remains until the next day.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Monday, February 3, 2020

KAATSU Specialist Series: Introduction To The KAATSU Cycle

For who? Baby Boomers, retirees, competitive athletes, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Strength, stamina, functional movement, mobility, flexibility, recovery






























When many people first hear about and become interested in KAATSU, they Google "KAATSU". The resultant Google search often lists many BFR (Blood Flow Restriction) products.

It is reasonable for most of these individuals to equate KAATSU with BFR and vice versa - because KAATSU is the original BFR.

"One way to get around this confusion is to input the Japanese symbols for KAATSU which is 加圧 - or for KAATSU Training which is 加圧トレーニング," advises Steven Munatones. "But inputting Japanese kanji characters on an English keyboard or on their smartphone is difficult or impossible for most people. So the best way to find out correct and non-misleading information about KAATSU is to go directly to the KAATSU website (www.kaatsu-global.com) or blog (www.kaatsublog.com) or any of its social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

While the information is entirely in Japanese, others can review the original KAATSU website: www.kaatsu.com. Interested consumers can also copy-and-paste 加圧 - or 加圧トレーニング (Japanese for KAATSU Training) into YouTube and there will be plenty of videos and explanations about KAATSU
."

Some of the questions that BFR users send into the KAATSU website include the following:

Q1. Owens Recovery Science sells PTS Personalized Tourniquet System for Blood Flow Restriction and talks about limb occlusion pressure. Why doesn't KAATSU go to full occlusion or restrict blood flow to the degree recommended by BFR advocates?

A1. The reason why KAATSU does not use full occlusion as a standard to perform BFR is because we do not believe it is necessary or optimally effective for most individuals. KAATSU equipment was designed based on 10 years of working with hundreds of cardiac rehabilitation patients per year (i.e., those who dealt with strokes, heart attacks, heart bypass surgery) at the University of Tokyo Hospital under the guidance of experienced cardiologists. This is where the KAATSU equipment design and protocols were tested and researched - under the guidance of cardiologists and Dr. Yoshiaki Sato using MRI, ultrasound, and blood analyses with mass spectrometers. After a decade of testing and research comparing everything from partial to full occlusion and various degrees of modifying venous flow, we believe KAATSU equipment and protocols are optimally designed; we based this on thousands of sessions with thousands of subjects (patients) in controlled setting where many parameters were accurately measured, compared and tested. The modification of venous flow does not needs to be extreme [see image above] in order to serve as the catalyst for significant hormonal secretion and metabolite production that is optimal for recovery, rehabilitation and athletic performance.

Q2. Other BFR products are FDA approved. Is KAATSU FDA approved?

A2. While some companies make claims or infers its own products are FDA approved, this is not true. KAATSU equipment has also not submitted documentation for FDA clearance, but neither have other BFR companies as of 2019. FDA registration of equipment is not the equivalent of FDA approval. FDA registration is a relatively easy process that does have the same medical, scientific or legal meaning as FDA clearance (or FDA approval in common vernacular).

Q3. Other BFR products have Doppler devices. Why doesn't KAATSU have a Doppler device?

A3. The Doppler devices that KAATSU used were used during its research phase, but since arterial flow is not occluded and venous flow is only slightly modified, there is absolutely no need for use of a Doppler device with KAATSU equipment. The only time that the Doppler was used was with KAATSU was during the research and testing phase of KAATSU where experienced technicians and cardiologists were studying the effects of KAATSU. In contrast, it is logical that a Doppler device is necessary when there is full occlusion or anything near this degree of pressure with BFR devices. The use of Doppler is necessary in these cases with BFR - when the user is doing easy stretching or vigorous aerobic movements, is an active teenager or a sedentary Baby Boomer, or takes myriad medications.

Q4. What is the difference between arterial flow and venous flow?

A4. Arterial flow is the blood flow from the torso into the limbs (arm and legs) via arteries. Venous flow is the blood flow back to the torso from the limbs (arm and legs) via veins.

The heart is the driver of the circulatory system, pumping blood through rhythmic contraction and relaxation. The rate of blood flow out of the heart (often expressed in L/min) is known as the cardiac output.

Blood being pumped out of the heart first enters the aorta, the largest artery of the body.

It then proceeds to divide into smaller and smaller arteries, then into arterioles, and eventually capillaries, where oxygen transfer occurs. The capillaries connect to venules, and the blood then travels back through the network of veins to the right heart. The microcirculation (via the arterioles, capillaries, and venules) constitutes most of the area of the vascular system and is the site of the transfer of O2, glucose, and enzyme substrates into the cells. The venous system returns the de-oxygenated blood to the right heart where it is pumped into the lungs to become oxygenated and CO2 and other gaseous wastes exchanged and expelled during breathing. Blood then returns to the left side of the heart where it begins the process again.


Q5. Wider cuffs are always used with BFR products, but KAATSU uses flexible, elastic, pneumatic thin air bladders that is said to cause nerve damage. Is that true?

A5. That is an absolutely false claim. If the Department of Defense, the Department of Veteran Affairs, many universities and hospitals, and professional and Olympic athletes regularly use KAATSU, there is no possibility of approving KAATSU equipment or using KAATSU protocols if there were any risk of nerve damage - or other misleading claims made by BFR advocates. KAATSU equipment is being used many people over the age of 50 - up to 104 years old. The KAATSU equipment's primary feature is the Cycle mode which automatically shuts off after 4 minutes and allows for deflation every 30 seconds. These protocols are based on the decades of research and testing under the supervision of physicians of various disciplines and researchers with PhD who are under the obligation to report any untoward issue during their KAATSU research.

It should be noted that wide tourniquets and wide blood pressure cuffs are not properly used with the KAATSU equipment. KAATSU equipment is strictly limited to use with the patented, proprietary elastic, flexible pneumatic air bands. Using wide tourniquets with KAATSU equipment would be an intentional misuse of the KAATSU equipment. The pneumatic KAATSU bands serve to stimulate the optimal hormonal and metabolite response in the human body.


Q6. When should the KAATSU Cycle be used? When should the KAATSU Constnat mode be used?

A6. As with tactical athletes (i.e., soldiers and special operators in the US military), collegiate athletes and professional athletes, we recommend that KAATSU Cycles are repeatedly used both before and after every workout and competition as well as during every workout (as possible). If there is a problem with insomnia or travel that requires crossing time zones, then the KAATSU Cycle is also best used within an hour of bedtime.

The KAATSU Cycle can be used every day whether you are at your home, traveling on business, or heading to a competition. Athletes, corporate executives, special operators in the military, and aging Baby Boomers can use KAATSU effectively no matter where they are: in the office, at home or during travel.


Q7. Does KAATSU equipment change pressure with increased hypertrophy?

A7. KAATSU equipment changes pressure upon movement by the limb in real time, it changes with hypertrophy, and it changes slightly and gradually every 30 seconds depending on what parameter you set.

Q8. As KAATSU increases the elasticity of the vascular system, muscle tissue tends to build more easily and rapidly regardless of the individual. So how do you perform KAATSU without building excess muscle mass?

A8. Because KAATSU inventor Dr. Sato was a bodybuilder in his youth, building muscle was important to him. Many (or most?) current online references to KAATSU and BFR refer to muscle building, but this one outcome is just one of myriad possible outcomes. Because many young(er) men post information about BFR with the goal of building the muscles of their upper body (note: it is only occasionally about building lower body strength or girth), the Internet is overflowing with BFR experts talking about muscle building with BFR.

But muscle building is only one of the many goals of KAATSU. What can be seen online vis-a-vis KAATSU is very incomplete and only tells a small sliver of KAATSU outcomes. In 1973, Dr. Sato got injured and broke his ankle and he realized the additional - and in many ways - the most important aspects of KAATSU: rehabilitation and recovery.

Rapid rehabilitation from injuries to bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons, and recovery from surgeries and accidents are critical outcomes for many. The use of the KAATSU Cycle is essential to achieving these outcomes.

Also, KAATSU is ultimately more beneficial because one of its primary benefits is increasing vascular elasticity. For any aerobic athlete (e.g., skiers, runners, swimmers, rowers, triathletes), or weight-based athletes (e.g., wrestlers, boxers, MMA fighters, powerlifters, martial artists), this increased vascular elasticity helps in 3 primary ways:

1. Improvement in stamina because the delivery of arterial blood to the working muscles is improved and made more effective) and the return of venous flow from the working muscles enables a faster dissolution of lactic acid.
2. Improvement in power output (however that is measured in a variety of sports) because the working muscles are more efficient with increased vascular elasticity, especially at the capillary level.
3. Recovery from vigorous workouts enable increased performance in training over the long run.

For injured individuals, the hormonal and metabolite production and improved vascular elasticity are the goals of KAATSU - not muscle-building.

But even with a healthy, young athlete or an older woman recovering from surgery, there is no need for them to build muscle mass with KAATSU if they do not want. KAATSU users can stretch and do specific athletic or therapeutic movements with KAATSU in order to get better - without increasing mass.

They do not need to lift weights or do strength-building exercises with KAATSU - this WILL increase their muscle mass and tone. The KAATSU Cycle enables athletes or those recovering to become more powerful in their movements without the addition of adding muscle mass.


Q9. How do you properly size the KAATSU Air Bands?

A9. Below shows proper sizing of the KAATSU Air Bands for the arms and legs:

Arms:
Small: circumference of upper arm is less than 11.5 inches (29 cm)
Medium: circumference of upper arm is between 11.5 -14 inches (29-35 cm)
Large: circumference of upper arm is between 14 - 16.5 inches (35-42 cm)
Extra Large: circumference of upper arm is between 16.5 - 21 inches (42-54 cm)

Legs:
Small: circumference of upper leg less than 16 inches (40 cm)
Medium: circumference of upper leg is between 16 - 21 inches (40-53 cm)
Large: circumference of upper leg is between 21-26 inches (53-66 cm)
Extra Large: circumference of upper leg is between 26-32 inches (66-81 cm)

To measure your arms, measure the girth above your biceps just below the deltoids. To measure your legs, sit on the edge of a chair and measure the girth as high in the groin as possible.


Q10. What is the best way to use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0?

A10. You can use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit for both the KAATSU Cycle mode and the KAATSU Constant mode. The KAATSU Cycle mode is an 8-stage series of 30 seconds of inflation of the KAATSU Air Bands followed by 5 seconds of deflation of the KAATSU Air Bands. At each stage, the inflated pressure is slightly higher (by 10 SKU). The duration of this 8-stage series of pressure-on and pressure-off is 4 minutes of total pressure.

The physiologic mechanism of the pressure-on and pressure-off is essential to KAATSU.

You can repeat the KAATSU Cycle of 8 stages as you wish up to 6 times.

There are 6 pre-set pressure levels on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 [shown below]. The lowest pressures are selected by pressing the G (GROUP) button on the front face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit. The highest pressures are selected by pressing the P (PRO) button on the top side of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit.

Within the G and P levels, there are also L (LOW), M (MEDIUM) and H (HIGH) pressure settings.

So the lowest possible pressure is GROUP LOW (represented by GL). It is followed by GROUP MEDIUM (represented by GM), GROUP HIGH (represented by GH), PRO LOW (represented by PL), PRO MEDIUM (represented by PM), and PRO HIGH (represented by PH).




































As the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit is working, there are a series of letters and numbers shown on the LED display screen:
* GL1 means GROUP LOW setting on the 1st stage
* GM2 means GROUP MEDIUM setting on the 2nd stage
* GH3 means GROUP HIGH setting on the 3rd stage
* PL4 means PRO LOW setting on the 4th stage
* PM5 means PRO MEDIUM setting on the 5th stage
* PH6 means PRO HIGH setting on the 6th stage
* after the 8th stage has been completed, the unit automatically shuts off

You can repeat the same setting - or increase or decrease the pressure settings as you see fit.

The most highly recommended protocol is to start on GROUP LOW and then proceed gradually upwards on the pressure setting levels. Some users go all the way up to PRO HIGH level, but this level is not for everyone.

Any workout or movements (outside a pool) can be done in the KAATSU Cycle mode.


Q11. What if I would like to do the KAATSU Constant mode?

A11. If you would like to do the KAATSU Constant mode, then untether (i.e., disconnect) the translucent connector tubes after you have inflated the KAATSU Air Bands. You should limit your use of the KAATSU Constant mode to no more than 10 minutes.

Q12. How do I switch from the KAATSU Cycle mode to the KAATSU Constant mode - and vice versa?

A12. Put the unit in the neutral position (where neither the GROUP or PRO buttons are lit). Only the center button (ON/OFF button) should be lit. From this neutral position, press the LOW button on the top side of the unit for 3 seconds. The LED display should automatically change from CYCLE to TRAINING.

The TRAINING mode is pre-set to 200 SKU. You can change this pre-setting upwards or downwards as you see fit. If you press the GROUP button once, you will decrease the pre-set of 200 SKU by 10 SKU (to 190). If you press the GROUP button two times, you will decrease the pre-set of 200 SKU by 20 SKU (to 180). Each press decreases the SKU by 10.

Conversely, if you press the PRO button once, you will increase the pre-set of 200 SKU by 10 SKU (to 200). If you press the PRO button two times, you will increase the pre-set of 200 SKU by 20 SKU (to 220). Each press increases the SKU by 10.

The maximum SKU level is 400 SKU.

When you would like to switch back from the KAATSU Training mode to the KAATSU Cycle mode, press the LOW button again when the front face buttons are in the neutral position.


Q13. Can I do KAATSU more than twice per week?

A13. Yes, you can do the KAATSU Cycle mode up to twice daily. The more KAATSU Cycles you do, generally the faster you will rehabilitate and the greater your vascular elasticity will become.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Use Masimo MightySat™ Finger Pulse Oximeter With The KAATSU Cycle 2.0

For who? Swimmers, competitive athletes, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Strength, stamina, speed, Masimo MightySat™ FingerPulse Oximeter



The Masimo MightySat™ Fingertip Pulse Oximeter can be used with the KAATSU Master 2.0 and KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for a wide variety of purposes.

"One of the best physiological monitoring devices that I have ever used is the Bluetooth-enabled Masimo MightySat™ Fingertip Pulse Oximeter," said Steven Munatones.

"I can simultaneously track and archive the oxygen level in my blood, my pulse, the number of breaths per minute, a measure to understand how well hydrated that I am, and other data points that indicate changes in blood circulation and heart rate recovery.

The Masimo is used with athletes of all abilities to help them understand their bodies better and help them improve and with individuals of all ages who may be recovering from injuries or simply want to improve their level of wellness
."

So how can you combine the use of the Masimo MightySat™ Fingertip Pulse Oximeter with the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and other KAATSU equipment including the KAATSU Master 2.0?

Six specific parameters that can be tracked noninvasively while simultaneously using either the KAATSU Master 2.0 and KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to obtain a wide variety of physiological real-time data:

"It is best to put the Masimo MightySat™ on your non-dominant ring finger," explains Munatones. "So if you are right-handed, put the MightySat™ on your ring finger (i.e., the fourth finger of your hand, located between your little finger and your middle finger).

Also, it is best to sit down comfortably while you are measuring these parameters while using the Masimo MightySat™
.

1. SpO2 or Oxygen Saturation is the oxygen level in your blood that indicates changes due to your heart or lung function, oxygen use by your body, or altitude. It is a percentage of hemoglobin in the blood that is saturated with oxygen. The unit of measure is percentage (%).

"In layman's terms, you want to see this SpO2 percentage increase over time," explains Munatones. "The higher the percentage of Oxygen Saturation, the better. That is, ideally you want 100% SpO2, but the important goal is to see increases in your percentage, both over time and before and after using KAATSU. So, for example, if your SpO2 is at 96% or 97% before you start KAATSU, it is ideal to see your SpO2 to slightly increase to 97% or 98% after a KAATSU session. This indicates a healthful improvement."

2. PR or Pulse Rate is the number of your heart pulses per minute that indicates your overall fitness or exertion levels at any time. The unit of measure is beats per minute (bpm).

"In layman's terms, you want to see this pulse rate - or the number of heart pulses per minute decrease over time, during any specific exercise or while you are simply sitting at rest," explains Munatones. "In general, the lower your pulse during exercise or rest, the better. So, for example, if your heart rate is 85 as you are doing a set of squats, it would be great to see this pulse rate fall to 75-80 beats per minute over time, an indication that your heart and cardiovascular fitness level are improving."

3. RRp™ or Respiration Rate is the number of breaths per minute that indicates how well your heart and lungs function or how quickly you recover from exercise. It is a measurement of respiration rate based on changes in the plethysmographic waveform. The unit of measure is respirations per minute (RPM).

"In layman's terms, you want to see your Respiration Rate to decrease over time, during any specific exercise or while you are simply sitting at rest," explains Munatones. "In general, the lower your Respiration Rate during exercise or rest, the better. So, for example, if your Respiration Rate is 18 as just sit at rest, it would be great to see this rate fall to 12-15 breaths per minute over time, an indication that your breathing efficiency is improving."

4. PVi® or Plethysmograph Variability Index is the variation in perfusion index over your breathing cycle, which may indicate changes in hydration, breathing effort, perfusion, or other factors. The Plethsymographic Waveform displays your real-time pulse pressure waveform.

"In layman's terms, your PVi® is a bit more difficult to track and understand its actual implications of health, but it is one indication of the level of hydration in your thoracic cavity (or chest cavity). To properly measure your PVi®, you should lay down relaxed in a horizontal position and take it at the same time of the day in the same position," explains Munatones.

5. PI or Perfusion Index is the strength of your blood flow to your finger that indicates changes in blood circulation. It is the ratio of the pulsatile blood flow to the non-pulsatile blood in peripheral tissue used to measure peripheral perfusion. The Perfusion Index values ranges from 0.02% for a very weak pulse to 20% for an extremely strong pulse.

"In layman's terms, you want to see your Perfusion Index decrease as you do KAATSU, doing any type of exercise or while you are simply sitting at rest," explains Munatones. "In general, a decrease up to 50% of your first reading is an excellent indication that you are reaching your Optimal SKU (Standard KAATSU Unit). As the Perfusion Index falls from, let's say 5% to 2%, this means you are nearing the peak tightening pressure of your KAATSU Air Bands. So, for example, as you increase the pressure from Group Low to Group Medium to Group High and Pro Low levels, the Perfusion Index should gradually fall. There will always be a lot of fluctuation in this Index, but the most important data to understand is its downward trend to up to 50% of the level in which you started."

6. The Heart Rate Recovery Calculator can track the heart’s ability to return to normal levels after vigorous physical activity. Fitness level and proper heart function are measured by the recovery phase. A heart that is fit will recover at a quicker rate than a heart that is not accustomed to regular exercise. The first minute of recovery is the most crucial. After exercise, your heart rate experiences an abrupt drop during the first minute. This recovery period can indicate cardiovascular fitness level.

"In layman's terms, a lower recovery heart rate should follow vigorous exercise, doing any type of exercise, either comfortable exercise or vigorous exercise ," explains Munatones. "The Masimo's Heart Rate Recovery Calculator is used by putting on the MightySat™ on one of your fingers right after a bout of exercise and then using your Masimo mobile app on your smartphone. After 60 seconds, you will receive your percentage score.

In general, a higher percentage score is better, meaning that your heart is able to recover better, faster after a bout of exercise or KAATSU. So, for example, as you finish your exercise and you receive a higher percentage 60 seconds later, this means your heart is getting stronger and is able to recover faster. This is an excellent indication of improved health
."

For more information about the Masimo MightySat™ Fingertip Pulse Oximeter, visit here or listen to world champion Michael Andrew above.



To support Andrew's continued focus for the 2024 Paris Olympic Games and beyond, use SWIMMERMICHAEL code to purchase KAATSU equipment at www.kaatsuglobal.com.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Robert Griswold, Jamal Hill Head Into The Olympic Year

For who? Paralympians, competitive athletes, swimmers
For what? Strength, stamina, speed, recovery, KAATSU Aqua

53 athletes were named to the 2020 U.S. Paralympics Swimming National Team, as announced today by the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee. The team features 33 women and 20 men, including 19 Paralympians and 9 reigning world champions.

With this being a Paralympic Games year, this is an incredibly important time for our team,” said Queenie Nichols, director of U.S. Paralympics Swimming. “The team just concluded a national team camp which only heightened their excitement for Tokyo 2020. This will be an exciting year, and we can’t wait to get the season started.”

The national team includes two KAATSU users, Robert Griswold (S8/SB7/SM8) from Freehold, New Jersey and Jamal Hill (S9/SB8/SM9) of Inglewood, California.

Griswold performed very well at the 2019 world championships, helping the American team that heads to Melbourne, Australia in February for the World Para Swimming World Series. Indianapolis - relatively close to Griswold's training base at Indiana State University - will be a stop on the World Para Swimming World Series on April 16th-18th.

The U.S. Paralympic Team Trials will be held June 25th-28th in Minneapolis, where the athletes who will represent Team USA in Tokyo will be selected. The Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 will be held August 25th - September 6th.

Every morning before his first workout of the day, Griswold understands the value of doing repeated KAATSU Cycles to warm-up his limbs - and repeating the KAATSU Cycles after the workouts as a recovery modality. Hill similarly frequently uses his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to help him with warm-ups and recovery.



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

John Doolittle Talks About Human Potential

For who? Tactical athletes, competitive athletes
For what? Motivation, inspiration



John Doolittle was a competitive swimmer at the Air Force Academy and later crossed the English Channel in a memorial swim for one of his fellow fallen Navy SEALs.

"John profoundly understands the concepts of honor and sacrifice and reaching one's true potential," said Steven Munatones about the retired Navy SEAL captain with 25 years of military service. "He not only crossed the English Channel, but he had to face the hardships of the famous BUD/s training of the Navy SEALs in the Class of 213. He gives great motivational talks to kids and people of all ages and from all walks of life."

He recently gave a brief talk to young aquatic athletes at Los Alamitos High School [see above] about reaching their potential.

Some background about the Navy SEALs:



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Friday, January 24, 2020

KAATSU The Original BFR Soccer Applications

For who? Soccer players, competitive athletes, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Rehabilitation, recovery, ACL injury































"My knee popped," recalled Josh Saunders, then a goalkeeper with the U.S. Major League Soccer team Real Salt Lake.

"When I came down, I knew the injury was bad, but I had no idea what was to come."

Saunders' fears were confirmed - a torn left ACL, a bad common soccer injury. However, Saunders' injury became more than the typical case - it became life-threatening.

Two weeks after his surgery, Saunders not only contracted a serious bone infection caused by the bacterium streptococcus, but also a candida fungus. "It was no longer about my return to football," Saunders said. "It was about surviving."

Now the New York City Football Club goalkeeper says he is lucky to be alive and to still have his leg. Saunders credits his complete victory to U.S. Olympic ski team doctor and sport scientist Dr. James Stray-Gundersen and his cutting-edge recovery, fitness, and strength protocols - the AlterG treadmill and the KAATSU.

Saunders was looking for anything to get him back in the goal. He had lost significant weight, and more importantly, muscle mass. Saunders met Dr. Stray-Gundersen who elevated his fitness and built his strength with KAATSU protocols, very quickly.

"I had never heard of KAATSU or Blood Flow Moderation Training before.

But Dr. Stray-Gundersen showed me results from his top skier, and I was all for it. He applied 30 minute KAATSU sessions, 5 days per week and in a matter of a few sessions, I had significant increases in strength, and my quad size increased
," said Saunders. "I got that same fatigue feeling in my muscles, with no heavy weights. It was amazing."

"I heard about KAATSU from Harvard researchers who had visited Japan," recalls Dr. Stray-Gundersen. "But we never looked into KAATSU until one of our medalists went down with a severe injury a month before the 2014 Winter Olympics. We rehabilitated [Todd Lodwick] him using KAATSU exclusively, and he raced in 28 days, and we became believers."

Major League Soccer defender Kuami Watson-Siriboe, another ACL tear victim, started the same KAATSU program. The effects were shockingly immediate. "I quickly recovered doing KAATSU 3-Point Exercises and the KAATSU Cycle," says Watson-Sirboe.

"In all applications, we always assess capillary refill and responses throughout recovery - same as Dr. Sato has done since the 1970's," said Dr. Stray-Gundersen. "The KAATSU equipment allows me to identify the optimal pressure each time which is critical for safety and effectiveness as we will fill normally unused capillaries and engage more muscle fibers - we want to achieve the 'fatigue' in the muscle so that the physiologic cascade to produce Growth Hormone, occur.

Simply put, you cannot get beneficial results, if you do not use proper protocols, equipment, and safety checks required with blood flow moderation training used with KAATSU. As always, the athlete safety and recovery is our first concern and KAATSU researched system sets the standard
."

Saunders concluded after winning the NYFC Player of the Month in May 2015, "I couldn't believe the results at first, but I had faith in Dr. Stray-Gundersen and KAATSU, and I just wanted to get back on track as fast as the skier did. I am now stronger, faster and quicker than I was before my injury."

Details:
January 6th 2014: Left ACL reconstruction with Right hamstring graft
January 14th 2014: Alter-G and KAATSU protocols re-started within first post-op week [above photo shows left 8 weeks post op
April 2014: 12 weeks post-op: gait, girth and strength of quadriceps normal and symmetric to contra-lateral side. Instituted drills on the pitch
May-June 2014: Return to normal training/practice.
July 2014: First game, 23 weeks post op
March 2015: MLS Player of the Month

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

KAATSU Lecture Series - James Stray-Gundersen, MD

For who? Physicians, physical therapists, chiropractors, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Strength, stamina, functional movement, rehabilitation, recovery















Dr. James Stray-Gundersen received his Board Certification in General Surgery in 1985. He then completed Post Doctoral Fellowships in Cardiovascular Physiology and Human Nutrition at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School where he received appointments as Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, and Physiology.

While on faculty, over 20 years at UTSW, Dr. Stray-Gundersen conducted research and built and directed two World Class Human Performance Centers associated with leading hospitals, St. Paul and Baylor. Dr. Stray-Gundersen’s primary interest and area of research is maximal human performance, the physiology of health and fitness/wellness through exercise prescription, markers of overtraining, nutrition as it applies to performance and health, altitude acclimatization and training (pioneered Live Hi/Train Low), and anti doping (developed anti doping test SAFE – Safe and Fair Events).

Since 1984, Stray-Gundersen has worked with numerous Olympians in various sport disciplines advising on training for Maximal Human Performance and has an ongoing relationship with the great runner and director of the NIKE Oregon Project, Alberto Salazar. Dr. Stray-Gundersen lead the first invasive anti-doping research at the World Championships in Lahti, Finland in 1985 and his work continues with the development and implementation of the SAFE Test — Safe and Fair Events — considered by some the most aggressive blood profiling test in the fight against cheating. He has been an official physician/consultant of United States, Norwegian, and Canadian Olympic Teams, and an official member of over 15 World Championships.

Stray-Gundersen has served on International Medical Committees that include the International Olympic Committee, FIFA, International Biathlon Committee, International Ski Federation, and the International Skating Union. He has worked with the World Anti Doping Association (WADA) and the US Anti Doping Agency (USADA). Dr. Stray-Gundersen is the Sports Science Director for the US Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA), and continues to lead Human Performance and Altitude Camps for Olympic Athletes, Masters Athletes, as well as Navy Seals to optimize performance. He runs The SG Performance Medicine Center and Sport Technologies for Maximal Athletic Performance, overall fitness, weight loss, and recovery in Frisco, Texas, and the center in Park City, Utah, located inside The Center of Excellence USSA Building.

Serving as an authority on human performance, rules, and safety of athletes, Dr. Stray-Gundersen has served on a number of International Medical Committees including the International Olympic Committee Medical Committee, the International Ski Federation Medical Committee, the International Biathlon Committee, International Skating Union, World Anti Doping Agency, the US Anti Doping Agency, FIFA, and NASA.

Dr. Stray-Gundersen gave the lecture above at the University of Tokyo at the annual KAATSU Symposium at the invitation of KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, MD, PhD in 2014.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

How Do I Use My KAATSU Cycle 2.0 For My Arms?

For who? Baby Boomers, retirees, competitive athletes, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Strength, stamina, functional movement





After people receive their new KAATSU equipment, they often ask for guidance looking for specific exercises to do with KAATSU the Original BFR.

Q1. How do I use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0?
Q2. What exercises should I do?
Q3. How am I supposed to workout?

The answers and recommendations entirely depend on what goals you are looking to achieve.

C1. I just want to get fit.
C2. I want to get stronger.
C3. I want to reduce the pain in my shoulders.

Each of these goals can require a number of specific exercises performed daily under the guidance of a personal trainer. Or, alternatively and strategically, you are easily use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for systemic gains in strength, muscle tone, flexibility and mobility.

The easiest and most convenient form of KAATSU exercises for the upper body are the Standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the arms. As you turn the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 on, simply do repeated sets of Hand Clenches (i.e., repeatedly and slowly opening and closing your hands while spreading out your fingers), Biceps Curls (i.e., with a clenched fist, bring your hand slowly and repeatedly up towards your shoulder), and Triceps Extensions (i.e., with a clenched fist, move your hand slowly and repeatedly downwards and backwards).

You can also do any number of upper body stretches or calisthenics including standing close to a wall and pushing your body away from the wall (i.e., Wall Push-ups). You can do the Wall Push-ups during the 30 seconds when the KAATSU Air Bands are inflated with air - and then rest while the bands are deflated. You can also do Desk Push-ups or Regular Push-ups, which will be significantly more difficult, depending on the level of intensity that you wish.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

How Do I Use My KAATSU Cycle 2.0 For My Legs And Core?

For who? Baby Boomers, retirees, competitive athletes, physical therapists
For what? Strength, stamina, functional movement, mobility, recovery





After people receive their new KAATSU equipment, they often ask for guidance and look for specific exercises to do with KAATSU the Original BFR.

Q1. How do I use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0?
Q2. What exercises should I do?
Q3. How am I supposed to workout?

The answers and recommendations entirely depend on what goals you are looking to achieve.

C1. I just want to get fit.
C2. I want to get stronger.
C3. I don't want my back to always hurt.

Each of these goals can require a number of specific exercises performed daily under the guidance of a personal trainer. Or, alternatively and strategically, you are easily use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for systemic gains in strength, muscle tone, flexibility and mobility.

Let's assume that you prefer to work on your legs and core. In this case, you can put aside your KAATSU Air Bands for your arms for the moment and simply focus on using the longer and thicker KAATSU Air Bands for your legs.

Wrap the KAATSU Air Bands around your upper legs as high up on your groin as possible. You should wrap the bands around your legs while you are sitting comfortably in a chair. The bands should be placed on snugly so you can barely put a finger between the bands and your skin.




































1. Click on G (GROUP) on the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and L (LOW) on the top side of the unit to start the unit. The unit will automatically go through 8 repetitions of 30 seconds of pressure followed by 5 seconds of rest. The pressure starts at 80 SKU (Standard KAATSU Units) and increases each repetition by 10 SKU, ending on 150 SKU (see chart above). This will continue to 4 minutes and then automatically stop.

2. For the next cycle, click on G (GROUP) and the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and M (MEDIUM) on the top side of the unit to start your second cycle.

3. For the next cycle, click on G (GROUP) and the face of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and H (HIGH) on the top side of the unit to start your second cycle. You can continue increasing your pressure as you wish (e.g., PRO LOW, PRO MEDIUM, PRO HIGH).

4. During these cycles, you are simply walk ("KAATSU Walking") or do the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises. The Standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the legs include Toe Curls (as you sit comfortably without your shoes on), Toe Raises (as you sit comfortably without your shoes on), and Heel Raises (as you sit comfortably). The Advanced KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the legs include Standing Heel Raises (as you stand comfortably), Leg Curls (as you stand comfortably and raise one leg to your buttocks as you hold onto a chair or the wall), and Quarter Squats (as you squat slowly and comfortably up and down).

5. You can also do any number of stretches or calisthenic exercises.

6. For improved balance, you can wear the bands as you balance on one leg or walk with a book on your head. You can also pace back and forth on a soft yoga mat or walk barefooted on the sand.

7. If you want to do more difficult exercises, you can do Lunges with one leg until you reach muscular failure (and then switch legs), Burpees, or lie flat on your back and raise your feet slightly off the ground.

8. You can also do Step-ups on a box at your fitness gym, walk or jog on a treadmill, or use a spinning bicycle or recumbent bicycle for 10-15 minutes, alternatively modifying intensity.

9. For less-intensive exercises, you can simply sit straight up in a chair or couch with your hips near the edge. Slowly exhale and slowly lean forward, tightening your abdominal muscles as strongly as possible until your stomach is close to your legs. Hold and then slowly inhale air on your return to a sitting position with good posture. Repeat as desired.

Although it is not intuitive, the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs will result in healthful systemic effects that are felt and seen throughout your body, including your core and upper body.

Most individuals are not motivated to do planks, crunches and other forms of abdominal work. Instead, KAATSU users can do a number of simple KAATSU exercises to strengthen their lower back and tighten their core.

Core and lower back exercises can comprise of your entire KAATSU training session for the day. Alternatively, core and lower back exercises can be an addition to your typical KAATSU sessions.

Core & Lower Back #1 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot, balancing only on your other leg for as long as possible.
4. When your balance is lost, rest for 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
5. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
6. This act of balancing will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #2 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to the Optimal SKU.
3. Place a book on your head and walk slowly until the book falls off.
4. Rest 10-20 seconds and repeat the walk again two more times with the book on your head.
5. Walking straight slowly, especially on an uneven surface like a sandy beach, will create instability in your core and will help strengthen your stomach and lower back.

Core & Lower Back #3 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your Optimal SKU.
3. Stand on one foot while holding a water bottle in each hand.
4. Hold the water bottle in your outstretched arms and stand as long as possible on one leg.
5. When your balance is lost, rest 10-20 seconds and repeat two more times.
6. After 3 times, balance on your other foot.
7. In order to make this exercise more difficult, move your outstretched arms left and right, and up and down in an asymmetric manner while balancing on one foot.

Core & Lower Back #4 Exercise
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Do planks as usual.
4. Alternatively, tighten the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms at your Optimal SKU and do planks as normal.

Core & Lower Back #5 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly bring one leg one up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knee with your arms to stretch your back.
4. Repeat as desired.
5. Continue to lie on your back and slowly pull both your legs up to your stomach and hold. Grab your knees with your arms to stretch your back.
6. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #6 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift your hips off the floor and hold. Bring your hips to the ground and repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #7 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly lift both your feet off the ground and hold. Repeat as desired.
4. Lie on your back, lift both your feet off the ground, and kick your feet slightly off the ground. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #8 Exercise
1. Tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your appropriate Base SKU.
2. Inflate your KAATSU Air Bands on your legs at your Optimal SKU.
3. Lie on your back and slowly pandiculate (i.e., stretch and stiffen your trunk and limbs, extending your toes, feet, arms and hands as you do upon waking).
4. Repeat as desired.

Core & Lower Back #9 Exercise
1. KAATSU Aqua Sit-ups are used by competitive aquatic athletes with a Bosu Ball. 2. Start horizontal in the water while grabbing onto a Bosu Ball; then climb on top of the Bosu Ball. Do 3 sets to failure.



Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU Lecture Series - Peter T. Lansbury, PhD

For who? Physicians, physical therapists, chiropractors, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Neurology, stamina, functional movement















Peter T. Lansbury, PhD is the Chief Scientific Officer at Lysosomal Therapeutics and Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School who was one of the early adopters of KAATSU the Original BFR.

Professor Lansbury received his AB (cum laude) in chemistry from Princeton University in 1980 and subsequently received his PhD in organic chemistry from Harvard University in 1985 under the direction of Nobel laureate E. J. Corey. His postdoctoral fellowship was spent at the Rockefeller University, working with the late Tom Kaiser. In 1988, he accepted a position as assistant professor of chemistry at MIT and was promoted to associate professor in 1993.

He moved to his current position at the Center of Neurologic Diseases in 1996 and was promoted to professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School in 2004. During this time, he founded the Laboratory for Drug Discovery in Neurodegeneration and the Morris K. Udall NIH Parkinson’s Disease Research Center of Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, which he directed for 10 years.

He was the founder of Link Medicine, and served as its chief scientific officer from 2005 until its sale to AstraZeneca in 2012. He is currently chief scientific officer of Lysosomal Therapeutics, Inc., a company focused on developing disease-modifying therapeutics for Parkinson’s and related diseases.

Professor Lansbury gave the lecture above at the University of Tokyo at the annual KAATSU Symposium at the invitation of KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, MD, PhD. in 2014.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Real Warriors, Weekend Warriors



KAATSU Global's John Doolittle does a lot with the time he has available to him.

But every year, the former Navy SEAL Captain donates his time and talents to help raise money and awareness for the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim, a 5 km bay swim held in Tampa Bay, Florida as a charity fundraiser for the Navy SEAL Foundation.

Not many swimming competitions kick off when Supermen bolt down from the high heavens and parachute down right smack on the starting line. But The Frogman Swim is as unique as its volunteer directors and organizers. And few swims - if any - raise money like the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim does.

Nominated for the 2019 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year [vote here], the swim outdid itself again last weekend. It is on track to raise well over US$725,000 with fewer than 200 swimmers.

This year's overall winner was 1996 and 2000 Olympic gold medalist, mother and still-speedy nearly 40-year-old Brooke Bennett, but the real winners included everyone involved from the Gold Star Families to the Navy SEAL Foundation.

For more event information or to donate, visit www.tampabayfrogman.com

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Relieving Back Pain, Strengthening The Back With KAATSU

For who? Physical therapists, chiropractors, KAATSU Specialists
For what? Back pain, functional movement





















Back pain is one of the most common ailments and complaints people experience, especially as they age, gain weight or become increasingly sedentary.

Back pain comes in myriad forms: muscle ache, shooting/stabbing pain, pain/numbness/tingling radiating down the legs, increasing pain with bending, lifting, standing or walking, or pain that improves with reclining.

Whether the back pain is caused by muscle or ligament strain, bulging or ruptured disks, arthritis, scoliosis, or osteoporosis, KAATSU users often find relief by doing the following movements and protocols using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit and the KAATSU Air Bands:

KAATSU Cycle Arm Warm-up
* Snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms and do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.
* You can do simple movements of your arms that can include writing emails and sewing to non-weighted biceps curls and triceps extensions.

KAATSU Cycle Leg Warm-up
* Remove KAATSU Air Bands from your arms and snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs.
* Do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures on your legs.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.

* You can do some or all of these simple movements:

** Sit up straight (as possible) in a chair, non-slouched with good posture your feet flat on the floor, shoulders back and torso engaged, looking forward while breathing comfortably.
** Stand up straight (as possible) and pace comfortably back and forth in your room. If you do this is a fitness room or gym, take off your shoes and walk on yoga mats or any other kind of soft, spongy surface.
** Stretch your lower back and legs in any number of ways. One particularly effective stretch is to slightly elevate your toes off the ground and bend forward at your waist, letting your arms hang to your feet. There is no need to strain yourself, just bend over comfortably.
** Do the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for your Legs (see here including Toe Curls, Toe Raises, Heel Raises, Standing Leg Curls, and Quarter Squats).

** With your feet shoulder width apart, stand comfortably while slightly bending your knees and holding water bottles in both your hands down at your sides. Lean slightly forward at an angle while maintaining a straight back. Do not move your hips while you lift your arms forward as high as possible. Repeat 5-10 times.

Key Points
* Be very well hydrated before and during the KAATSU Cycles.
* The color of your skin on your arms and legs should be a pinker or redder tone than normal while doing KAATSU. This indicates that your blood circulation is improved with the KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Remove immediately if your skin becomes clammy or cold or you feel lightheaded.
* You will quickly feel fatigue, much more quickly than if you did the same exercise without KAATSU Air Bands on your arms.
* Repeat this exercise daily or, if so motivated, twice per day (both in the morning and afternoon or evening).
* Place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on your limbs. Snugly means that you can put one finger between the KAATSU Air Bands and your skin - but not two or three fingers. If you can put two or three fingers between the bands and your skin, the bands should be manually tightened a bit more.
* Your back should gradually feel looser and more flexible. As this feeling improves, you can increase your pressure levels and range of motion - but it should all be done gradually and comfortably.


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

KAATSU for Shin Splints

For who? Tactical athletes, competitive athletes, physical therapists, chiropractors
For what? Shin splints, recovery



























Young military recruits, new triathletes, distance runners or anyone beginning a new fitness program occasionally experience shin splints (medial tibial stress syndrome).

The pain runs along the inner edge of the shinbone (tibia) due to inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and bone tissue around the tibia. While resting, icing, stretching, and over-the-counter pain relievers are the most common treatments, doing KAATSU Cycles are also a faster way to return to a pain-free state and can help prevent shin splints in the first place.

The constant (or increased) pounding on pavement or wherever you are running overworks the muscles, tendons and bone tissue. Tenderness, soreness, swelling and pain occurs. If the intensity or distance continues, the shin splints can progress to a stress reaction or stress fracture.

Prevention
Because shin splints are caused by repetitive stress on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach the muscles to the bone, it is critical to strengthen these muscles, tendons, and bone tissue.

Athletes can start doing repeated KAATSU Cycles using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 (or KAATSU Wearables in the future) while walking (i.e., KAATSU Walking). It is recommended to place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on the upper legs (not allowing more than 2 fingers to put placed between the KAATSU Air Bands and the skin) and then do the first KAATSU Cycle on the GROUP LOW level while walking comfortably. This first cycle runs for 4 minutes.

When the first cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the GROUP MEDIUM level while walking comfortably. After 4 minutes, this second cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the GROUP HIGH level. At this point, the athlete can begin a slow jog or do faster (power) walking.

After the third cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the PRO LOW level while walking fast or jogging slowly. After 4 minutes, this cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the PRO MEDIUM level on the fifth cycle while jogging or walking as quickly as possible (depending on one's stamina).

For the last and sixth cycle, the pressure is increased to the PRO HIGH level.

Recovery
If you are already experiencing shin splints, you should do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles both before and after running. This can be in combination with icing, stretching and taking over-the-counter pain relievers. It is important to begin at a lower pressure (e.g., Group mode on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, and then proceed to higher pressures in the latter cycles).

Many athletes also find great relief in doing another set of 3-6 KAATSU Cycles less than an hour before going to bed at night.

Others also find additional relief in doing a set of 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their arms while doing repeated Hand Clenches, Biceps Curls and Triceps Extensions (i.e., KAATSU 3-Point Arm Exercises).

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, January 4, 2020

KAATSU Skin Care: Using KAATSU Before And After Getting A Tattoo

For who? Tattoo artists
For what? Tattoo recovery






























Tattoo on arm after 3½ hours.






























Tattoo on arm after 5 hours.

KAATSU Cycles, properly applied, has always been good for pre-surgery preparations and post-surgery recovery, especially with sutures on the skin [see here and below].

Dave Carlson, a renowned water polo coach in Los Alamitos, California and a regular user of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, came up with the KAATSU the Original BFR tattoo protocol (the "Carlson Protocol").

Carlson has several tattoos and he understands very well the inflammation and pain that comes with a new tattoo.

But one hour before his most recent tattoo session, he used his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to do 3 progressive KAATSU Cycle sets on his legs followed by 4 progressive KAATSU Cycles on his arms. He had the tattoo above inked on his arm.

Then he did 3 KAATSU Cycle sets (Low, Medium, High) after the session was over. Then he went to his local gym and worked out with 3 additional KAATSU Cycles on Group Low (the lowest setting possible on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0).

He then took off the bandage 1½ hours after he got his new tattoo, washed with soap and water, and applied Aquaphor. To his surprise, he then took the photo above 3½ hours after the tattoo session was over.

He explained his impressions, "What is unusual is that there was very little or no swelling, my skin is not sensitive to the touch, and my skin under and near the tattoo is not sure or inflamed. My skin is normally sensitive and hurts to touch after I get a tattoo. The area around the tattoo normally rises for a few days after I get it. But with the KAATSU Cycle protocol, this is the least amount of swelling and pain that I have ever had after removing the bandage.

I mean, there is ZERO swelling. It looks like someone drew a picture with ink on my arm. My tattoo is usually puffy and the skin around it is red. But there is no inflammation - and ZERO pain.

Zero swelling and zero pain. I am not exaggerating when I say zero pain
."

The photo on left was taken 6½ hours after the tattoo session. Carlson's arm is engorged in blood in the middle of the 4th KAATSU Cycle. His first KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Low level (with 250 maximum SKU); the second KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Medium level (with 350 maximum SKU), the third KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU), and the fourth KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU).

KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato explained the mechanism behind this phenomenon that KAATSU users can experience. "We have found that KAATSU leads to a decrease in CRP, C-reactive protein which is a blood test marker for inflammation in the body. CRP levels increase in response to inflammation.

This is why people who have arthritis or are experiencing different kinds of pain - including getting a tattoo - report feeling significant relief after bouts of KAATSU.

While there is also an increase in HGH (Human Growth Hormone), nitric oxide, IGF-1 (insulin growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), KAATSU also has shown to decrease CRP.

Typically with pain comes inflammation and the CRP increases. But with KAATSU, the decrease in CRP and production of EPC (endothelial progenitor cell) help. EPC are cells that help regenerate the endothelial lining of your blood vessels
."

Repeated KAATSU Cycles has repeatedly shown to enhance the body's natural healing process, especially when the skin is cut, torn, broken or inked.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global