Monday, August 19, 2019

Slimming Your Legs With KAATSU

Many individuals are initially attracted to KAATSU due to cosmetic reasons. They simply want to lose weight or tone their bodies in some way.

Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, the inventor of KAATSU, writes that thigh muscles are strengthened and legs can be slimmed especially when people are overweight and they experience swelling or have loose skin in their lower body. Swelling is relieved by promoting blood circulation - which is what KAATSU can achieve for people.

In order to strengthen your inner thighs, you can spin on a stationary bicycle or casually do KAATSU Walking for 10-20 minutes - or do these following exercises 10 - 20 times each.

Dr. Sato explains, "You can lie flat on your back on the floor with your hands clasped behind your head. Lift your legs together straight up from the floor. Concentrate on the muscles of your inner thigh and open your legs as widely as possible and then slowly close them 10-20 times.

It will not be easy in the beginning, but your legs will gradually get stronger
."

If this is not possible in the beginning, you can do simple KAATSU Walking (i.e., walking comfortably with the KAATSU Leg Bands on) for up to 20 minutes - or even more simply the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for the Legs.

The KAATSU Air Bands should be placed snugly on your legs. Snugly means that you can put one finger between the KAATSU Air Bands and your skin - but not two or three fingers. If you can put two or three fingers between the bands and your skin, the bands should be manually tightened a bit more.

Dr. Sato continues, "You can also stand straight with your arms placed on your hips. Spread your legs wider than your shoulders and stand with your toes pointed outward. While exhaling, lower your hips slowly as low as you can safely go. Then return to your standing position in order to strengthen the muscles of your inner thighs.

Alternatively, you can stand straight with your arms placed on your hips. Spread your legs wider than your shoulders and turn your toes inward. Lower your hips as much as safely possible to the level where your knees touch each other. Then slowly return to the standing position in order to strengthen the muscles of your outer thighs
."

KAATSU 3-point Exercises are a fundamental part of the standard KAATSU protocol for your legs.

Dr. Sato first established and fine-tuned the KAATSU 3-point Exercises during the 1970s for individuals of all ages and from all backgrounds whether they are athletes or de-conditioned overweight individuals. These simple exercises have been performed safely and effectively among millions of individual KAATSU sessions among people of all ages and abilities with myriad physical conditions or ailments.

The KAATSU 3-point Exercises can either be used to help determine the optimal SKU pressure or as a form of basic exercise for both the arms and legs. After the Base SKU (manually applied pressure) is established, then the KAATSU 3-point Exercises is a means to determine if the Optimal SKU (inflated pressure of the pneumatic bands) is appropriate (read a more detailed explanation here).

Alternatively, especially for Baby Boomers and adults who are being reconditioned back to a state of wellness through a simple exercise program, the KAATSU 3-point Exercises can consist of their entire KAATSU training program.

When the KAATSU 3-point Exercises are performed, the exercises can be performed either on a KAATSU Master or a KAATSU Nano or a KAATSU Cycle unit. The KAATSU 3-point Exercises can be performed while the user is either tethered (connected) or untethered (disconnected) to the units.

KAATSU Leg 3-point Exercises [illustrations posted on left]

The KAATSU 3-point Exercises for the legs are either defined as Standard or Advanced.

The Standard KAATSU 3-point Exercises for the legs involves toe curls, toe raises, and heel raises. These are all performed while the user is seated comfortably with good posture on a chair. In general, these are preferred for older or less fit individuals or those just starting an exercise program or KAATSU.

The Advanced KAATSU 3-point Exercises for the legs are alternatively used by more fit or active individuals or for those individuals with more experience in KAATSU. These 3 basic exercises includes heel raises, leg curls and squats. The heel raises can be done while sitting or standing. The leg curls can be performed while standing and holding onto a chair or balancing against a wall. The squats (or "chair touches") can be performed while bending the knees to touch a chair and then popping back up.

Ideally, the squats are "non-lock" (partial extension) so that the muscles are constantly engaged and there is no rest while the knees are "locked" straight (in a full extension). This will build up fatigue and lactic acid more quickly.

Each set of exercises should be done 3-4 times each with a maximum of 20 seconds between each set. Ideally, the number of repetitions for each exercise decreases before the user reaches muscular or technical failure (or fatigues).

That is, an ideal set would be 25-30 repetitions on set #1, 10-15 repetitions on set #2, and 5-10 repetitions on set #3. Even if only 1-2 repetitions are completed on the last set, this failure signal sent to the central nervous system is one of the goals of KAATSU.

KAATSU Arm 3-point Exercises [illustrations posted here]

The KAATSU 3-point Exercises for the arms involves hand clenches, bicep curls and tricep extensions. Each set of exercises is done 3 times each with a maximum of 20 seconds rest between each set. Ideally, the number of repetitions for each exercise decreases before the user reaches muscular or technical failure*.

That is, an ideal set would be 25-30 repetitions on set #1, 10-15 repetitions on set #2, and 5-10 repetitions on set #3. Even if only 1-2 repetitions are completed on the last set, this failure signal sent to the central nervous system is one of the goals of KAATSU.

* Technical failure is defined when the individual starts to do improper technique (movement) due to an increasing sense of fatigue. At this point, the set is stopped.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Marie-Claude Légaré Doing KAATSU



Massothérapie sportive Marie-Claude Légaré of clinique universelle in Boisbriand, Québec, Canada shows her private training session under the guidance of Claude Groulx, a KAATSU Specialist and the most renowned bodybuilding Québécois.

Légaré was trained on KAATSU by Groulx who is located at the Zoo Health Club in Boynton Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida.

Copyright © 2019 by Marie-Claude Légaré

Unleashing Your Potential...At Any Age

KAATSU 101 includes a number of articles describing various easy-to-understand applications and health benefits of KAATSU for people of all ages and from all walks of life.

BFR (Blood Flow Restriction) and Occlusion Training are defined and often promoted by young men, bodybuilders or individuals who are focused on muscle building. Conversely, KAATSU is meant for everyone including - and especially for - those who are deconditioned (out-of-shape), lazy, older, or injured.

BFR and Occlusion Training often use inexpensive products, produced inexpensively, with inexact means to measure or understand precise or specific pressures.

KAATSU, on the other hand, has stood the test of time across 47 countries, being used by millions of individuals - ranging from 4 to 104 years old - during innumerable KAATSU sessions. KAATSU is frequently used by professional and Olympic athletes, but also by Paralympic athletes and disabled military veterans.

But the largest demographic group, by far, who uses KAATSU are aging Baby Boomers; those between the ages of 50 - 80.

These Baby Boomers are generally not focused on building biceps or broad shoulders, but more specifically on maintaining pain-free overall wellness or doing effective, efficient rehabilitation from injuries and surgeries. Their interest in KAATSU is more functional rather than cosmetic, more focused on generating a healthful hormonal response rather than getting bigger muscles.

As 75.8 million American Baby Boomers either transition from the end of their careers or are in full or partial retirement, many of them have spent their most recent years raising children, financing college educations, paying for weddings, and helping out with grandchildren. These pressures have played havoc with their fitness levels.

Previously over-stressed, overworked, and under-exercised, the Baby Boomers are now facing much more free time. But with their higher body fat percentages, lowered muscle mass, and lessened aerobic capacities, getting back into shape is not easy. A change of lifestyle and a change in mindset are required. But this is easier said than done.

"KAATSU can present an easy-to-implement catalyst for individuals over the age of 50 to return to their former selves," says Paul Grzymkowski, the former president of Gold's Gym Franchising. "10,000 Baby Boomers in America will celebrate their 65th birthday every day for the next 2 decades (3,650,000 new Baby Boomers per year). This is a huge market for every fitness professional to consider."

A 65-year-old man or women sees the rest of their life much differently than they did at the age of 25 or 35. The quality of life is their focus, but it is at this time that their muscles have faded (or are fading) and various ailments are regular experiences.

"We must recondition the 26% of the total U.S. population in innovative ways, using modalities that are self-sustaining and much more low-impact than what we used to do in our youth or even mid-age," added Grzymkowski. "Heavy barbells and dumbbells are not ideal equipment to serve as a catalyst to whipping Baby Boomers into shape. Aerobics, spinning, and elliptical machines are also not for everyone. We have to look for something even more revolutionary."

Grzymkowski, a 67-year-old veteran of the fitness industry, has spent his lifetime around barbells, dumbbells, and spinning bikes. But he has substituted the iron of his youth for the pneumatic bands used by his counterparts in Japan. "I have not changed - I love feeling pumped when I exercise. When I feel my biceps bulge or my quads burn, it recalls my strength of former years. But I am doing this and changing my body shape without heavy weights. I am doing it with pneumatic bands and the KAATSU equipment that are used so effectively by senior citizens in Japan and elite athletes around the world. When I do use weights during my KAATSU workout I tend to use light dumbbells or weight plates of no more than 5-pounds."

KAATSU is a Japanese word that means 'additional pressure' in English.

KAATSU is done with pneumatic bands that are inflated to safe levels by a mobile electronic touch panel device. The bands are a proven means to safely modify the blood flow during exercise and improve blood circulation in the limbs. This modification leads to pooling of blood in the muscles that leads to significant human growth hormone secretion and a literal tricking of the brain into thinking the body is doing vigorous exercise - when the KAATSU user could be doing simple walking or stretching in place.

Some of the simplest KAATSU exercise include hand clenches and bicep curls without light weights, heel raises or leg curls while standing up, or easy walking.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Monday, August 5, 2019

Doing KAATSU With Cancer

In 2014 when he had first started using KAATSU with his patients and clients, Dr. Jim Stray-Gundersen wondered if KAATSU was safe and effective for a patient who had survived a bout of breast cancer.

Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, the inventor of KAATSU, answered him with an emphatic yes. "Of course, every patient should check with their own physician. Fundamentally, if a patient is allowed to do exercise by their physician, then they can safely do the KAATSU Cycle with the assistance of an experienced KAATSU Master Specialist."

The American Cancer Society reports that exercise is important when it comes to cancer: "Exercise may lower cancer risk by helping control weight and strengthen the immune system, and it can boost quality of life during cancer treatment."

A 2016 study from researchers at the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute linked exercise with a lower risk of 13 specific types of cancer.

The study was published May 16th in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The study found that "leisure-time physical activity was associated with a significantly decreased risk of not only these 3 cancers, but also esophageal cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer, kidney cancer, and myeloid leukemia. In addition, physical activity was strongly associated with a decreased risk of multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, as well as cancers of the head and neck, rectum, bladder, and lung (in current and former smokers)."

Walking 20 minutes per mile is considered moderate intensity. The American Cancer Society recommends that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week (or a combination of these). The organization suggests that these recommendations can be reached by walking for 30 minutes 5 days per week during your lunch break.

Dr. Sato lectures frequently about how KAATSU enables moderate exercise to be achieved with less time and lower intensity - an especially important factor for the aging Baby Boomer population. "The onset of cancer is related to the weakening of immunity. Growth hormone, which is secreted in large amounts with KAATSU, has an effect on improving immunity. Unless your own physician recommends no exercise or physical activity, then KAATSU is often done by cancer patients or cancer survivors."

He recalled the experiences of two patients. "When KAATSU was performed by a patient with ovarian cancer metastasized to the lung, the tumor marker - immunosuppressive acidic protein which is a factor that weakens immunity - was significantly reduced.

In addition, Teruo Sugihara, a Japanese professional golfer, developed prostate cancer at the age of 60 years. He succeeded in reducing the size of the tumor with diet and KAATSU.

KAATSU can be performed in short duration - up to 20 minutes at a time - no matter what your age or gender. You can do KAATSU with no special facilities or equipment; just walking casually with KAATSU leg bands
."

If patients are particularly weak, de-conditioned, significantly overweight, or unmotivated to do any kind of vigorous exercise including doing KAATSU Walking outside, they can comfortably do the standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises in the KAATSU Cycle mode in the comfort of their home or office.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

What Happens In The Brain After Doing KAATSU?



Dr. Gary E. Strangman of the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues Doctors Vladimir Ivkovic, Quan Zhang, Aaron Baggish, Adam Cohen, Brian Nahed, Aaron Dentinger, Eric Bershad, and Eric Rosenthal looked into testing KAATSU equipment for its potential to reduce elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in astronauts and those in zero gravity conditions.

In their report, Dr. Strangman notes, "In a handful of astronauts, elevated ICP has been found days or months post‐flight (measured by lumbar puncture). This visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) condition varies notably across astronauts.

To date, no countermeasures have been tested for VIIP, although two countermeasures have been utilized in spaceflight to mitigate in‐flight cephalad fluid shifts (and related cardiovascular changes): (1) Russian‐made Braslet thigh cuffs, and (2) lower‐body negative pressure (LBNP). Both help redistribute blood from the upper body into the lower extremities, for a more Earth‐equivalent fluid distribution. Both have operational challenges, including availability, obtrusiveness, and calibration
."

So they studied and tested KAATSU.

His explanation is posted above.

In Japan at the University of Tokyo Hospital, its cardiologists also studied blood flow in the brain with subjects doing KAATSU and documented the resultant improved blood flow in the brain when subjects were tested with MRI scanners.



































Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, July 13, 2019

The Michaels Prepare For The World Swimming Championships



Michael Andrew explains and shows his preparations for the upcoming FINA World Championships in Singapore, that includes use of the KAATSU Nano and KAATSU Air Bands.

Fellow American sprinter Michael Chadwick also uses his KAATSU equipment in his training and taper period leading up to and during the most important international championships before the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

KAATSU Effect Affect Total Knee Replacement

Repeated KAATSU Cycles can help enhance the body's natural healing process.

These five periodically taken photographs show the rapid recovery of the sutures and skin on a 49-year-old patient who had total knee replacement surgery.

The patient repeated KAATSU Cycles (3 minutes 20 seconds of increased pressure) in the morning and evenings as he integrated KAATSU to his regularly scheduled physical therapy.

"One thing that we have seen time and time again is how quickly the skin and wound heals," says Steven Munatones. "The skin around the wound can heal so quickly with repeated KAATSU Cycles that the skin grows over the sutures - much faster than what is normally expected by physicians.

This can cause an unanticipated post-surgical issue if the skin grows over the sutures. When physicians schedule the normal removal of the sutures, patients utilizing regular KAATSU Cycles will often experience faster than normal healing of wounds and incisions. So, a patient should inform their attending physician of this phenomenon
."






















































































































































Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Exclusivia Podcast On KAATSU






























Courtesy of Exclusivia.

It’s never been easier to lose yourself in the blur of modern life...anyone who wants to join as a member of Exclusivia would have a front row seat to opportunities that create more value and more progress in the enrichment of their own life. I think there’s a huge unmet need for that in the world," said Dr. Robert Cooper, Ph.D., a neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author with over 4 million books sold, a leading high-performance business strategist, and the founder of Cooper Strategic.

Exclusivia highlighted KAATSU, a technology that can easily fit within the blur of modern life. Exclusivia's Bradley Binversie talked about the Japanese invention on Exclusivia's latest podcast [see here].

To learn more about the history and applications of KAATSU, listen to CEO Steven Munatones here who does KAATSU Aqua in the water and KAATSU Cycles on dryland [shown above with KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato].



























Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Monday, July 8, 2019

Jamal Hill Going Places


Jamal Hill of Inglewood, California struggles with the degenerative disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth - but not much else.

The personable entrepreneur and KAATSU user is a member of the USA Paralympic swim team and is looking forward to competing in the 2020 Tokyo and 2024 Paris Paralympic Games despite living with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which is an inherited disorder that causes nerve damage in his arms and legs. The disease results in smaller, weaker muscles, a loss of sensation and muscle contractions, and difficulty walking. In Hill's case, it significantly reduces the mobility in his legs where his motor function stops at his knee caps and his motor function in my arms is also impacted.

[The disease] runs in my family,” Hill explained. “It affects my mom a little bit. It affects my uncles pretty heavily. Essentially my motor neurons in my outer extremities, from my elbow to my fingertips and from my kneecaps all the way to my toes gives me a lot of problems.”

But his overwhelming positive nature has enabled him to succeed in a sport he could have easily quit many times.

Currently, Hill is ranked #1 among American Paralympic swimmers and 13th in the world going into the Olympic year. But he has also created Swimming Up Hill, a digital marketing company that markets health and fitness brands, insurance and medical practices.

At its core, Hill's mission is to teach 1 million people how to swim. He works with swim schools in Southern California to help the schools facilitate more lessons for lower cost to the customer.

Hill balances his work at Swimming Up Hill with his participation on the World Para Swimming World Series 2019 where he travels the world, using his KAATSU Nano for recovery.

His next major goal is to compete at the 2019 World Para-swimming Championships in London this September where he will compete among 600 swimmers from 60 nations who are trying to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics.





















Hill is shown above with his fellow KAATSU Specialist and American Paralympic swimmer Robert Griswold of Indiana.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, July 4, 2019

MIT Engineers Its Players To European Maccabi Games

MIT water polo players Miller Geschke, Ory Tasman and Daniel Yahalomi will represent the USA on its water polo team at the 15th European Maccabi Games between July 28th and August 7th in Budapest, Hungary.

The water polo team includes 11 athletes who are part of Maccabi USA, a team of over 200 American athletes who will join the other 2,000 Jewish athletes from 29 countries, participating in 22 different sports.

Geschke, a 2018 American Collegiate Water Polo Coaches All-American, led the MIT Engineers with 58 goals and 28 assists this past season and led MIT to a #2 ranking in the Collegiate Water Polo Association's Division III national poll.

Yahalomi played for MIT between 2014 and 2017 while Tasman was also an All-American in 2015 who still holds MIT's single season and career record for goals that he scored between 2012 and 2015.

The European Games are a high-level athletic competition for Jewish athletes all over the world aimed at connecting Jews from the Diaspora. They are hosted by the European Maccabi Confederation and conducted in cooperation with Maccabi World Union. They are held every four years, two years after the Maccabiah is held.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Monday, July 1, 2019

David Weinstein On The Python Protocol On The Primalosophy Podcast

Photo courtesy of CEOCFO Magazine.

Our goal is to awaken human potential by sharing precise effective tools and methods to maximize the health, happiness and performance of people who want to realize their potential," explains David Weinstein of LifeForceIQ.

Weinstein is a successful investment banker with an entrepreneurial DNA in the fields of medicine and biotechnology from Boca Raton, Florida. He had pushed himself hard in business, experiencing its negative effects after he turned 50. He knew he had to transform himself in order to enjoy the fruits of his labor.

He explained his mission and his Python Protocol (includes physical vitality + mental clarity + stress reduction + sleep & recovery) that utilizes KAATSU here on the Primalosophy Podcast. For more information about Weinstein and his LifeforceIQ, visit here.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Sunday, June 16, 2019

Jack Turner Is Off To Napoli

By all accounts, All-American water polo goalie Jack Turner should not be playing his favorite sport, heading into his final year at the University of California San Diego, and training to represent the USA in the 2019 World University Games (XXX Summer Universiade) that will be held in Naples, Italy in July 2019.

The 6'-7" Fremont, California native's improbable rehabilitation and recovery from a horrific car accident is remarkable. It is a story well told of his long drive from San Diego to San Francisco in 2017, "At 1 a.m., about a half-hour south of home, I was in in Gilroy when my truck began swerving out of control due to a blown tire."

His truck flipped over on its side and began to roll over and over again until it landed on its roof off the highway while Turner was stuck upside down, held by his seatbelt. “I was thinking, ‘Am I still alive? Can I move my toes? And then I knew I needed to get out of the car. You don’t know what condition it’s in. It’s kind of fight or flight.”

Strong and limber due to years of high-level water polo, he was able to cut himself free from the seatbelt.

Then he kicked out the passenger window and wiggled his way out of the totaled car. He felt a numbness on the back of his scalp and could not turn his head sideways.

It turned out his numbness was only one indication of the severity of his injury: a crack in his C1 vertebrae and a full fracture of his C2 vertebrae. Victims of such breaks often become quadriplegic and are occasionally fatal as a result of inability to breathe.

But Turner, an aerospace engineering major at UC San Diego, is as lucky as he is unusual and motivated. He wanted to be with his teammates and play against the best American universities and top teams around the world. While his teammate Sam Thompson took over his duties in the water polo cage during the 2017 season, ultimately becoming an All-American, Turner started his rehabilitation with a fervor and eventually was seen on the team's bench with a neck brace.

How he survived is beyond explanation, but he was determined to work himself back to water polo shape and play with his teammates - even with a neck brace on for months. “It was all pretty scary, being told that you shouldn’t be walking or breathing. But more than anything I was thinking about whether I’d be able to play again. I’d been doing it for so long — that was my identity.

I probably went through the seven stages of grief before accepting it. And then being told that it’s not over, that I could continue my career — I knew it was going to be tough, but it ignited something in me. I didn’t give up, and it would have been easy to do that with a broken neck
.”

Turner missed the entire 2017 college season, but eventually found himself back in the pool and wearing USA team gear in Europe this September.

That experience against the world's best water polo players - older, tougher, stronger, faster athletes than the competition who he would play against during the college season - gave him a massive boost of confidence. "I was nervous at first, but I got my hand on a couple of shots and thought, ‘Oh, wow, I can do this. I deserve to be here. I worked hard to be here.

Without question, one of America's best water polo goalies has experienced near tragedy and persevered in one of the most unlikely roads to success in collegiate sports today.

He and his teammates regularly do KAATSU for training, rehabilitation and recovery throughout their off-season, pre-season, mid-season and championship season.



Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

How KAATSU Can Change Outcomes


Michael Chadwick in lane 5 in the 100m Freestyle Final at the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series in Clovis, California.


Michael Chadwick in lane 6 at the 100m Freestyle Final at the 2017 arena Pro Swim Series in Atlanta, Georgia.

Michael Chadwick has been a top competitive swimmer from his young teenage years in Charlotte, North Carolina to his illustrious career at the University of Missouri.

As the most decorated swimmer in the history of the Missouri swimming program with 22 All-American honors, he has his sights on competing at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

Now swimming for Team Elite Aquatics in La Jolla, California under coach Dave Marsh, Chadwick has recently started to incorporate KAATSU Cycles into his training regimen and race-day preparations.

At his first major swimming competition after starting KAATSU, the 24-year-old broke through a previous barrier. He admitted, "I always go out fast."

At the start and at the first 50 meters in the 100m freestyle, the 6'-6" (198 cm) is nearly always in first in world-class competitions. It is the last part of the race where Chadwick has not been able to close in on victory against the world's fastest swimmers.

But things have changed: compare Chadwick in lane 6 at the 2017 Pro Swim Series race above - where he was out typically fast and leading at the 50m mark compared with his victory in lange 4 at this week's Pro Swim Series - where he went out fast, led at the 50m mark, and closed the race very strongly.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Friday, June 7, 2019

The Future Is Now With KAATSU




























Back during the planning and execution of the 22nd Century Project at the University of Tokyo Hospital in the early 2000s, Dr. Sato and Dr. Nakajima led research on KAATSU.

They - along with Japanese government demographic specialists - were preparing for Japan's future when its population would start to decrease for a number of societal factors.

Well, the future is now.

The number of newborn babies born in Japan reached a record low of 918,397 in 2018. It was the third year in a row the number of newborns were under 1 million.

Japan is the oldest and most rapidly aging country on the planet. Since 1899, the Japanese government has been conducting a census, but 2018 saw the largest overall decrease in its population in history.

In post World War II Japan, the average number of children born to women was 4.54. Now it is only 1.42 children which is higher than Japan's historic low of 1.26 in 2005, but still well below the fertility rate necessary to maintain its current population levels.

The total fertility rate has been hovering around 1.4 since 2012 after hitting a low of 1.26 in 2005. The rate fell below 2.00 in 1975, a large decrease from the rate of 4.54 seen in 1947.

"With an increasingly aging population, easy-to-use, convenient modalities such a KAATSU are becoming ever more important to the Baby Boomer population - and their elderly parents," observes Steven Munatones, Chief Executive Officer of KAATSU Global. "This is why far forward thinking companies in Japan - like their counterparts in the U.S. and Europe - are making plans and implementing innovative programs to expand the use of KAATSU with new Bluetooth-enabled, wireless handheld products in the latter half of 2019."

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Bret Lathrope Going International





























When you think of MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), international sporting competitions and water polo are two topics that are definitely not on the radar at the world-class educational institute.

But Bret Lathrope is changing that equation.

The former UCLA water polo player is now head coach for the MIT water polo team - regular users of KAATSU for athletic performance and recovery. He is guiding the team to compete at the highest echelon of collegiate water polo outside of California.

Lathrope is now being recognized for his efforts and achievements by the national governing body of water polo in the United States: USA Water Polo. He was recently announced as an assistant coach for the USA men's World University Games team, a collection of the crème de la crème of American collegiate players and coaches.

The team will compete at the 30th Summer Universiade (World University Games) between July 2nd - 14th in Naples, Italy.

For more information on MIT water polo, follow @mitwaterpolo.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Friday, May 24, 2019

KAATSU For Groin Pulls, Tears & Strains



The standard protocol for muscle injuries, including groin pulls and strains, is RICE (Rest + Ice + Compression + Elevation). Depending on the severity of the injury, individuals may want or need additional treatments to speed healing that can include: physical therapy, massage, heat and stretching, and electrotherapy.

But in the KAATSU community, KAATSU can play a significant role in healing and speeding up recovery from groin injuries (i.e., an injury or tear to the adductor (inner side) muscles of the thigh).

Whether a groin strain is experienced by a water polo player or an older adult, KAATSU is a very effective modality for significantly reducing the pain factor during recovery. For optimal results, KAATSU can be used as follows:

Key Points
o Do KAATSU Cycles on all four limbs for optimal systemic (overall) results.
o Do KAATSU Cycles at least once per day, but ideally twice per day. Optimally, do KAATSU Cycles once in the morning and once again within an hour of going to bed. If there is time, doing KAATSU Cycles in the middle of the day can also be added - all of this can be done at your home, office or during travel.
o Do KAATSU only on the injured limb for the first few (or several) KAATSU Cycles for the first days. Later, you can simultaneously and use place the KAATSU Air Bands on both limbs (both healthy and injured limbs).
o During each KAATSU session, first do KAATSU Cycles on your arms. Then proceed with KAATSU Cycles on your legs.
o Always be very well-hydrated when you do KAATSU. Well-hydrated means your urine is clear or nearly clear.
o Consult with your personal physician before starting KAATSU, especially if you think you may have a Grade 3 strain that may need surgery to repair the torn muscle or tendon.

Arm Protocols
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure).

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 100 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 150 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.

o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. Each KAATSU Cycle on the KAATSU Nano includes 8 repetitions of 20 seconds of pressure followed by 5 seconds of no pressure in sequentially increasing pressures (e.g., 100 SKU on the first repetition, 110 SKU on the second repetition, 120 SKU on the third repetition, etc. to the 8th and last repetition).
o Note 1: on the KAATSU Wearables and KAATSU Cycle 2.0 units, there are 8 repetitions of 30 seconds followed by 5 seconds on no pressure.
o Note 2: on the KAATSU Master 2.0, there are five standard SKU Levels and one customizable SKU Level.

5. Do 3-6 of these KAATSU Cycles on your arms. This will take 9-18 minutes total. These are called Cycle 20 (indicating 20 seconds of pressure) or Cycle 30 indicating 30 seconds of pressure).

6. During these KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements.
o Note 1: You can also do isometric exercises or simply contract your arm muscles in the positive and negative direction during exercise.
o Note 2: You can also do the KAATSU 3-Point Arm Exercises (i.e., Hand Clenches if possible, followed by Biceps Curls, and then Triceps Extensions).

7. After the first 2-3 days, you can add longer KAATSU Cycles. This is called Cycle 60 (i.e., 60 seconds of pressure on followed by 20 seconds of pressure off). In order to do Cycle 60, go to the KAATSU Training mode and manually input 1 minute (60 seconds) and select an appropriate SKU level (e.g., 250 SKU for 60 seconds).

8. Constantly confirm your CRT (Capillary Refill Time) on the palms of the hands and make sure your CRT is faster than 3 seconds. Your palms should be pink or even a beefy red color. There should be significant blood pooling in your arms with your veins distended.
o Note 1: Never occlude blood flow to your arms. KAATSU Air Bands are not a tourniquet. Tourniquet or blood pressure cuffs keep blood out of your arms by restricting arterial flow. KAATSU Air Bands function as the opposite of tourniquets and blood pressure cuffs. KAATSU Air Bands modify the venous flow - or blood flow from your limbs back to your torso.
o Note 2: Never feel numbness while doing KAATSU or allow your hands or arms to turn white, gray or blue. In these cases, immediately release the pressure and take off the KAATSU Air Bands.
o Note 3: There should ALWAYS be a pink color or a beefy red color in your hands and arms when doing Cycle 20 or Cycle 60. This indicates blood pooling in the limbs, bringing fresh blood to the capillaries of your entire arm.

9. Remove the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and rehydrate. Then apply the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs.

Leg Protocols
1. Manually tighten the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure). If you feel uncomfortable placing the leg band on your injured side, simply place the bands on your leg/side that is not injured.

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your leg(s) to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 150 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 250 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.
o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. Do 3-6 of these KAATSU Cycles on your leg(s). This will take 9-18 minutes total.

6. During these KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements.
o Note 1: You can also do isometric exercises or contract your leg muscles in the positive and negative direction during exercise.
o Note 2: You can also do the Standard KAATSU 3-Point Leg Exercises (i.e., Toe curls if possible, followed by Toe Raises if possible, and then Leg Curls).
o Note 3: You can alternatively do the Advanced KAATSU 3-Point Leg Exercises (i.e., Heel Raises if possible, followed by Standing Leg Curls and then Non-Lock Quarter Squats), if you feel comfortable doing so
o Note 4: You can walk comfortably inside or outside or steadingly on a treadmill.

7. After the first 2-3 days, you can add longer KAATSU Cycles. This is called Cycle 60 (i.e., 60 seconds of pressure on followed by 20 seconds of pressure off). In order to do Cycle 60, go to the KAATSU Training mode and manually input 1 minute (60 seconds) and select an appropriate SKU level (e.g., 250 SKU for 60 seconds).

8. Constantly confirm your CRT (Capillary Refill Time) on the quadriceps above your knees or near your ankles on your calves. Make sure your CRT remains faster than 3 seconds. Your feet and legs should be pink or even a beefy red color. There should be significant blood pooling in your legs with your veins distended, particularly visible in your feet.
o Note 1: Never occlude blood flow to your legs.
o Note 2: Never feel numbness while doing KAATSU or allow your feets or legs to turn white, gray or blue. In these cases, immediately release the pressure and take off the KAATSU Air Bands.

9. Remove the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs and rehydrate.

Before Bed Arm Protocols
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure).

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 100 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 150 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.
o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. During these evening KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements or the KAATSU Insomnia Protocols that includes:
o Forward shoulder rolls
o Backward shoulder rolls
o Head rotations
o Deltoid and triceps stretching
o Note: Movements before bedtime should be casual and light. Nothing too vigorous and difficult.

5. If you wish to maintain your stamina and strength during your rehabilitation period, do comfortable KAATSU Walking or KAATSU Power Walking on a treadmill or outside for 15-20 minutes with the inflated KAATSU Air Bands on your legs (doing repeated KAATSU Cycles). Alternatively, you can also do KAATSU Aqua in a pool.

Do’s
›› Correctly place the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms and upper legs every time.
o Note : On your arms, the Bands should be placed above your biceps and triceps near your armpit, but below your deltoids.

›› Check Base SKU (pressure) and find Optimal SKU (pressure) during every KAATSU session. Optimal Pressure is one that is not so high as to occlude, but high enough to get that “KAATSU Fatigue/Failure Feeling” during exercise.
o Note: Your Optimal SKU can change on a daily basis.

›› Release the KAATSU Air Bands if you feel something is not right. If you feel lightheaded or if you have any pain on one side or the other, stop and continue on another day.

›› You can do different exercises or movements during KAATSU. You can type emails or play the piano or play computer games. Be creative and enjoy the experience.

›› Rest 30-60 seconds between different sets of exercises.

›› Do hydrate well before, during and after each KAATSU session.

Don’ts
›› Do not ever fully occlude blood flow. Signs of this are collapsed veins, no pulse at the wrist, pale palms and skin, severely delayed (>6 seconds) capillary refill.

›› Do not have Air Bands inflated for more than 20 minutes on your limbs. The KAATSU Nano will deflate automatically the KAATSU Air Bands when the maximum time is reached.

›› Do not lift heavy weights when doing KAATSU

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Using KAATSU to Recover from Broken Fingers And Toes

For optimal results from strained, sprained or broken fingers or broken toes, especially with hairline fractures, KAATSU can be used an ideal rehabilitation methodology and recovery modality.

Key Points
o Do KAATSU Cycles on all four limbs for optimal systemic results.
o Do KAATSU Cycles at least once per day, but ideally twice per day. Optimally, do KAATSU Cycles once in the morning and once again within an hour of going to bed. If there is time, doing KAATSU Cycles in the middle of the day is also recommended.
o During each KAATSU session, first do KAATSU Cycles on your arms (whether or not you have broken bones in your upper or lower body). Then proceed with KAATSU Cycles on your legs.
o Always be very well-hydrated when you do KAATSU. Well-hydrated means your urine is clear or nearly clear.
o Do KAATSU only on the injured limb for the first few (or several) KAATSU Cycles for the first days. Later, you can simultaneously and use place the KAATSU Air Bands on both limbs (both healthy and injured limbs).
o Consult with your personal physician before starting KAATSU, especially if there is a compound fracture.

Arm Protocols
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure).

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 100 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 150 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.

o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. Each KAATSU Cycle on the KAATSU Nano includes 8 repetitions of 20 seconds of pressure followed by 5 seconds of no pressure in sequentially increasing pressures (e.g., 100 SKU on the first repetition, 110 SKU on the second repetition, 120 SKU on the third repetition, etc. to the 8th and last repetition).
o Note 1: on the KAATSU Wearables and KAATSU Cycle 2.0 units, there are 8 repetitions of 30 seconds followed by 5 seconds on no pressure.
o Note 2: on the KAATSU Master 2.0, there are five standard SKU Levels and one customizable SKU Level.

5. Do 3-6 of these KAATSU Cycles on your arms. This will take 9-18 minutes total. These are called Cycle 20 (indicating 20 seconds of pressure) or Cycle 30 indicating 30 seconds of pressure).

6. During these KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements.
o Note 1: You can also do isometric exercises or simply contract your arm muscles in the positive and negative direction during exercise.
o Note 2: You can also do the KAATSU 3-Point Arm Exercises (i.e., Hand Clenches if possible, followed by Biceps Curls, and then Triceps Extensions).

7. After the first 2-3 days, you can add longer KAATSU Cycles. This is called Cycle 60 (i.e., 60 seconds of pressure on followed by 20 seconds of pressure off). In order to do Cycle 60, go to the KAATSU Training mode and manually input 1 minute (60 seconds) and select an appropriate SKU level (e.g., 250 SKU for 60 seconds).

8. Constantly confirm your CRT (Capillary Refill Time, see photo above) on the palms of the hands and make sure your CRT is faster than 3 seconds. Your palms should be pink or even a beefy red color. There should be significant blood pooling in your arms with your veins distended.
o Note 1: Never occlude blood flow to your arms. KAATSU Air Bands are not a tourniquet. Tourniquet or blood pressure cuffs keep blood out of your arms by restricting arterial flow. KAATSU Air Bands function as the opposite of tourniquets and blood pressure cuffs. KAATSU Air Bands modify the venous flow - or blood flow from your limbs back to your torso.
o Note 2: Never feel numbness while doing KAATSU or allow your hands or arms to turn white, gray or blue. In these cases, immediately release the pressure and take off the KAATSU Air Bands.
o Note 3: There should ALWAYS be a pink color or a beefy red color in your hands and arms when doing Cycle 20 or Cycle 60. This indicates blood pooling in the limbs, bringing fresh blood to the capillaries of your entire arm.

9. Remove the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and rehydrate. Then apply the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs.

Leg Protocols
1. Manually tighten the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure).

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 150 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 250 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.
o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. Do 3-6 of these KAATSU Cycles on your legs. This will take 9-18 minutes total.

6. During these KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements.
o Note 1: You can also do isometric exercises or simply contract your leg muscles in the positive and negative direction during exercise.
o Note 2: You can also do the Standard KAATSU 3-Point Leg Exercises (i.e., Toe curls if possible, followed by Toe Raises if possible, and then Leg Curls).
o Note 3: You can alternatively do the Advanced KAATSU 3-Point Leg Exercises (i.e., Heel Raises if possible, followed by Standing Leg Curls and then Non-Lock Quarter Squats).
o Note 4: You can walk comfortably inside or outside or steadingly on a treadmill.

7. After the first 2-3 days, you can add longer KAATSU Cycles. This is called Cycle 60 (i.e., 60 seconds of pressure on followed by 20 seconds of pressure off). In order to do Cycle 60, go to the KAATSU Training mode and manually input 1 minute (60 seconds) and select an appropriate SKU level (e.g., 250 SKU for 60 seconds).

8. Constantly confirm your CRT (Capillary Refill Time) on the quadriceps above your knees or near your ankles on your calves. Make sure your CRT remains faster than 3 seconds. Your feet and legs should be pink or even a beefy red color. There should be significant blood pooling in your legs with your veins distended, particularly visible in your feet.
o Note 1: Never occlude blood flow to your legs.
o Note 2: Never feel numbness while doing KAATSU or allow your feets or legs to turn white, gray or blue. In these cases, immediately release the pressure and take off the KAATSU Air Bands.

9. Remove the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs and rehydrate.

Before Bed Arm Protocols
1. Manually tighten your KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to the appropriate Base SKU (pressure).

2. Inflate the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms to your personalized Optimal SKU.

3. Start with a conservative (i.e., low) SKU on the first KAATSU Cycle. Then proceed with higher and higher SKU levels on the next several subsequent KAATSU Cycles. For example, do 100 SKU for the first KAATSU Cycle, then 150 SKU on the second KAATSU Cycle, then 200 SKU on the third KAATSU Cycle, etc.
o Note: Even if the first or second KAATSU Cycles do not feel tight enough, it is perfectly acceptable to start at a low SKU pressure. This will help warm-up your capillaries and prepare them for higher and more effective SKU levels.

4. During these evening KAATSU Cycles, you can do standard physical therapy movements or the KAATSU Insomnia Protocols that includes:
o Forward shoulder rolls
o Backward shoulder rolls
o Head rotations
o Deltoid and triceps stretching
o Note: Movements before bedtime should be casual and light. Nothing too vigorous and difficult.

5. If you wish to maintain your stamina and strength during your rehabilitation period, do comfortable KAATSU Walking or KAATSU Power Walking on a treadmill or outside for 15-20 minutes with the inflated KAATSU Air Bands on your legs (doing repeated KAATSU Cycles). Alternatively, you can also do KAATSU Aqua in a pool.

Do’s
›› Correctly place the KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms and upper legs every time.
o Note : On your arms, the Bands should be placed above your biceps and triceps near your armpit, but below your deltoids.

›› Check Base SKU (pressure) and find Optimal SKU (pressure) during every KAATSU session. Optimal Pressure is one that is not so high as to occlude, but high enough to get that “KAATSU Fatigue/Failure Feeling” during exercise.
o Note: Your Optimal SKU can change on a daily basis.

›› Release the KAATSU Air Bands if you feel something is not right. If you feel lightheaded or if you have any pain on one side or the other, stop and continue on another day.

›› You can do different exercises or movements during KAATSU. You can type emails or play the piano or play computer games. Be creative and enjoy the experience.

›› Rest 30-60 seconds between different sets of exercises.

›› Do hydrate well before, during and after each KAATSU session.

Don’ts
›› Do not ever fully occlude blood flow. Signs of this are collapsed veins, no pulse at the wrist, pale palms and skin, severely delayed (>6 seconds) capillary refill.

›› Do not have Air Bands inflated for more than 20 minutes on your limbs. The KAATSU Nano will deflate automatically the KAATSU Air Bands when the maximum time is reached.

›› Do not lift heavy weights when doing KAATSU

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Multiple Effects Of Growth Hormone In The Human Body



In the study Multiple Effects of Growth Hormone in the Body: Is it Really the Hormone for Growth?, published in 2016 in the journal of Clinical Medical: Endocrinol Diabetes, authors Jesús Devesa, Cristina Almengló, and Pablo Devesa, they point out that "a number of actions of Growth Hormone exerted on multiple tissues and organs [go] far beyond the classic effects of the hormone on the intermediate metabolism and growth. The high diversity of actions of Growth Hormone can be explained only by the fact that the hormone plays many different roles by activating a high number of proteins involved in cell signaling and displaying different mechanisms of action.

The possibility exists that, rather than a hormone, GH is a prohormone that depending on the tissue may be proteolytically cleaved giving origin to different and shorter GH derivatives with tissue-specific properties. In addition, GH may activate the proliferation of tissue-specific stem cells that then would act in tissue repair after an injury.

Moreover, recently, it has been reported that GH is able to induce the rescue of pancreatic β-cell and function in streptozotocin-treated mice and, therefore, may be of interest in the treatment of type 1 diabetes
."

In their paper, Devesa, Almengló and Devesa explain further, "GH may facilitate the proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration of new neurons in response to brain injury. However, to date, only few studies in human beings explore such a possibility. While these studies indicate a positive effect for GH treatment together with specific neurorehabilitation, both in children with cerebral palsy and in Traumatic Brain Injury patients, or in a patient suffering from a neurogenic dysphagia after oncological brain surgery, all patients in these studies had Growth hormone deficiency most likely occurring as a consequence of their brain damage.

However, we recently demonstrated that GH administration, together with specific rehabilitation, after an important brain injury, is able to recover laboratory animals and patients without Growth hormone deficiency. Similar results have been obtained after a stroke. In rats, delayed and chronic treatment of stroke with central GH may accelerate some aspects of functional recovery and improve spatial memory in the long term, and a pilot study in human patients who suffered a stroke showed improvements after administering GH.

In line with these, the expression of both GH and GHR is strongly upregulated after brain injury and specifically associated with stressed neurons and glia. From these and other studies, it is now clear that GH plays a key role in both physiologic and reparative neurogenesis, being its effect specially marked on cognitive functions, most likely throughout the interaction of the hormone with GHRs expressed in the hippocampus and frontal cortex, brain areas especially related to memory and cognition, respectively.

It is already well known that GHD adults have impaired psychological well-being, including energy, motivation, emotion, memory, and cognition. However, all these abnormalities improved during GH replacement therapy, which leads to marked improvements in the quality of life. The same occurs in GHD after being treated with GH. Attention, perception, and cognitive capacity improve in them. Cognitive impairments and mood disturbances are common findings in patients with GH deficiency. GH treatment significantly improves memory and cognitive functions in these patients, as shown by functional MRI studies. Similar results have been obtained recently by us and others, both in adult GHD patients and in patients with normal GH secretion
."

Many KAATSU Master Specialists have found significant beneficial outcomes have been seen on their patients and clients with Traumatic Brain Injuries [see here] and others experiencing depression or dementia [see here].

As Dr. Sato, the inventor of KAATSU, explains, "GH is said to have psychological effects including the stabilization of emotion. This helps to improve depression and dementia [see video above of a 104-year-old who recovered from dementia with KAATSU].

It is known that GH has positive psychological effects including increasing energy and stabilizing emotion. Secretion of a large amount of GH with KAATSU is believed to work directly on symptoms of depression or dementia including improving a lack of motivation and social withdrawal.

In addition, some say that obesity and depression have a relationship; it is thought that lower physical activity leads to obesity, which exacerbates depression.

KAATSU compensates a lack of exercise and helps to release GH in large amounts resulting in improvement of symptoms
."

KAATSU Master Specialists have seen KAATSU users have increased energy levels and increased stability of the autonomic nerve system which is one factor in improving their emotional stability.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Ryan Ballance, A Lifesaver







































Courtesy of Mayor Bob Whalen, Laguna Beach, California.

Ryan Ballance [standing on the right] is a retired fireman and an experienced waterman originally from Long Beach, California. He is a regular KAATSU Nano user on dryland and uses KAATSU Aqua Bands in the water.

Throughout 25 years of his stellar firefighting career in Florida, the former All-American water polo player helped numerous people in all kinds of situations.

Upon his retirement on the firefighting force, he moved back to Southern California - and continues to save lives.

He made his second lifesaving rescue in less than a year. His first save was with a cardiac arrest victim on the shores of Laguna Beach. His latest safe was in the city's swimming pool with another cardiac emergency.

The City of Laguna Beach honored Ballance with a proclamation:

Whereas, On February 25, 2019, Ryan Ballance successfully rescued a drowning swimmer at the High School and Community Pool; and

Whereas, Ballance is a Pool Lifeguard for the City of Laguna Beach, bound by a duty to act while carrying out his job responsibilities; and

Whereas, The Community Services department prides itself on its tradition of providing exceptional service to its residents; and

Whereas, Ballance responded quickly and professionally, and displayed a high degree of skill and expertise in his life-saving actions; and

Whereas, The swimmer made a full recovery with no lasting heart or brain damage thanks to Ballance's efforts.

Now, therefore, The City Council of the City of Laguna Beach, congratulates and recognizes, on behalf of the entire community, Ballance's excellent work and successful rescue and resuscitation...congratulations!


Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Joe Gomes, A First Move, An Early Adopter, A Visionary

Joe Gomes is the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC) high performance director responsible for the development of staff and systems that evaluates, educates and prepares elite athletes or warfighters to perform at their best when it matters most.

Prior to joining the IHMC, the London native spent 3 years as the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. While at the Raiders, he purchased KAATSU Masters and KAATSU Nanos and requested extra large KAATSU Air Bands for his oversized athletes.

He oversaw sport science, nutrition, strength & conditioning, player reconditioning and performance analytics, and was instrumental in the design, planning and opening of its new Performance Center near the Oakland Airport. His efforts helped the Raiders increase the number of their victories and boosted them to their first playoff appearance in 14 years.

Prior to the Oakland Raiders, Gomes was a Senior Advisor and Performance Director to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) where he oversaw aspects of programming and monitoring for USASOC as well as research and innovation for human performance initiatives.

The former rugby player and track athlete served as the Director of Performance for EXOS for 9 years where he ran the preparation program for the annual NFL Scouting Combine for 4 years. He trained 35 first-round draft picks, 13 top-10 players and four first-overall picks.

As a consultant, his clients include all branches of U.S. Military Special Operations, the U.S. Secret Service, and numerous sporting federations and professional teams across a number of sports.

To listen to Joe Gomes discuss a wide variety of topics, listen here.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global