Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Dr. Cory On Jumping Rope With KAATSU - Legs



Cory Keirn DPT explains and showcases how the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and the KAATSU Air Bands can be used for aerobic purposes.

"...simple and easy...use your speed triangle...no jump rope, no problem."
"...my calves are catching their breath...just do some light hopping..."
"...keep moving and pumping those calves...let's do some single-leg stuff..."
"This is a great way to get a great workout in little time."

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On Jumping Rope With KAATSU - Arms



Cory Keirn DPT explains and showcases how the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and the KAATSU Air Bands can be used for aerobic purposes.

"I don't have a jumping rope, but I got my KAATSU..."
"All that I am really doing is just pumping my calves..."
"...shift, shift...swivel, swivel, tap, tap...getting a little lateral movement in there...I got my arms pumping...stick with me..."

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU At Home - Zoom Meeting On April 1st































Retired Navy SEAL Captain John Doolittle and Steven Munatones will co-host the inaugural KAATSU At Home - Zoom Meeting on Wednesday, April 1st at 10 am California time, 1:00 pm New York time, 6:00 pm GMT, and 2:00 am (Thursday) Tokyo time. It is a one-hour online meeting on the Zoom platform.

Doolittle and Munatones will briefly introduce the following topics during the first 30 minutes:

1. New products: KAATSU Master 2.0 and KAATSU Cycle 2.0
2. How and when to use the KAATSU Master 2.0 and KAATSU Cycle 2.0
3. Uses for KAATSU by aging Baby Boomers during the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns, quarantines and shelter-in-place ordinances
4. Uses for KAATSU by competitive athletes during these trying times
5. Uses for KAATSU by working adults while at home

Doolittle and Munatones will answer questions and address any issues over the last 30 minutes. Participants can ask questions live to the co-hosts on the Zoom remote conferencing platform. If you do not have an opportunity to listen in live, the program will be recorded and archived for your listening pleasure.

Participants can also ask question live to the guests on the Zoom remote conferencing platform.

To login and listen to the KAATSU At Home - Zoom Meeting, join here (https://us04web.zoom.us/j/2827965029). Meeting ID: 282-796-5029 or dial +1-646-558-8656 (New York). To find your local number, visit https://us04web.zoom.us/u/fbYxwZ8Lmh.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Monday, March 30, 2020

Dr. Cory on KAATSU Aqua Arms in Deep Water



Cory Keirn DPT demonstrates different KAATSU Aqua arms exercises in a home pool.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Aqua Arms



Cory Keirn DPT demonstrates various kinds of upper body and core exercises with KAATSU Air Bands inflated by the KAATSU Cycle 2.0.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory on KAATSU Aqua Legs in Deep Water



Cory Keirn DPT demonstrates using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and the KAATSU Aqua Bands for an at-home workout.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory on KAATSU Aqua with a Noodle



Cory Keirn DPT demonstrates how to use inflated KAATSU Air Bands with a Noodle in a swimming pool as a form of innovative aqua therapy.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory Doing KAATSU Aqua



Cory Keirn DPT demonstrates using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and the KAATSU Aqua Bands for an at-home workout.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Dr. Cory Using The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 For Lower Body Warm-up



Cory Keirn DPT explains how the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 can be used for a lower body warm-up.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

The History, Mechanism And Relevance Of KAATSU





The All Nippon Airways (ANA) documentary on Dr. Yoshiaki Sato and the NHK Medical Frontiers documentary on muscle atrophy, both remain especially relevant in these trying times of self-isolation, quarantines, lockdowns and shelter-in-place ordinances.

KAATSU and the mechanisms why it is so effective and efficient have a long history.

The Moment of Discovery

In the fall of 1966, Yoshiaki Sato was 18 years old. He was attending a Buddhist memorial service and listening to the monk chanting sutras when, not unexpectedly, his legs went numb while sitting on the floor in the traditional Japanese position (“seiza” or 正座). With a straight back while kneeling on the tatami mat floor, he started to massage his calves in order to relieve the pain as his legs were bent underneath him.

While the discomfort continued during the long ceremony, he had a revelation.

Sato realized that his blood circulation was blocked in his calves as the weight of his body was directly upon his ankles. He reasoned that his legs must have gone to sleep as a result of the reduced blood flow to the periphery of his legs. Because his calves had the “pumped up” feeling after he experienced while bodybuilding, this was the initial KAATSU moment of inspiration where the original idea of blood flow moderation training began.

The swelling and hardness in his calves led to Sato asking himself the key question that began KAATSU.

I wonder if purposefully constricting blood flow could artificially replicate the physiological conditions of hard training. If this were true, could benefits be realized by only lifting no loads or only light loads instead of heavy weights?

The answer would be answered in the positive.

Years of Quiet Experimentation

Over the next seven years between 1966 and 1973 in the quiet of his own house, the young man from Tokyo diligently experimented on himself by applying different bicycle tubes, ropes and bands at different pressures on different parts of his body. He methodically kept track of what type of bands and pressures worked and what experiments did not.

As a monk in his local Buddhist temple, he began to see results that could not be explained given the physiological knowledge of the day. But the resulting effects of KAATSU were clear, although the medical explanations did not come for another decade.

After detailed and documented trial and error, Sato gradually developed effective protocols to safely restrict blood flow and enable muscle growth. His self-research on his own body led him to determine what length and width of bands are ideal and the optimal degree and locations to apply KAATSU pressure in various activities.

Moment of Proof

By 1973 on his own body, Sato gradually developed the details and fine-tuned the protocols of KAATSU as it continues to be practiced. At the age of 25 he went on a ski trip when he badly fractured his ankle and torn the ligaments around his knee. The injuries were diagnosed and his own father, a local doctor, told Sato that it would take six months to heal.

With a plaster cast on his leg, Sato rehabilitated himself with his KAATSU bands applied to his upper leg. Because he could not withstand the discomfort of keeping the bands on for the usual duration, he released the bands and repeatedly tightened the bands while doing isometric exercises for 30 seconds on and a few seconds off three times per day.

The results of his regimen – now known as the KAATSU Cycle – surprised him to a certain extent, but really shocked his doctors because not only did his muscles not atrophy, but he fully recovered within six weeks.

Years of Confirmation

Word spread locally of Sato’s unheard of recovery. Demand for his new approach built rapidly around Tokyo, so Sato opened the Sato Sports Plaza in Fuchu where the KAATSU Japan headquarters still exists.

Sato conducted KAATSU on local people of all ages and abilities over the next decade. Injured patients, healthy athletes, older people and younger adults flocked to his office. While applying KAATSU to thousands of clients, Sato learned what worked best for people with various kinds of afflictions and injuries and from all walks of life between 1973 and 1982.

Mind – Body – Spirit Connection

Sato observed that KAATSU enabled the human body to improve and heal itself most effectively and most efficiently than any other therapy or modality.

He also encouraged people to focus mentally on their injured body part while doing KAATSU and observed how the intake of food and water before and after KAATSU also led to positive results. The mind-body-spirit connection was clearly evident.

Patenting KAATSU

In 1994, Sato applied for his first patents in Japan (Patent No. 2670421), U.S.A. (Patent No. 6149618), and Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy with 94206403.0) as he produced and commercialized the first KAATSU Training bands. He worked on injured professional golfers and Japanese Olympians as his reputation grew.

Introduction of the KAATSU Instructor Certification Program

In 1997, Sato introduced the KAATSU Instructor educational program in Japan where his defined protocols were shared with coaches, trainers, physical therapists and physicians throughout Japan. Over 3,000 KAATSU Instructors were certified and hundreds of more experienced KAATSU Special Instructors were licensed. These instructors conducted tens of thousands of KAATSU sessions annually and safely without complications.

Media attention and public acceptance grew in Japan after KAATSU was named one of the collaborative projects of the University of Tokyo Hospital’s 22nd Century Medical and Research Center in 2000.

Sato also began to offer an ischemic circulatory physiology course at the University of Tokyo Hospital and conducted joint development work with the Japan Manned Space Systems Corporation.

KAATSU Research

Beginning in the mid-1990’s, Sato began joint research with Professor Naokata Ishii of the Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, at the University of Tokyo. Other researchers in Japan, including cardiologists Dr. Nakajima and Dr. Morita at the University of Tokyo Hospital, started to explore the benefits of KAATSU and various research results were submitted to peer-review publications.

KAATSU Internationalization

In 2014, KAATSU Global was established in Huntington Beach, California and the Center for KAATSU Research at the Harvard Medical School was started in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Sato and his partners Steven Munatones and Richard Herstone. Thereafter, Olympic coach Chris Morgan, David Tawil, retired Navy SEAL Captain John Doolittle, Ralph Polendo, Dr. Lyle Nalli, Robert Heiduk in Germany, Péter Lakatos in Hungary and many others joined the team and began global expansion throughout North America, South America, Oceania, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

Eventually, KAATSU Global developed the next-generation products that were also sold to and distributed by Dr. Sato in Japan including the latest KAATSU Master 2.0 and KAATSU Cycle 2.0.

KAATSU Future

Future applications and the third generation of KAATSU products are currently being explored in the military, medical, sports performance and corporate wellness markets in the United States with plans for further expansion in Asia, South America, Europe, and Oceania.

While KAATSU has expanded to 47 countries as of 2020, there are also an increasing number of knock-offs and imitators that use KAATSU copyrighted materials and attempt to design products around KAATSU patents as the global market continues to grow.

Summary Timelines

1966: Dr. Sato developed the concept of KAATSU when he was sitting on his heels during a Buddhist ceremony.
1966-1972: Dr. Sato experiments on himself and develops the basic KAATSU methodology through years of trial and error.
1973: Dr. Sato breaks his ankle during skiing and uses KAATSU Cycle to rehabilitate himself quickly.
1973-1982: Dr. Sato begins to offer KAATSU to others.
1983-1994: Dr. Sato continues to improve know-how to apply KAATSU through increasingly wider application to people and basic research.
November 1993: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in Japan (Patent No. 2670421).
June 1994: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in the United States (Patent No. 6149618).
August 1994: Dr. Sato applies for first patent of KAATSU in the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Italy (94306403.0).
1995: KAATSU receives recognition after being used on the Japanese bodybuilding champion Toshio Konuma.
1996-1999: Dr. Sato begins joint research with Professor Naokata Ishii, Department of Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo.
1997: Various research results are released at academic conferences in Japan.
2000: Research results are published in various academic journals.
2001: Research results are announced by the Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine.
September 2001: KAATSU and KAATSU Aqua are tested at Golden West College in California, first time outside of Japan.
2004: Japan KAATSU Training Society is established.
June 2004: The study of KAATSU is initiated in the University of Tokyo Hospital's 22nd Century Medical and Research Center.
June 2004: Research results are published by the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine.
October 2004: KAATSU Training and ischemic circulatory physiology course is established at the University of Tokyo Hospital.
April 2005: Joint development agreement is signed with the Japan Manned Space Systems Corporation.
August 2005: Advanced medical research & development cluster is launched at the University of Tokyo Hospital.
October 2005: KAATSU Master Mini is developed and launched in Japan.
April 2006: The University of Tokyo offers a course in Sport and Exercise Biometrics at its Graduate School of Frontier Science.
August 2006: Joint research begins with JAXA and the University of Tokyo into KAATSU implementation into space.
December 2006: KAATSU Training Research Institute Co., Ltd. is launched.
July 2007: Research on KAATSU begins at Rutgers University, University of Oklahoma, West Point, University of Texas and Indiana University Purdue University.
May 2008: KAATSU Master is launched.
August 2008: American College of Sports Medicine signs co-research project with Dr. Sato.
April 2009: Dr. Sato is appointed as Knight Commander of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.
September 2009: Joint development agreement is signed with Jilin University and the State General Administration of Sports in China.
April 2010: Genetic research starts at the Research Institute of Sports Science of the State General Administration of Sports in China. December 2013: Dr. Sato starts to work with United States Ski & Snowboard Association in Park City, Utah.
February 2014: KAATSU Global, Inc. is established in California by Steven Munatones, Richard Herstone and Dr. Sato.
February 2014: KAATSU is used by American Olympic Nordic combined skiers at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.
September 2014: New KAATSU Master and KAATSU Nano are launched in the United States.
2016: Drs. Sato, Ishii, Nakajima and Abe publishes the book, KAATSU Training: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives, in English.
2016: KAATSU is widely used by Olympic athletes at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2017: KAATSU is used by personnel in the Department of Defense and Special Operations Command in the United States military.
2018: KAATSU is used by athletes in the NFL (National Football League), NBA (National Basketball Association), MLB (Major League Baseball), NHL (National Hockey League), MLS (Major League Soccer) and NCAA Division I, II and III institutions in the United States.
2018: KAATSU is used by personnel in the Israeli Defense Forces.
2018: KAATSU is used by paraplegics and quadriplegics for the first time outside of Japan.
2019: KAATSU is distributed in 47 countries and 50 American states including at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).
June 2019: Robert Heiduk publishes the book, KAATSU – The Pressure Training From Japan – New perspectives in sport, therapy and health promotion, in English and German.
June 2019: Dr. Nakajima and Dr. Sato publishes the book, University of Tokyo Hospital 22nd Century Medical and Research Center KAATSU Training & Ischemic Circulatory Physiology Course Summary from 2004 - 2014, in English.
July 2019: Next-generation KAATSU Master 2.0 is launched in the United States, Europe, and Middle East.
October 2020: Next-generation KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is launched in the United States, Europe, and Middle East.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global, Inc.

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

No Big Pool, No Problem






























Track & field, gymnastics, beach volleyball, triathlon and swimming are among the most popular sports during the Summer Olympics.

Olympic heroes like Michael Phelps, Mark Spitz, Don Schollander and Johnny Weissmuller have long enthralled American swimming fans.

In this era of lockdowns, quarantines and shelter-in-place regulations, most dryland athletes can find alternatives to their temporarily closed training facilities. Runners can run in a park or around their neighborhood while cyclists can ride around on public streets (if not in a complete lockdown).

In contrast, competitive swimmers are in a quandary. Most, if not all, competitive pools are shut down. It is hard to train to be a competitive swimmer - especially an elite one - without a 25-yard or 50-meter pool.

But there are alternatives. Small backyard pools and Jacuzzis present a useful alternative in these trying times, especially with KAATSU equipment and FINIS gear like Agility Paddles, Swim Parachute, and Slide Trainers.

Aerobic Training
Set #1: Forward KAATSU Aqua Walking
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Do 10 sets of 15 seconds of walking at a comfortable place, followed by 30 seconds fast walking or walking-in-place.

Set #2: Backward KAATSU Aqua Walking
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Do 10 sets of 15 seconds of walking backwards at a comfortable place, followed by 30 seconds fast walking backwards or walking-in-place.

Set #3: KAATSU Aqua Lateral Jumps
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Jump off your left leg as far as you can to your right. Then jump off your right leg as far as you can to your left. Do sets of 10 jumps, then rest 15-30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Set #4: KAATSU Aqua Kicking (butterfly + backstroke + breaststroke + freestyle)
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Place hands on the side of pool and kick against the wall.
Kick butterfly hard against the wall for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds.
Turn over on your back and kick backstroke hard against the wall for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds.
Kick breaststroke hard against the wall for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds.
Kick freestyle hard against the wall for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds.



Set #5: KAATSU Aqua Bosu Ball Kicking (butterfly + breaststroke + freestyle)
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Balance on a large Bosu Ball and kick to the other side of the pool. If you fall off, jump back on the Bosu Ball and continue.



Set #5: KAATSU Parachute Swimming
Place a FINIS Slide Trainer or FINIS Swim Parachute or stretch cord or Therabands or surgical tubing around your hips (or ankles) and tie to either a pool ladder or have a coach/friend hold you in place. Swim hard for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds. Repeat 5-10 times.

Strength Training
Set #1: KAATSU Aqua Pulling
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and put on FINIS Agility Paddles or any kind of hand paddles. Stand in place and do 30 triceps extensions. Rest for 20 seconds and repeat 5-10 times.

Set #2: KAATSU Aqua Push Downs
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and hold onto a water polo ball or volleyball. Stand in place and push the ball under the water 10 times. Rest for 20 seconds and repeat 5 times.

Set #3: KAATSU Aqua Core - Arms
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and jump on top of a large Bosu Ball. Try to stay on top of the Bosu Ball as long as possible.

Set #4: KAATSU Aqua Core - Arms
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and jump on top of a large Bosu Ball. Try to stay kick to the other side of the pool and turn around. Repeat 5 times after falling off the Bosu Ball, alternating freestyle and breaststroke kicking.​

Set #5: KAATSU Aqua Core - Legs
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs and jump on top of a large Bosu Ball. Try to stay on top of the Bosu Ball as long as possible.

Set #6: KAATSU Aqua Core - Legs
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs and jump on top of a large Bosu Ball. Try to stay kick to the other side of the pool and turn around. Repeat 5 times after falling off the Bosu Ball, alternating freestyle and breaststroke kicking.

Set #7: KAATSU Aqua Core - Core + Arms
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and place the Bosu Ball on the surface of the pool. Try to climb on top of the Bosu Ball in one smooth move and repeat 5-10 times.



Set #8: KAATSU Aqua Core - Core + Arms
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and hold a water polo ball or volleyball under the water straight under your body with one hand. Swim with the other arm and switch where you get to the other side.



Set #8: KAATSU Aqua Twists
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and hold a medicine (weighted) ball on - or better yet, just under - the surface of the pool. Twist from one side to the other 10-20 times. Rest and repeat 3 times.

Set #9: KAATSU Aqua Push & Pull
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms and hold a medicine (weighted) ball on - or just under - the surface of the pool. Push the ball out from your chest by extending your arms straight, then pull the ball ball back towards your chest 10-20 times. Rest and repeat 3 times.

Speed Training
Set #1: KAATSU Aqua Sprinting
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms. Place head underwater take 25 fast arm strokes as quickly as possible. Rest for 20 seconds and repeat 5-10 times.

Set #2: KAATSU Aqua Breakouts and Turns (if possible)
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Push off the wall of the pool to the other side. Do 10 fast turns and breakouts if the pool is longer enough. Rest for 20 seconds between sets of butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and freestyle turns.

Set #3: KAATSU Aqua Vertical Kicking
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your legs. Lift hands above water and kick in the vertical position for 30 seconds, alternating freestyle, butterfly and breaststroke kick. End the last 5-10 seconds with your arms straight above your head with your hands in the streamlined position. Rest for 20 seconds and repeat 5-10 times.

Stretching
Set #1: KAATSU Aqua Stretching - Arms
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your arms. Stand in place and stretch your triceps, deltoids, pecs, biceps and forearms.

Set #2: KAATSU Aqua Stretching - Legs
Place KAATSU Air Bands on your Legs. Go slightly underwater or stand in place and stretch your quadriceps, hamstrings and calves.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, March 21, 2020

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Hip Flexor Dynamic Stretching



Cory Keirn DPT uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 for tactical stretching that can be done anywhere anytime. KAATSU At Home is effective, efficient, and easy.

In the video, Dr. Keirn demonstrates the following exercises:
Hip Flexor Dynamic Stretch – Leg Bands
1. ½ kneeling with stick
2. Switch sides – ½ kneeling with stick
3. Kneeling reach back quad stretch
4. Child’s pose cat and camel
5. 45 degree groiner
6. Switch – 45 degree groiner
7. 90 degree groiner with upper T opener
8. Switch – 90 degree groiner with upper T opener

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Basic Pushing And Pulling For The Upper Body



Cory Keirn DPT shows basic KAATSU push and pull exercises for the upper body that can be done anywhere anytime. KAATSU At Home is effective, efficient and easy.

Dr. Keirn demonstrates and explains the following Basic Push Pull exercises with Upper Body Bands (15 repetitions of each):

1. Long sitting rows
2. Repeat – long sitting rows
3. Pushups
4. Long sitting row
5. Close grip push-up
6. Standing bicep curls
7. Standing kickbacks
8. Detach into Training mode: (a) Bicep curls, (b) Close grip pushups, and (c) Bicep curls

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On Using KAATSU Cycle 2.0 + TRX Straps for Lower Body and Core



Cory Keirn DPT does a variety of exercises for your legs and core utilizing pneumatic KAATSU leg bands, the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, and TRX Straps at home.

Dr. Keirn demonstrates and explains the following exercises for the Basic TRX Leg and Ab Cycle – Upper bands:

1. TRX bench squats
2. TRX deep squats – wide base
3. Squat – Deep squat with heel raise
4. Still squatting – TRX row and curl
5. Jump squats x 20 repetitions
6. TRX rollout x 15 repetitions
7. Continue TRX rollout
8. Jump rope

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

KAATSU Cycle 2.0 + Spyder 360™ + Vasa SwimErg



The Spyder 360™ was called 'The Swiss Army Knife of Ab Rollers' by the Los Angeles Times. But Dr. Lyle Nalli took the Spyder 360™ one step further with KAATSU.

His workout in Huntington Beach, California started with a KAATSU Power Walk.* Walking around his neighborhood, he did 6 consecutive KAATSU Cycles with his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit. He started with a light pressure of 80 SKU and eventually built up to the maximum of 400 SKU in pressure.

After he walked, he continued a series of 50-meter runs alternatively with 100m recovery walks on the streets near his home.

With the aerobic part of his workout over, Dr. Nalli continued with the standard KAATSU 3-Point Exercises where he did Hand Clenches, Biceps Curls and Triceps Extensions using his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit.



After the KAATSU Power Walk and the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises, Dr. Nalli did several sets of KAATSU Swim on his Vasa SwimErg. He used the KAATSU Training mode on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit, putting the 250 SKU pressure on his pneumatic arm bands.



KAATSU Swim Protocol on the Vasa Trainer
* KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit with pneumatic KAATSU Bands
* Descending distance set: 1 minute on + 1-minute off, 45 seconds on + 45 seconds off, 30 seconds on + 30 seconds off, 15 seconds on + 15 seconds off, 15 seconds on + 15 seconds off
* Middle-distance set: 5 x 30 seconds on + 30 seconds off

Dr. Nalli said, "A KAATSU workout with an experienced KAATSU Master Specialist is also very helpful in order to fine tune the use of the KAATSU equipment. The philosophy of training where KAATSU enables incremental changes in gradual pressure, and therefore, in intensity, is very important. The old-school training of no-pain-no-gain is inferior to this kind of incremental increases in physiological stress - that catalyst ultimately leads to hormonal and metabolite secretion that is one critical end game. I am looking forward to seeing the results when it comes to a competition.

I am still following my regular morning workout, albeit only dryland training. I workout at home on my Vasa SwimErg - and get inspired by world-class athletes like Paralympian Robert Griswold who also trains with his own KAATSU equipment [shown below].

Robert is so strong right now in all his events. When I see him working out so diligently despite having the Paralympics pushed back a year. But he continues to train hard and look forward to winning a handful of gold medals in 2021 at the postponed Tokyo Paralympics. He remains motivated and so do I
."



=========================================
* The U.S. Air Force special operators participated in a research project where the test subjects did 20-minute bouts of treadmill speed of 50 meters per minute.**

Dr. Bill Ursprung at Texas A&M University studied the effects of KAATSU Walking to improve aerobic capacity. Dr. Ursprung evaluated the effects of KAATSU Walking on VO2max, 1.5 mile run times, and muscular size at low training volumes and intensities with airman from the U.S. Air Force 350th Special Operations and Tactics Training Squadron.

The researchers found benefits and changes among the KAATSU users while there was no change in muscle size and dynamic and isometric strength in the control group.

1. Serum growth hormone was elevated after KAATSU Walking with the experimental group, but not with the non-KAATSU control group
2. MRI-measured thigh muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume increased by 4-7%
3. One repetition maximum and maximum isometric strength increased between 8-10%

Furthermore, indicators of muscle damage (creatine kinase and myoglobin) and resting anabolic hormones did not change with both groups. The researchers concluded that KAATSU Walking induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain despite the minimum level of exercise intensity after 3 weeks, and that KAATSU Walking is a useful method for promoting muscle hypertrophy for a wide range of people including the frail and elderly.

After three weeks of lower extremity KAATSU Walking, the test found significant improvements in VO2max, significant decreases in 1.5 mile run time, and significant increases in thigh muscle cross sectional area and the researchers concluded that KAATSU Walking represents a methodology for improving aerobic capacity, endurance and muscular size at low training volumes and intensities.

This conclusion mirrored the applications for KAATSU that many far forward-thinking coaches and trainers have known and used - like Dr. Nalli.

For athletes who are looking for concurrent improvements in strength and endurance, they do not always have to move, run, swim, cycle or row at maximum intensity...if they strategically use KAATSU equipment.

** The Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Training on VO2Max and 1.5 Mile Run Performance by William Ursprung, published in the International Journal of Exercise Science.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Friday, March 20, 2020

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Spinal Rotational Mobility



Cory Keirn DPT shows how KAATSU can be utilized if you want to play golf, tennis, baseball or anything where you have to rotate your body. You can do these exercises anywhere anytime including in the comfort of your own home.

Dr. Keirn demonstrates and explains the following Spinal Rotation Mobility exercises with his Leg Bands:

1. Sidelying windmill
2. Switch – sidelying windmill
3. Rotation pec stick stretch
4. Repeat - Rotation pec stick stretch
5. Supine piriformis stretch
6. Switch – supine piriformis stretch
7. Hammy tugger
8. Switch – hammy tugger

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Yoga Legs



Cory Keirn DPT, using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and KAATSU Air Bands on his legs, shows how KAATSU can be used including doing yoga at the beach.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Shoulder Mobility And Strengthening



Cory Keirn DPT uses the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to show how KAATSU can be used to help improve shoulder mobility and strength in the comfort of your own home.

His Basic Shoulder Mobility exercises with the KAATSU Air Bands on his arms include:

1. Shoulder blade circles with deep breathing
2. Shoulder blade up and downs
3. Shoulder blade forward and back
4. Shoulder blade key turns
5. Shoulder blade depressions
6. Shoulder Taps
7. Child’s pose rock
8. Upper trunk reach through and open

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Dr. Cory On KAATSU Yoga Arms



Cory Keirn DPT, using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 and KAATSU Air Bands on his arms, shows how KAATSU can be used including doing yoga at the beach.

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, March 19, 2020

When Swimmers Cannot Swim During Shelter-in-Place Quarantines



Dr. Lyle Nalli and his masters swimming group in Seal Beach started to miss their early morning workouts because all the pool and fitness gym are closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

With the local pools closed in Southern California, swimmers have no choice but to do dryland workouts in their home in the quarantined shelter-in-place locations.

So they gathered at their normal time (5:30 am) and did circuit training ... with a twist. They used the pneumatic KAATSU Aqua Bands and included sets on Dr. Nalli's Vasa Trainer in his garage.

After warming up with KAATSU Cycles on their arms and legs using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit, the swimmers did 45-60 second sets with the KAATSU Air Bands inflated to 250 SKU.

"The reason why KAATSU on Vasa Trainers is so effective and efficient is because the recruitment of muscle fibers skyrockets with KAATSU Training when the limbs are engorged in blood," explains Steven Munatones, a teammate of Dr. Nalli'. "The Japanese sports scientists and coaches have understood this since before 2000 when a paper titled Effects of resistance exercise combined with moderate vascular occlusion on muscular function in humans was published in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

While the pneumatic bands around the upper arms - or upper legs - appear to be some kind of tourniquet, it is not. There is no occlusion or cutting off with blood as you would expect with a tourniquet or blood pressure cuff. With gentle pressure, the bands serve to allow arterial flow from the torso to the limbs to continue, but the rate of venous return - or the blood return back from the limb to the torso - is modified or slowe
d."


The ultrasound image on left shows the brachial artery and brachial veins at 300 SKU during KAATSU of a 21-year-old collegiate athlete remains unobstructed without occlusion.

One of the findings and subsequent understandings of the benefits of KAATSU is that there is an increase in muscle fiber recruitment that has significant implications for athletes and older people. The moderation of blood circulation and the hypoxia and acidic intramuscular environment during KAATSU also leads to additional motor-unit recruitment.

This increase of muscle fiber recruitment with KAATSU means that Dr. Nalli is effectively training more vigorously than normal, but he can avoid the usual fatigue and muscle soreness than comes with intense sustained exercise because there is no microtrauma in his muscles.



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