Thursday, January 16, 2020

Real Warriors, Weekend Warriors



KAATSU Global's John Doolittle does a lot with the time he has available to him.

But every year, the former Navy SEAL Captain donates his time and talents to help raise money and awareness for the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim, a 5 km bay swim held in Tampa Bay, Florida as a charity fundraiser for the Navy SEAL Foundation.

Not many swimming competitions kick off when Supermen bolt down from the high heavens and parachute down right smack on the starting line. But The Frogman Swim is as unique as its volunteer directors and organizers. And few swims - if any - raise money like the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim does.

Nominated for the 2019 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year [vote here], the swim outdid itself again last weekend. It is on track to raise well over US$725,000 with fewer than 200 swimmers.

This year's overall winner was 1996 and 2000 Olympic gold medalist, mother and still-speedy nearly 40-year-old Brooke Bennett, but the real winners included everyone involved from the Gold Star Families to the Navy SEAL Foundation.

For more event information or to donate, visit www.tampabayfrogman.com

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Relieving Back Pain, Strengthening The Back With KAATSU





















Back pain is one of the most common ailments and complaints people experience, especially as they age, gain weight or become increasingly sedentary.

Back pain comes in myriad forms: muscle ache, shooting/stabbing pain, pain/numbness/tingling radiating down the legs, increasing pain with bending, lifting, standing or walking, or pain that improves with reclining.

Whether the back pain is caused by muscle or ligament strain, bulging or ruptured disks, arthritis, scoliosis, or osteoporosis, KAATSU users often find relief by doing the following movements and protocols using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit and the KAATSU Air Bands:

KAATSU Cycle Arm Warm-up
* Snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper arms and do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.
* You can do simple movements of your arms that can include writing emails and sewing to non-weighted biceps curls and triceps extensions.

KAATSU Cycle Leg Warm-up
* Remove KAATSU Air Bands from your arms and snugly place KAATSU Air Bands on your upper legs.
* Do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles at progressively higher pressures on your legs.
* Start at a low(er) pressure (e.g., GROUP LOW) on your first KAATSU Cycle and then increase your pressure (e.g., GROUP MEDIUM, GROUP HIGH, PRO LOW) on the subsequent Cycles.

* You can do some or all of these simple movements:

** Sit up straight (as possible) in a chair, non-slouched with good posture your feet flat on the floor, shoulders back and torso engaged, looking forward while breathing comfortably.
** Stand up straight (as possible) and pace comfortably back and forth in your room. If you do this is a fitness room or gym, take off your shoes and walk on yoga mats or any other kind of soft, spongy surface.
** Stretch your lower back and legs in any number of ways. One particularly effective stretch is to slightly elevate your toes off the ground and bend forward at your waist, letting your arms hang to your feet. There is no need to strain yourself, just bend over comfortably.
** Do the KAATSU 3-Point Exercises for your Legs (see here including Toe Curls, Toe Raises, Heel Raises, Standing Leg Curls, and Quarter Squats).

** With your feet shoulder width apart, stand comfortably while slightly bending your knees and holding water bottles in both your hands down at your sides. Lean slightly forward at an angle while maintaining a straight back. Do not move your hips while you lift your arms forward as high as possible. Repeat 5-10 times.

Key Points
* Be very well hydrated before and during the KAATSU Cycles.
* The color of your skin on your arms and legs should be a pinker or redder tone than normal while doing KAATSU. This indicates that your blood circulation is improved with the KAATSU Air Bands on.
* Remove immediately if your skin becomes clammy or cold or you feel lightheaded.
* You will quickly feel fatigue, much more quickly than if you did the same exercise without KAATSU Air Bands on your arms.
* Repeat this exercise daily or, if so motivated, twice per day (both in the morning and afternoon or evening).
* Place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on your limbs. Snugly means that you can put one finger between the KAATSU Air Bands and your skin - but not two or three fingers. If you can put two or three fingers between the bands and your skin, the bands should be manually tightened a bit more.
* Your back should gradually feel looser and more flexible. As this feeling improves, you can increase your pressure levels and range of motion - but it should all be done gradually and comfortably.


Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

KAATSU For Shin Splints



























Young military recruits, new triathletes, distance runners or anyone beginning a new fitness program occasionally experience shin splints (medial tibial stress syndrome).

The pain runs along the inner edge of the shinbone (tibia) due to inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and bone tissue around the tibia. While resting, icing, stretching, and over-the-counter pain relievers are the most common treatments, doing KAATSU Cycles are also a faster way to return to a pain-free state and can help prevent shin splints in the first place.

The constant (or increased) pounding on pavement or wherever you are running overworks the muscles, tendons and bone tissue. Tenderness, soreness, swelling and pain occurs. If the intensity or distance continues, the shin splints can progress to a stress reaction or stress fracture.

Prevention
Because shin splints are caused by repetitive stress on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach the muscles to the bone, it is critical to strengthen these muscles, tendons, and bone tissue.

Athletes can start doing repeated KAATSU Cycles using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 (or KAATSU Wearables in the future) while walking (i.e., KAATSU Walking). It is recommended to place the KAATSU Air Bands snugly on the upper legs (not allowing more than 2 fingers to put placed between the KAATSU Air Bands and the skin) and then do the first KAATSU Cycle on the GROUP LOW level while walking comfortably. This first cycle runs for 4 minutes.

When the first cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the GROUP MEDIUM level while walking comfortably. After 4 minutes, this second cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the GROUP HIGH level. At this point, the athlete can begin a slow jog or do faster (power) walking.

After the third cycle is completed, then increase the pressure to the PRO LOW level while walking fast or jogging slowly. After 4 minutes, this cycle is completed and the pressure can be increased to the PRO MEDIUM level on the fifth cycle while jogging or walking as quickly as possible (depending on one's stamina).

For the last and sixth cycle, the pressure is increased to the PRO HIGH level.

Recovery
If you are already experiencing shin splints, you should do 3-5 KAATSU Cycles both before and after running. This can be in combination with icing, stretching and taking over-the-counter pain relievers.

Many athletes also find great relief in doing another set of 3-5 KAATSU Cycles less than an hour before going to bed at night.

Others also find additional relief in doing a set of 3-5 KAATSU Cycles on their arms while doing repeated Hand Clenches, Biceps Curls and Triceps Extensions (i.e., KAATSU 3-Point Arm Exercises).

Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, January 4, 2020

KAATSU Skin Care: Using KAATSU Before And After Getting A Tattoo






























Tattoo on arm after 3½ hours.






























Tattoo on arm after 5 hours.

KAATSU Cycles, properly applied, has always been good for pre-surgery preparations and post-surgery recovery, especially with sutures on the skin [see here and below].

Dave Carlson, a renowned water polo coach in Los Alamitos, California and a regular user of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, came up with the KAATSU tattoo protocol (the "Carlson Protocol").

Carlson has several tattoos and he understands very well the inflammation and pain that comes with a new tattoo.

But one hour before his most recent tattoo session, he used his KAATSU Cycle 2.0 to do 3 progressive KAATSU Cycles on his legs followed by 4 progressive KAATSU Cycles on his arms. He had the tattoo above inked on his arm.

Then he did 3 KAATSU Cycles (Low, Medium, High) after the session was over. Then he went to his local gym and worked out with 3 additional KAATSU Cycles on Group Low (the lowest setting possible on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0).

He then took off the bandage 1½ hours after he got his new tattoo, washed with soap and water, and applied Aquaphor. To his surprise, he then took the photo above 3½ hours after the tattoo session was over.

He explained his impressions, "What is unusual is that there was very little or no swelling, my skin is not sensitive to the touch, and my skin under and near the tattoo is not sure or inflamed. My skin is normally sensitive and hurts to touch after I get a tattoo. The area around the tattoo normally rises for a few days after I get it. But with the KAATSU Cycle protocol, this is the least amount of swelling and pain that I have ever had after removing the bandage.

I mean, there is ZERO swelling. It looks like someone drew a picture with ink on my arm. My tattoo is usually puffy and the skin around it is red. But there is no inflammation - and ZERO pain.

Zero swelling and zero pain. I am not exaggerating when I say zero pain
."

The photo on left was taken 6½ hours after the tattoo session. Carlson's arm is engorged in blood in the middle of the 4th KAATSU Cycle. His first KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Low level (with 250 maximum SKU); the second KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro Medium level (with 350 maximum SKU), the third KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU), and the fourth KAATSU Cycle was done at Pro High level (with 400 maximum SKU).

KAATSU inventor Dr. Yoshiaki Sato explained the mechanism behind this phenomenon that KAATSU users can experience. "We have found that KAATSU leads to a decrease in CRP, C-reactive protein which is a blood test marker for inflammation in the body. CRP levels increase in response to inflammation.

This is why people who have arthritis or are experiencing different kinds of pain report feeling relief after bouts of KAATSU.

While there is also an increase in HGH (Human Growth Hormone), nitric oxide, IGF-1 (insulin growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), KAATSU also has shown to decrease CRP.

Typically with pain comes inflammation and the CRP increases. But with KAATSU, the decrease in CRP and production of EPC (endothelial progenitor cell) help. EPC are cells that help regenerate the endothelial lining of your blood vessels
."

Repeated KAATSU Cycles has repeatedly shown to enhance the body's natural healing process, especially when the skin is cut, torn, broken or inked.

These five periodically taken photographs show the rapid recovery of the sutures and skin on a 49-year-old patient who had total knee replacement surgery at a VA facility in Florida.

The patient repeated KAATSU Cycles (8 cycles of 30 seconds of pressure on followed by 5 seconds of pressure off in the Group Low, Group Medium, Group High, Pro Low, Pro Medium, and Pro High modes, done sequentially) on his KAATSU Cycle 2.0. He did his series of KAATSU Cycles in the morning and again in the evenings as he comprehensively integrated KAATSU to his regularly scheduled physical therapy.

"One thing that we have seen time and time again is how quickly the skin and wound heals," says Steven Munatones. "The skin around the wound can heal so quickly with repeated KAATSU Cycles that the skin grows over the sutures - much faster than what is normally expected by physicians.

This can cause an unanticipated post-surgical issue if the skin grows over the sutures. When physicians schedule the normal removal of the sutures, patients utilizing regular KAATSU Cycles will often experience faster than normal healing of wounds and incisions. So, a patient should inform their attending physician of this phenomenon
."

























































































Copyright © 2014 - 2020 by KAATSU Global

Saturday, December 28, 2019

KAATSU Utilization To Maximize Army Combat Fitness Test Scores

















































Photos and videos courtesy of U.S. Army.

The United States military is overhauling its current fitness requirements for its soldiers. The current PT (physical training) test was established in the early 1980s and consists of 2 minutes of push-ups, 2 minutes of sit-ups, and a 2-mile run.

But there are two major problems that must be addressed: (1) more than 50% of American soldiers are injured each year, and (2) new recruits are in much less-than-optimal physical shape. Without formal exercise background or prior rigorous training, many recruits are injured during their boot camps. Running with boots, running for distance, and the typical early morning to evening physical grind is simply too much for many young individuals who grew up with the Internet, indoor entertainment, and reduced Physical Education classes in junior and senior high schools.

In response to these societal trends and modern-day lifestyles, the US military will change its physical training requirements. Personnel must take an initial physical training exam and then every six months after the first test. The exam measures agility, explosive power and upper- and lower-body strength - parameters that can be ideally optimized with KAATSU Cycle and KAATSU Training.

The purpose of the new ACFT (Army Combat Fitness Test) starting in October 2020 includes:

1. Improve soldier and unit readiness
2. Transform the Army's fitness culture
3. Reduce preventable injuries and attrition
4. Enhance mental toughness and stamina

The ACFT exam includes the following exercises:

Deadlift: lift the heaviest weight possible three times
Maximum (100 points) - 340 pounds
Pass (70 points) - 180 pounds

Power Throw: throw a 10 lb. medicine ball over your head and behind you
Maximum (100 points) - 13.5 yards
Pass (70 points) - 8.5 yards

Hand-Release Push-Ups: do as many as possible in 2 minutes
Maximum (100 points) - 70
Pass (70 points) - 30

Sprint-Drag-Carry: sprint 50 meters + drag 90 lbs. 50 meters + side-shuffle 50 meters + farmer's-carry 80 lbs. 50 meters + sprint 50 meters
Maximum (100 points) - 1 minute 40 seconds
Pass (70 points) - 2 minutes 9 seconds

Pull-Up Leg Tucks: hang from a pull-up bar and host yourself until your arms are at 90° while bringing your knees to your chest, then lower your legs as many as possible
Maximum (100 points) - 20
Pass (70 points) - 5

Two-Mile Run: run as quickly as possible
Maximum (100 points) - 12 minutes 45 seconds
Pass (70 points) - 18 minutes

In order to reach one's potential and score the maximum points on the ACFT exam, KAATSU Global recommends the following KAATSU program:

For Heaviest Deadlift Amount
12-15 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training to reach heaviest potential amount:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on arms as warm-up: stretch throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on arms: 20-40 deadlifts with bar (no plates, good technique) + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on arms: 10-20 deadlifts with bar (no plates, good technique) + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on arms: 5-10 deadlifts with bar (no plates, good technique) + rest 20 seconds
5. 4th KAATSU Training set on arms: 1-3 deadlifts with bar (no plates, good technique) + rest 60 seconds while switching from arm to leg bands

6. 2 KAATSU Cycles on legs as warm-up: walking + walking lunges throughout Cycles
7. 1st KAATSU Training set on legs: 20-40 assistive sumo lifts with lightweight kettlebell or dumbbell + rest 20 seconds
8. 2nd KAATSU Training set on legs: 10-20 assistive sumo lifts with lightweight kettlebell or dumbbell + rest 20 seconds
9. 3rd KAATSU Training set on legs: 5-10 assistive sumo lifts with lightweight kettlebell or dumbbell + rest 20 seconds
10. 4th KAATSU Training set on legs: 1-3 assistive sumo lifts with lightweight kettlebell or dumbbell + rest 20 seconds



For Maximum Power Throw
Exercise #1: 10-12 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for maximum potential distance:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on arms as warm-up: 3-Point Exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions) throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on arms: 10 Overhead Push Press with lightweight kettlebells + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on arms: 5-8 Power Jumps + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on arms: 1-3 Power Jumps + rest 60 seconds



Exercise #2: 10-12 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for maximum potential distance:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on legs as warm-up: walking + walking lunges throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on legs: 10 Power Jumps + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on legs: 5-8 Power Jumps + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on legs: 1-3 Power Jumps + rest 60 seconds



For Maximum Hand-Release Push-Ups Exercise #1: 10-12 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for maximum potential number:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on arms as warm-up: 3-Point Exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions) throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on arms: 10-15 Supine Chest Press with lightweight kettlebells + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on arms: 5-8 Power Jumps + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on arms: 1-3 Power Jumps + rest 60 seconds



Exercise #2: 10-12 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for maximum potential number:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on arms as warm-up: 3-Point Exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions) throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on arms: 8-12 Eight Count T Push-up + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on arms: 4-8 Eight Count T Push-up + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on arms: 1-3 Eight Count T Push-up + rest 60 seconds



For Fastest Sprint-Drag-Carry Exercise #1: 10-12 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for fastest potential speed:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on arms as warm-up: 3-Point Exercises (Hand Clenches + Biceps Curls + Triceps Extensions) throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on arms: 10-15 Straight Leg Deadlift with lightweight kettlebells + rest 20 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on arms: 5-8 Straight Leg Deadlift with lightweight kettlebells + rest 20 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on arms: 1-3 Straight Leg Deadlift with lightweight kettlebells + rest 60 seconds



Exercise #2: 4-8 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for fastest potential speed:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on legs as warm-up: walking + slow jog throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on legs: 1 easy-pace Shuttle Sprint + rest 60 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on legs: 1 medium-pace Shuttle Sprint + rest 60 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on legs: 1 fast-pace Shuttle Sprint + rest 60 seconds



For Maximum Number of Leg Tucks
3-5 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for maximum potential number:
1. 1st KAATSU Training set on legs: 20-30 Horizontal Leg Tucks - lay down and bring knees to chest without touching feet to ground + rest 20 seconds
2. 2nd KAATSU Training set on legs: 10-20 Horizontal Leg Tucks - lay down and bring knees to chest without touching feet to ground + rest 20 seconds
3. 3rd KAATSU Training set on legs: 5-10 Horizontal Leg Tucks - lay down and bring knees to chest without touching feet to ground + rest 20 seconds

For Fastest 2-mile Run Speed
5-10 minute set of KAATSU Cycle + KAATSU Training for fastest 2-mile Run Speed:
1. 2 KAATSU Cycles on legs as warm-up: walking + slow jog throughout Cycles
2. 1st KAATSU Training set on legs: 400-800m run at 2-mile goal pace + rest 120 seconds
3. 2nd KAATSU Training set on legs: 400-800m run at 2-mile goal pace + rest 120 seconds
4. 3rd KAATSU Training set on legs: 400-800m run at 2-mile goal pace + rest 120 seconds
Note: As stamina gradually increases, slightly increase the pressure levels while running at 2-mile goal pace. For example, if the goal pace is 14 minutes for 2 miles, then the 800m pace should be run in 3 minutes 30 seconds.

General Notes:
1. On KAATSU Cycles, start with Group pressure level on 1st Cycle and finish with Pro pressure level on 2nd Cycle
2. Be very well hydrated
3. Always air to have a fast CRT (Capillary Refill Time)
4. Always start with conservative (low) pressures, especially on legs
5. If a recruit has 'White Coat Syndrome', do not place KAATSU Air Bands on the recruit's arms

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

KAATSU For Torn Or Strained Biceps
























































Athletes, military personnel, public safety officers, and weekend warriors occasionally experience torn or strained biceps. KAATSU can significantly and quickly help these types of injuries.

They feel a sudden burst of pain in the upper arm near the shoulder and sometimes hear a “popping” sound as the tendon tears. The injured individual also can experience weakness in their shoulder, a bruising on their upper arm, a significantly reduced inability to move or rotate their arm, a change in the appearance of the bicep (like it is "popped out"), or muscle spasms.

The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is the easiest and most convenient equipment to use and help the muscle repair itself while experiencing no muscle atrophy or long-term loss of strength.

Before using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, be well-hydrated before starting. Ideally, you should frequently sip small amounts of fluid 30 minutes before you start and have clear urine to be properly hydrated - as opposed to guzzling down water in large amounts just before starting.

Always follow the standard KAATSU protocols (i.e., always have good capillary refill within 2 – 3 seconds with no occlusion and no numbness).

The standard KAATSU guidelines are as follows:

* If the injured muscle, arm or shoulder hurts significantly, do not do KAATSU on the injured side; only do KAATSU on the other three limbs.
* If the injured side can withstand the pressure of KAATSU Arm Bands without pain, then apply KAATSU Air Bands only on the injured limb.
* Always start with - and only do = the KAATSU Cycle (i.e., 8 cycles of 30 seconds of increasing pressure + 5 seconds of no pressure on the KAATSU Cycle 2.0)
* Never continue KAATSU on the injured arm if there is any pain or numbness on that arm.

The standard recommended KAATSU protocol is as follows:

* Do 1-3 KAATSU sessions daily (e.g., morning, mid-afternoon and/or evening) - both on the arm and both legs.
* Do 3-6 KAATSU Cycles per session.

* On the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, start each KAATSU session with arm in the GROUP mode / LOW level. Either sit comfortably, stretch, or do rehabilitation movements (as recommended by your physical therapist) with the KAATSU Arm Band.
* Continue with the GROUP LOW level if appropriate on the second cycle. But increase the pressure - if possible - to the GROUP mode / MEDIUM level.
* Continue with the GROUP MEDIUM level if appropriate on the third cycle. But increase the pressure - if possible - in the GROUP mode / HIGH level.
* Continue with the GROUP HIGH level if appropriate on the fourth cycle. But increase the pressure - if possible - in the PRO mode / LOW level.
* Continue with the PRO LOW level if appropriate on the fifth cycle. But increase the pressure - if possible= in the PRO mode / MEDIUM level.

* Continue with the PRO MEDIUM level if appropriate on the sixth cycle. But increase the pressure - if possible= in the PRO mode / HIGH level.
* Always adjust the levels as appropriate for your own body.
* While you are doing the KAATSU Cycles, you can also do standard physical therapy exercises:

** Avoid overhead lifting or exercises while you are healing.
** Gently bring the palm of the hand on your injured side up toward your shoulder, bending your elbow as much as you can. Then straighten your elbow as far as you can. Repeat.
** Raise your injured arm out to your side and place the thumb side of your hand against a wall with your palm down. Keep your arm straight. Rotate your body in the opposite direction of your raised arm until you feel a stretch in your biceps. Hold and repeat.
** Stand and hold a water bottle in your hand. Bend your elbow and bring your hand with your palm up toward your shoulder. Hold and slowly straighten your arm and return to your starting position.
** Stand with your injured arm hanging down at your side. Keep your arm straight, bring your arm forward and move towards the ceiling. Hold and repeat.

* Repeat this same process with your legs. You can either sit comfortably, stretch, or walk (easily or vigorously) with the KAATSU Leg Bands while doing the KAATSU Cycles.​ KAATSU's effects are systemic so you will also benefit from KAATSU Walking or any KAATSU exercise on your lower body.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

Friday, December 20, 2019

Global Travels With The KAATSU Cycle 2.0






































A flight from Los Angeles to Tokyo - and back - on the same day can be tough.

"It happens rarely, but when such a tough intercontinental business trip becomes a necessity, there is a clever and convenient biohack.

Functioning normally and recovering well from such a quick transpacific business trip turnaround is doable and reasonable when accompanied with proper hydration and the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit throughout the period of travel
," said Steven Munatones. "For example, I take the following schedule on this quick turnaround:

Stage 1: 1-hour drive to LAX from home + 2-hour wait in LAX
Stage 2: 1-hour flight from LAX to San Francisco + SFO transit time
Stage 3: 10-hour flight from SFO to Tokyo arriving at 2:45 pm
Stage 4: A full slate of business meetings in Tokyo until 10 pm
Stage 5: 10-hour flight returning from Tokyo to LAX, departing Tokyo at 12 midnight
Stage 6: Transit through U.S. Customs + 1+ hour drive home

The business trip starts at 4:30 am on my home on Day 1 (e.g., Sunday) and ends around 6:30 pm on Day 2 (e.g., Monday) for a total of 38 non-stop hours of ground and air transportation via car, airplane, monorail, subway, taxi and train combined with several business meetings in different locations throughout Tokyo.

It is important to get a good night's sleep the day before this trip starts. This is best accomplished by doing 3-5 KAATSU Cycles within an hour of going to bed the night before.

During the transpacific flight from California to Tokyo, I do 2 or 3 sessions of KAATSU Cycles on my arms in the economy-class seats. The economy-class seats are too narrow to comfortably use the KAATSU Cycles on my legs because I feel that I am bothering passengers on either side of me while putting on and taking off the bands. If I get upgraded to business class, however, there is plenty of room on the much wider seats to do KAATSU Cycles on my legs without bothering anyone.

I watch movies or work on my laptop while the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit automatically takes me through several KAATSU Cycles. Before each KAATSU session, I make sure that I am very well-hydrated.

These sessions are usually done before the first on-board meal, during mid-flight, and/or after the second on-board meal.

After I land and get through Customs in Tokyo, I feel it is best to take a quick shower at the airport and then set off for a full day of business meetings and meals. During the meetings, I do KAATSU Cycles which helps me get through the day. Admittedly, I get tired towards the evening, but after a KAATSU session, I am reinvigorated. The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 unit is so quiet and unobtrusive that doing KAATSU Cycles during a business meeting presents no interruption to our discussions.

Normal hydration with water throughout the flight is augmented twice with single-serve 10 ml vials during this 10-hour period in Tokyo with ocean minerals by QuintEssential (i.e., QuintEssential 0.9 - Liquid Mineral Replenishment + Hydration Formula). This is key - and my energy does not decrease until the very end of the day, usually after an evening business meal.

But I get through the work portion of the trip without any problems. I do one last KAATSU Cycle in the Tokyo airport before I board the return flight home - and this usually enables me to nap a very solid 2-3 hours.

I may do one more KAATSU session in the airplane as it heads toward landing in LAX - enough to give me that last boost for the car ride home. By the time, I get home 38 hours after I started, I am ready for bed - and can start the next day early as usual without missing a beat or feeling fatigued.

The entire turnaround would have been way, way too physically exhausting without the KAATSU Cycles
."

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Swimming Helped Me Survive, KAATSU Enabled Me To Thrive



























Photo shows Munatones with the pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands on his arms inflated to 100 SKU pressure, doing 25-yard swims at light intensity.

On May 12th 2016, Steven Munatones had a heart attack (i.e., ventricular fibrillation arrest, atypical thrombus, and a myocardial infarction in the left anterior descending artery) at his home.






























After he awoke from the induced coma, Arctic Sun protocol, and a stent implanted in his left artery and was released from Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, California, Munatones wrote in June 2016 [here], "Perhaps, I will never get back to that same previous swimming speed and intensity...it may take me a while – perhaps a long time or perhaps never – to have the requisite self-confidence to swim in the Pacific Ocean or to do a fast main set of freestyle or butterfly in the pool. But those limitations – short-term or long-term – are perfectly acceptable to me."

Dial forward three years as Munatones has been doing KAATSU Cycles nearly every day as the primary form of his cardiac rehabilitation.

"I never thought I would get back to my previous level of fitness," the 57-year-old mentioned. "But I have clearly surpassed it. Swimmers can easily and objectively measure one's level of fitness based on the pace and intervals that we swim in a pool. Just recently, I was able to hold a pace of 1:09-1:12 per 100 yards for fifty consecutive 100-yard freestyle swims in a set described by swimmers as 50x100 @ 1:15 in a 25-yard pool. I was not able to do that before.

I have not changed my diet, dryland training, or amount of swimming that I normally do. However, this test set was a clear and objective measure that my aerobic conditioning has improved as I get older - as long as I continue to do daily KAATSU Cycles
."

Munatones described his heart attack that occurred at his home. "I was at my home, heading to the kitchen for breakfast, and I just collapsed. I do not remember anything for 9 days, but on that morning, my 17-year-old rescued me. He did hands-only CPR while my wife was talking to the 911 operators. The paramedics came, took over, and took me to Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach [California].

I was immediately treated by the emergency room staff, operated on by cardiologist Dr. Lee Carter who put a stent in my LAD (left anterior descending) artery. After telling my wife that I would likely have severe neurological damage, they agreed to apply the Arctic Sun protocol. I spent a few days in a hypothermic induced coma and came up in the Critical Care Unit at the hospital.

I knew it was a miracle that I lived.

Everything - the timing, the location, the 911 operator, my son, the paramedics, the ER staff and cardiologist, and the circumstances - went just right for me to live. It was a perfect storm of how best the emergency medical system works in America. Everyone involved did an outstanding job in an extremely timely manner to enable me to recover from a heart not beating and lungs not moving, and a brain hovering between life and death.

I am forever grateful for my son and his ability to remain calm and composed as I laid out on the verge of death giving CPR, and the immeasurable skills of the paramedics, nurses and doctors who treated me.

Even before being released from the hospital and returning home, I was intent to getting back to normal as soon as possible. I knew my stress levels and heavy travel schedule had to be significantly reduced to return to a more healthful lifestyle. But I also instinctively knew that swimming and KAATSU absolutely had to become a major part of my recovery.

Swimming is what I have done all my life and KAATSU is something that I had studied how to optimally apply to cardiac rehabilitation patients at the University of Tokyo Hospital under the mentorship of cardiologists Drs. Nakajima and Morita, and Dr. Sato, the KAATSU inventor.

Now - on myself at home - was the optimal time to apply what I learned in Tokyo
."

But the learned words of the medical professionals reminded him - and other cardiac patients warned him - about swimming and pushing himself too soon and too hard:

"Take it easy."
"Don't do KAATSU."
"Certainly don't do KAATSU at least for another year."
"Focus on the prescribed cardiac rehab at the hospital."
"Don't get your heart rate too high."
"You need to rest and take it day by day."

Munatones described his dilemma, "I was grateful for the much-appreciated advice of people who had heart attacks and those who treat them as a professional. Since they have the experience and were the medical professionals who saved me, I listened to their advice of course. But I still craved rehabilitating through swimming and KAATSU.

While cardiac rehabilitation traditionally involves pharmaceuticals of various kinds, rest, and walking on treadmills under medical supervision, I wanted to swim and do KAATSU. I wanted to take off my shoes and get in the water; I did not want to put my shoes on and hop on a stationary bike. I wanted to get wet; I did not want to perspire in a rehabilitation clinic. I wanted to swim with my buddies; I did not want to hang around people with cardiac issues.

I also wanted to do KAATSU to augment my swimming; I knew that by carefully and gradually inducing blood pooling in my limbs with the pneumatic KAATSU bands, that would be help me. I had spent years being mentored by Dr. Sato, the KAATSU inventor, and University of Tokyo Hospital cardiologists Drs. Nakajima and Morita on how to use KAATSU with cardiac rehab patients, so I was confident in what they taught me.

But I followed directions of my American doctors and very impatiently waited.

Finally, the day came in June when my wife gave me her permission to swim - and I felt that was also the go-ahead day to start KAATSU Cycles. It feel wonderful - and normal - to wake up before the sun rose and drive to the swimming pool in the dark. I could see the lights shining over the pool deck from a distance, a familiar sight. I knew my swimming buddies would park in the same spaces, walk slowly to the pool, and hop in the same lanes...as they have for decades. I knew the warm-up would be the same and the main set would be varied as usual.



























I was under strict directions to keep my heart rate low and swim cautiously. That was not to be a problem. Especially when I just sat on my couch at home or was typing emails at my desk and doing repeated KAATSU Cycles. I knew the metabolic and hormonal responses as a result of KAATSU would help me recover from my heart attack and stent implant in ways that were unknown in the United States
."



























Munatones described how he utilized swimming as a form of cardiac therapy. "I knew that I can easily control my swimming pace and heart rate by the speed of my kick, my stroke rate (arm turnover), my breathing pattern, the length and intensity of my breakouts, and the length or duration of swimming sets in the pool. For example, if I shifted from a 2-beat kick to a 6-beat kick, my heart rate would increase. If I increased my arm turnover, or if I breathed less frequently, or if I performed longer or faster breakouts, my heart rate would also increase.

So control over my swimming pace and heart rate was easy to manage - and I documented everything.

I wanted definitive information about my heart rate so I downloaded Cardiio, the free mobile app created by the MIT Media Lab, to my iPhone. I placed my iPhone next to the pool so I could easily grab it when I stopped to rest at the poolside. I checked my heart rate throughout the workout, but made notes during the main set when I would swim faster.

I also used the Masimo MightySat™ Fingertip Pulse Oximeter to check my pulse, respiratory rate, and heart rate recovery. All this data was invaluable and objective for how I was to conduct my swimming and KAATSU rehabilitation.
Initially during Week 1, I swam very slowly, barely kicking with a purposefully slow arm turnover. I only did open turns rather than flip turns and I stopped frequently. I kept my swimming distance to 2,000 - 2,500 yards (1828m - 2286m) in a short-course pool and was careful to never get out of breath.

During the first five swimming sessions, I kept my heart rate or beats per minute (bpm) to under 110 bpm [see below]. It felt easy and comfortable, but I really enjoyed just being back in the water with my swimming buddies. I also measured the same using the Masimo device while doing KAATSU Cycles at my home.


When I did the KAATSU Cycles while sitting, I noticed that my pulse rate would actually decrease the more KAATSU Cycles that I did while my oxygen saturation levels (SpO2) would increase. Because the KAATSU Cycles helped increase my vascular elasticity, this inverse relationship between my decreased pulse rate and increased SpO2 made sense."






































Data from Cardiio, taken by Munatones at poolside

Munatones explained his approach in the pool. "I gradually increased my controlled heart rate to a maximum of 130 bpm during Week 2 and increased it yet again to a maximum of 150 bpm during Week 3 - where the maximum will be maintained for the next six months. I checked my swimming pace after a 2-3 50-, 75- or 100-yard swims, depending on our main set. I made sure to document everything so I could show my cardiologist later. Although I was trained by Dr. Sato in Tokyo, I was not completely sure what data would result and what outcomes would occur - but I had 100% confidence that KAATSU and swimming would ultimately be helpful. To check my recovery, I did pace 100-yard swims to check my speed, pulse and heart rate recovery at the end of each swim practice.

As soon as I finished a swim set, I would stand up on the shallow end of the pool and quickly grab my iPhone to check my heart rate with the Cardiio app or Masimo device. After 60 seconds of rest, I checked my heart rate again. I had hoped that the differential between my maximum heart rate and my heart rate after 60 seconds would increase over time. I saved the data and then posted it on an Excel spreadsheet for future analysis.

During Weeks 1-3, I never got out of breath in the pool like I usually did in our main sets previously to my heart attack. Along with Dr. Lyle Nalli racing alongside me, we would push our pace to maximum exertion levels. But no longer. I was taking my aquatic rehabilitation casually and carefully in a controlled manner.

I am convinced that a lifetime of swimming with all its cardiovascular benefits helped me survive...and I thrived with the addition of KAATSU in my own form of cardiac rehab.

In addition to swimming five days per week, six weeks after my heart attack, I was also concurrently doing KAATSU, primarily on my arms, but also on my legs at least three times per week on dryland. I wanted to start KAATSU immediately after waking up from my coma, but others around me (e.g., wife) encouraged me to wait - and my cardiologist definitely did not even want me to start KAATSU.

Three weeks after my heart attack, I started doing easy and conservative KAATSU Cycles with low pressure regularly on my limbs - administered by myself in the comfort of my own home.

I am convinced that the combination of KAATSU and swimming is the ideal form of rehabilitation for my own cardiac issues. KAATSU allowed me to gain weight back (I had lost nearly 30 lbs. in the hospital), gain back my muscular strength and mass while swimming enabled me to maintain flexibility and improve my aerobic conditioning
."

So much so that the 57-year-old heart attack survivor was able to 50x100 @ 1:15 holding a good swimming pace - credit, he strongly believes, to the daily regimen of KAATSU Cycles, a protocol developed by Dr. Sato and his colleagues at the University of Tokyo Hospital years ago.



Three years after his heart attack, Munatones prepared for the 50x100 @ 1:15 set by occasionally doing KAATSU Aqua burpees (1 lap butterfly + pull-ups performed to muscular failure; followed by 2nd lap freestyle; followed by 3rd lap of butterfly + push-ups on deck performed to muscular failure; finishing with 4th lap of freestyle).

CAUTION: It is EXTREMELY important to note that Munatones had the benefit of 16 years of mentorship and guidance by experienced cardiologists in the use of KAATSU in Japan before he used KAATSU on himself as a form of cardiac rehab. Patients must discuss this application with their own cardiologists and receive the approval of their own cardiac rehabilitation therapists before attempting this application on themselves.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Monday, November 25, 2019

Michael Andrew's Race Day Recovery, Everyday Training With KAATSU



19-year-old world-class swimmer Michael Andrew talks about how he uses the original KAATSU Master and the KAATSU Cycle mode for recovery (beginning at 9:59 in the above video).

It is important to note that he - and many other athletes in heavy training or during a competition - use the KAATSU Cycle mode before going to bed or taking a nap. The KAATSU Cycle mode is a repeated inflation and deflation of the KAATSU Air Bands. The pneumatic bands are inflated at subsequently higher and higher pressures so an increasingly amount of blood is engorged in the limbs. This purposefully mechanical process is essential to enable the production of hormones and metabolites.



Andrew talks about how he uses the KAATSU Master and KAATSU Cycle mode (beginning at 2:51 in the above video) to prepare for vigorous training. The repeated cyclical process enables a very gradual engorgement of blood in the limbs so the body becomes very ready for a rigorous workout.

At 6:05 in the above video, he also talks about how he uses the pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands for various aspects of his training - from swimming fast to starts off the blocks.

At 12:59 in the above video, he is looking to reach his race pain threshold - that feeling while he goes all out where the body tells the brain to slow down or stop - and keep going with his inflated KAATSU Air Bands.

Athletes can divide their use of KAATSU in three primary ways:

1. Athletic Performance Improvement
2. Recovery
3. Rehabilitation

Athletic performance improvement can include a focus on speed, strength, stamina, range of motion, or technique. Each goal can require a different level of pressure. For example, aerobic exercise - like running, cycling or swimming - will require a lower pressure than anaerobic exercise. Stamina work dictates a lower pressure than sprint work. Stretching or range of motion exercises and technique work (e.g., sprinting or swimming race starts, baseball or golf swings, basketball or ice hockey shots, wrestling or boxing moves) can depend on the amount of work or ability to handle different pressures.

In the athletic performance realm, KAATSU should only continue until muscular fatigue is reached or proper technique is unable to be sustained. Ideally, that period can be anywhere from 5-12 minutes - and many times, even less time than that. That is, there is no need to continue KAATSU'ing while your body is so fatigued that poor technique is practiced.

Recovery can be repeated KAATSU Cycles after a vigorous workout or a game/performance - or even before going to bed. In these cases, the KAATSU Cycles should start at lower pressures (e.g., Group Low) and then gradually build up on each KAATSU Cycle. This gradual increase in pressure is key. On the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, this means that the athletes start at Group Low (the lowest pressure setting) on the first KAATSU Cycle and then Group Medium, Group High, Pro Low, Pro Medium, and Pro High on subsequent KAATSU Cycles.

If you want to improve your sleep quality, do simple exercises (e.g., forward and backward shoulder rolls, triceps stretching) while doing 2-5 bouts of conservative (i.e., low pressure) KAATSU Cycles.

For rehabilitation from a surgery or a muscle strain, back pain, broken bone or ligament tear, many repeated KAATSU Cycles 2 or even 3 times a day is extraordinarily helpful. This blog has several examples of specific protocols for rehabilitation of these such injuries.

In general, rehabilitation of capillary-poor body parts (e.g., ligaments, tendons) requires higher pressures and more frequent/numerous KAATSU Cycles than capillary-rich body parts (e.g., muscle).

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Twice Daily KAATSU Usage By Bulletproof



Purple Heart recipient Joe Lowrey of Long Beach Wilson High School in Long Beach, California has been using KAATSU daily for nearly two years.

While serving with the 7th Special Forces Group on July 7th 2014, the U.S. Army Green Beret took a bullet to the head in 2014 (read his story here). The injury occurred during Lowrey’s third deployment as he was manning the gun turret on top of a truck during an intense firefight against Taliban insurgents.

After surprising his colleagues and the medical staff in hospitals in Afghanistan and Germany, then later the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C. by surviving the traumatic brain injury, his ability to do simple movements - standing up, walking, using his left arm - was significantly hampered or impossible.

But after two years of twice daily KAATSU Cycles and KAATSU Training (morning and night on both arms and legs), the retired Sergeant 1st Class has improved dramatically, both physically and cognitively.

"I started eating right, going keto, and getting good sleep," says Lowrey. "I use all kinds of biohacks, but I always try to do KAATSU in the morning with my caregiver and before I go to bed at night. I jokingly tell my buddies that Dave Asbrey of Bulletproof took my name. I am the one who is bulletproof."






























U.S. Army Green Beret Sergeant 1st Class Joseph Lowrey prior to his traumatic brain injury.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Friday, November 22, 2019

Improve Muscle Tone, Increase Muscle Size Without Weights




53-year-old Eliot Tawil, 71-year-old Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, female swimmers, and 34-year-old paraplegic Joe Lowrey (see here) demonstrate daily that muscle tone can be improved and muscle size, strength and girth can be increased without weights, using KAATSU.

The key is to move your muscles very slowly while contracting your muscles as much as possible in both the negative and positive directions.s can be done with simple biceps curls, walking on the beach barefooted, or swimming slowly.

But this form of muscle engagement with KAATSU Cycles (repeated intermittent pressure within the pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands) or KAATSU Training (with sustained pressure in the pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands) is most often performed by patients with broken limbs in a cast, people recovering from a surgery, bedridden patients, paraplegics, and those who are otherwise incapable or unmotivated to use weights or even resistance bands.

71-year-old Dr. Yoshiaki Sato has used KAATSU daily for over 50 years.



































Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Slowly But Surely When Using The KAATSU Cycle 2.0



Green Beret and Purple Heart recipient Joe Lowrey finished off his physical therapy session at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Hospital with several KAATSU Cycles on the new KAATSU Cycle 2.0.

Under the guidance of KAATSU Master Specialist David Tawil, Lowrey started out at a very low, conservative pressure (Group Low at 80 SKU on the first repetition of the KAATSU Cycle 2.0) for the first 4 minute 40 second KAATSU Cycle. He continued doing additional KAATSU Cycles, each time increasing the pressures with the six pre-set KAATSU Cycle pressure levels.

Lowrey stepped up the pressure to the Group Medium and High levels on the next two Cycles. Then he gradually increased to higher pressures on the Pro mode (that ranges from 180 to 400 SKU) over the next three Cycles.

The effect was a hormonal and metabolic response that enabled him to reach his maximum flexibility of his left arm and shoulder, and maximum relaxation of his injured left arm.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

1. Using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - KAATSU Basics



The new KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is the second-generation KAATSU equipment.

The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is the smallest, quietest, most powerful KAATSU device yet - enabling people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds - to comfortably, safely and effectively do the patented KAATSU Cycle modality or the original KAATSU Training.

The new device can accelerate training when time is of the essence - at home, on the road during travel, at an airport, in the office while increasing strength, stamina, speed and range of motion, and improving circulation. Users can exercise, recover from jetlag, vigorous workouts and competition, and rehabilitate from injuries and surgery anytime and anywhere at their convenience.

Ageing Baby Boomers can tone muscle and improve their BMI (Body Mass Index) and Olympic athletes can gain strength without using weights while lessening the risk of injury to joints and muscles.

The pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands can also be untethered (disconnected) from the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 device so athletes and physical therapy patients can train bilaterally and separate from the device itself - with personally customized pressures appropriate to the age, condition and goals of the user.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

2. Using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Turning On and Off



KAATSU was invented by Dr. Yoshiaki Sato of Tokyo, Japan in a flash of inspiration in 1966.

After decades of self-experimentation, testing at the University of Tokyo Hospital, and vetting by hundreds of physicians, academic researchers and scientists in Japan and China, KAATSU was introduced in the United States in 2014. KAATSU has since expanded to 48 countries around the world with many users expected to participate in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games - thereby, bringing back a Japanese invention to Tokyo where it all began.

The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is the most recent culmination of over 50 years of expertise of Dr. Sato, his medical and scientific colleagues and collaborators, and thousands of coaches, therapists and trainers worldwide.

It can fit in the palm of your hand or in your pocket, but it also has a clip so you can use it in the gym or while walking, running, spinning, skating, stretching or doing any number of movements from yoga to physical therapy.

To turn on and off the KAATSU Cycle 2.0, press the ON/OFF button on a Long Hold (3 seconds).

In order to check and recharge the battery, there are four bars on the right side of the LED screen indicate a full battery life. When the bars decrease, the battery life is reduced. In order to recharge the battery, plug in the USB Type-C connector to a laptop or to the Power Adapter that is plugged into an electric outlet.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

3. Using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - KAATSU Safety



The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 is the next-generation KAATSU equipment based on 5 decades of testing and use by individuals up to the age of 104 years.

It has a unique and unprecedented safety track record with over 20 million individual KAATSU session in 48 countries around the globe to date.

The KAATSU protocols, including those for cardiac rehabilitation patients, were tested and proven by cardiologists at the University of Tokyo Hospital over a 10-year period. Their work resulted in several dozens of academic papers published in peer-review journals.

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

4. Using the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Six Pre-set KAATSU Pressures



The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 has six pre-set pressures for individuals to use.

KAATSU Cycle is a patented, proprietary method where the KAATSU Air Bands repeatedly inflate and deflate 8 times ("repetitions"). The inflation period is 30 seconds and the deflation period is 5 seconds. One complete KAATSU Cycle with 8 repetitions is 4 minutes 40 seconds in duration.

On top of the device, users can select Low, Medium and High levels. On the face of the device, users can either select the G (Group) mode that offers lower pressures) or P (Professional mode that offers high pressures).

The KAATSU Cycle 2.0 uses a combination of G or P pressures at either the Low, Medium or High levels.

So GL means Group Low. GM means Group Medium. GH means Group High. Likewise, PL means Professional Low. PM means Professional Medium. PH means Professional High. Each level offers incrementally higher pressures. KAATSU users should only use the optimal pressures appropriate to them. But everyone should start at the GL level and then increase as they see fit.

In the midst of the KAATSU Cycle, the pressure increases by 10 SKU (Standard KAATSU Unit) in each subsequent repetition. There are 8 repetitions per each Cycle. This gradual increase in pressure is safe and optimal - and leads to a healthful production of metabolites and hormones. The pressures of each of the 8 repetitions are as follows (from lowest to highest):

Group Low SKU pressure: 80 - 90 - 100 - 110 - 120 - 130 - 140 - 150
Group Medium SKU pressure: 130 - 140 - 150 - 160 - 170 - 180 - 190 - 200
Group High SKU pressure: 230 - 240 - 250 - 260 - 270 - 280 - 290 - 300
Professional Low SKU pressure: 180 - 190 - 200 - 210 - 220 - 230 - 240 - 250
Professional Medium SKU pressure: 280 - 290 - 300 - 310 - 320 - 330 - 340 - 350
Professional High SKU pressure: 330 - 340 - 350 - 360 - 370 - 380 - 390 - 400

Copyright © 2014 - 2019 by KAATSU Global

5. Preparing to Use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Placing the KAATSU Air Bands on Your Arms



The proper placement of the KAATSU Air Bands is absolutely critical to the safety and efficacy of the KAATSU equipment. There is only one proper position for the KAATSU Air Bands on the upper body.

Place the KAATSU Air Bands over your clothes.

The KAATSU Air Bands on your arms should be placed above your biceps and above your triceps, but below your deltoids (shoulder muscles) near your armpit.

Even if you have tendonitis in your elbow and are rehabilitating, or broke your finger or ribs, or want to develop your trapezius muscle, you still place the KAATSU Air Bands in the same position:

* above your biceps
* above your triceps
* below your deltoids (shoulder muscles)
* near your armpit

The effects of KAATSU are systemic. That is, there are only two places where you should position the KAATSU Air Bands: on your upper arms and upper legs. Any other location is wrong and can lead to problems.

The pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands must be connected to the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 device with the translucent connector tubes.

You should hear a small audible click when the tube connector is properly connected with the KAATSU Air Bands. This click ensures the lock is air tight.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

6. Preparing to Use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Placing the KAATSU Air Bands on Your Legs



The proper placement of the KAATSU Air Bands is absolutely critical to the safety and efficacy of the KAATSU equipment. There is only one proper position for the KAATSU Air Bands on your lower body.

Place the KAATSU Air Bands over your pants or shorts.

The KAATSU Air Bands on your legs should be placed should be placed above your quadriceps (i.e., front of your leg) and hamstrings (i.e., back of your legs), high up on your legs at an angle near your groin.

Even if you rehabilitating from a knee surgery, or broke your toe or tibia, or want to develop your calf muscles, you still place the KAATSU Air Bands in the same position:

* above your quadriceps
* above your hamstrings
* high up on your legs at an angle (that follows a bikini or briefs line)
* near your groin

The effects of KAATSU are systemic. That is, there are only two places where you should position the KAATSU Air Bands: on your upper arms and upper legs. Any other location is wrong and can lead to problems.

The pneumatic KAATSU Air Bands must be connected to the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 device with the translucent connector tubes.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

7. Preparing to Use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Checking Your Correct Arm Band Pressure



The KAATSU Air Bands should be placed snugly on your upper arms. Snug - but not tight.

When you put on the KAATSU Air Bands on your arms, you should be able to place one finger between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands. If you can place two or more fingers between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands, the bands are too loose and you may want to slightly tighten the KAATSU Air Bands.

However, if you manually tighten the KAATSU Air Bands too much, you will not be able to place a finger between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands. In this case, slightly loosen up the bands. KAATSU Air Bands are elastic Blood Flow Moderation bands with an inner air bladder; KAATSU Air Bands are neither a tourniquet or blood pressure cuff.

Occlusion training or blood flow restriction (BFR) training use tourniquets and blood pressure cuffs in order to restrict arterial flow (i.e., blood flow from the torso to the limbs). This is NOT what KAATSU Air Bands do. KAATSU Air Bands were specifically designed and engineered to modify venous flow (i.e., blood flow from the limbs back to the torso). This is a major and very important difference.

In order to confirm that your pressure is safe and optimized and your bands are on adequately tightly enough, you can check your Capillary Refill Time (CRT). On your arms, press your thumb into the base of the palm of your hand. The skin will temporarily blanch (i.e., go white) and then will refill back up with blood and return to normal color.

The duration of time for the blood to refill and the blanched spot to return to color should be between 1-3 seconds. If your skin does not turn back to its normal color within 3 seconds, the bands are on too tightly and should be loosened. If your skin is so engorged with blood that the blanched spot returns to color less than a second, that is OK too. When the color of your arms turns pink (or becomes rosy red or even a purple color), it means that your capillaries are thoroughly engorged in blood, thereby improving your circulation.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global

8. Preparing to Use the KAATSU Cycle 2.0 - Checking Your Correct Leg Band Pressure



The KAATSU Air Bands should be placed snugly on your upper legs. Snug - but not tight.

When you put on the KAATSU Air Bands on your legs, you should be able to place one finger between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands. If you can place two or more fingers between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands, the bands are too loose and you may want to slightly tighten the KAATSU Air Bands.

However, if you manually tighten the KAATSU Air Bands too much, you will not be able to place a finger between your skin and the KAATSU Air Bands. In this case, slightly loosen up the bands. KAATSU Air Bands are elastic Blood Flow Moderation bands with an inner air bladder; KAATSU Air Bands are neither a tourniquet or blood pressure cuff.

Occlusion training or blood flow restriction (BFR) training use tourniquets and blood pressure cuffs in order to restrict arterial flow (i.e., blood flow from the torso to the limbs). This is NOT what KAATSU Air Bands do. KAATSU Air Bands were specifically designed and engineered to modify venous flow (i.e., blood flow from the limbs back to the torso). This is a major and very important difference.

In order to confirm that your pressure is safe and optimized and your bands are on adequately tightly enough, you can check your Capillary Refill Time (CRT). On your legs, press your thumb into your thigh (quadriceps) just above your knee (patella) if you are wearing shorts. If you are wearing leggings or long pants, press your thumb into your calf near your ankle. The skin will temporarily blanch (i.e., go white) and then will refill back up with blood and return to normal color.

The duration of time for the blood to refill and the blanched spot to return to color should be less than 3 seconds. If your skin does not turn back to its normal color within 3 seconds, the bands are on too tightly and should be loosened. When your leg turns a pink color (or rosy red or even a purple tone), this means that your capillaries are thoroughly engorged in blood, thereby improving your circulation.

Copyright © 2014-2019 by KAATSU Global